Why is it ridiculously difficult to find a 6120 nut?

Jack Newcastle

Electromatic
Aug 25, 2022
11
Nice, France
Hi all,

I needed to replace my nut, and after trying a brass one and a TUSQ, which I had to file down, I'm trying now to just find an exact replacement for the original.

Model is 2002 6120 Japanese. You can see in the photo that the nut looks exactly like an Action Flow, which I can't find for sale.

IMG_20221007_191127.jpg
Unfortunately, the TUSQ I tried slopes down a bit too much to the treble side and I still get a bit of rattle on B and E.

Anyone know where I can find an exact replacement? This is making me bananas now.
 

G5422T

Country Gent
May 24, 2012
4,225
usa
Do you have a good luthier in your area?

Guess that I'm lucky, as I do, and he makes bone nuts from scratch, with a perfect set up for $40.

Best money that I've spent on my guitars. Saves a bunch a headaches too.

Best of luck
 

Tech21

Electromatic
Feb 23, 2018
75
New Zealand
I don't see a problem, buy a blank and make one.
Or if you are not capable of making one then take it to a guitar tech to have one made and fitted.
'cause any "off the shelf"nut you buy will require work doing on it before it's the correct fit and correct slot depth.
Or shim the one you've got.
Lots of options available.....
 
Last edited:

Jack Newcastle

Electromatic
Aug 25, 2022
11
Nice, France
Do you have a good luthier in your area?

Guess that I'm lucky, as I do, and he makes bone nuts from scratch, with a perfect set up for $40.

Best money that I've spent on my guitars. Saves a bunch a headaches too.

Best of luck
I live in Nice, France. They do have a lot of luthiers here, but they seem mainly focus on violin, cello, etc. There's only one guitar repairman, and unfortunately, he has poor reviews. The other problem they have here is that once you drop something off to be repaired in France, you don't get it back "until they get around to it." Whenever that is.
 

Toneconsultant

Electromatic
Feb 12, 2021
9
Toneville
Hi all,

I needed to replace my nut, and after trying a brass one and a TUSQ, which I had to file down, I'm trying now to just find an exact replacement for the original.

Model is 2002 6120 Japanese. You can see in the photo that the nut looks exactly like an Action Flow, which I can't find for sale.

View attachment 191530
Unfortunately, the TUSQ I tried slopes down a bit too much to the treble side and I still get a bit of rattle on B and E.

Anyone know where I can find an exact replacement? This is making me bananas now.
Someone may have answer your question, but if not, the answer is you are going about this incorrectly. Don't look for a specific nut for any guitar. Simply find a local luthier and they will make one for you. I simply keep bone blanks just for this. I make them all day and so does any guitar repair or luthier. Hope it helps.
 

Londonbus

Gretschie
Oct 19, 2012
127
Pacific Northwest
I live in Nice, France. They do have a lot of luthiers here, but they seem mainly focus on violin, cello, etc. There's only one guitar repairman, and unfortunately, he has poor reviews. The other problem they have here is that once you drop something off to be repaired in France, you don't get it back "until they get around to it." Whenever that is.

Anybody else with decent luthier skills want to set up shop with me on the French Riviera?
 

Chubbylab

Electromatic
Jun 5, 2020
8
Gaastra mi
You can clean string slot,tape around nut,and fill with baking soda,then open fresh tube of super glue,and put ONE small drop one soda,and let set overnight, then refile to desired depth,you'll never know repair is there. Dan Erliwine taught us that at the Guitar Hospital, his old shop before he did Stew Mac thing.
 

MadKaw

Gretschie
Apr 17, 2020
264
Michigan, USA
Making a nut isn't hard. As someone who didn't really know what I was doing, I followed the one rule I have learned over many years doing lots of different things. When you don't know what you're doing, take your time. Spend lots of time thinking about what you're doing, use hand tools, if sanding or grinding, use a finer grit than a professional would to slow yourself down. Check the fit often. No, more often than that.
It's not an efficient process and it wouldn't work if you wanted somebody to pay for it. I figure that if I wanted to make a living making nuts the way I did for my own use, I'd have to charge $300 or so. Yeah, that's not going to happen.
 


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