Why Are Vintage Style Junior Guitars So Expensive?

Lou Coppolino

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2022
1,428
Howell, NJ
???????????????


This has an extra screw in the p/g.

It has changes.

Uh huh...............

 
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Ricochet

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2009
22,723
Monkey Island
"Investors"... I was looking to get a vintage '60-ish Gibson SG Jr not even a decade ago(maybe 6-7 years?), went on Reverb and found 3 Jrs around the 1200 mark. Try looking them up now... There is no way prices naturally inflated to more than triple that in a 7 year time span.
 
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blueruins

Friend of Fred
May 28, 2013
5,057
Savannah, GA
Shocked by these prices as well. Essentially a slab with strings and very simple to manufacture.

I’m super glad I didn’t know about the Beato Junior. Not that I’m such a huge fan that I would want his specific guitar, but It has the exact features that I am looking for in the color that I want as well.

That price tho🙄
 

tmcq65

Gretschie
Nov 10, 2021
168
Eastern Tennessee
There was a big discussion about the future value of vintage instruments (was it here, on on my other guitar forum?) that supposed these guitars will no longer be valued when the "Boomers" are no longer collecting them. I believe the point where vintage instruments are a potential investment is way past. Perhaps it's the boomer thing, but there are three aspects to an item's value: it's objective quality, it's objective scarcity, and it's subjective desirability. Many vintage instruments have a great quality, and arguably an increasing scarcity....but the high prices seen recently, I would argue, are supported mostly by the subjective desirability. That can, and likely will change - making the biggest portion of a particular vintage instrument's price extremely volatile. Volatile and at a high peak are not a good combination for an investment.
 

stiv

Country Gent
Sep 12, 2014
2,610
Firenze, Italy
There was a big discussion about the future value of vintage instruments (was it here, on on my other guitar forum?) that supposed these guitars will no longer be valued when the "Boomers" are no longer collecting them. I believe the point where vintage instruments are a potential investment is way past. Perhaps it's the boomer thing, but there are three aspects to an item's value: it's objective quality, it's objective scarcity, and it's subjective desirability. Many vintage instruments have a great quality, and arguably an increasing scarcity....but the high prices seen recently, I would argue, are supported mostly by the subjective desirability. That can, and likely will change - making the biggest portion of a particular vintage instrument's price extremely volatile. Volatile and at a high peak are not a good combination for an investment.
I don’t think the Boomers will kill the vintage guitar market.
The absolutely bonkers prices (that would prevent anybody on putting that kind of money on an instrument) and the fact that many of them would be, in a very short time, owned by a few selected people (that would, at best, make trades between themselves) well… it may probably will.
 

hcsterg

Friend of Fred
Silver Member
Feb 13, 2012
6,843
France

stiv

Country Gent
Sep 12, 2014
2,610
Firenze, Italy
I bought a used Epi SG Jr with a bolt-on neck and upgraded pickup for a $100 bucks. I’d gig it, seriously.
I did. I bought an Epi LP Jr. in TV Yellow in a Pawn shop for cheap during my last US bunch of gigs in the North West (it was long time ago btw). It served me just right as my main electric.
When I went home I left it to my friend in Portland. 🙂
 

Back in Black

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jun 22, 2020
1,714
Ontario Canada
???????????????


This has an extra screw in the p/g.

It has changes.

Uh huh...............

Don't forget Lou,

There's Reverb prices, and then there's everyone else, and...

The advertised price, and the sold price are often worlds apart.

With any guitar advertised on Reverb, that has caught my interest, I've always contacted the owner directly as Reverb's ''broker'' commission is high, and they tack a surcharge on shipping costs as well.

Best,

BIB.
 

Craig Encinitas

Gretschie
Gold Supporting Member
May 3, 2021
410
Encinitas, Ca
In the early 90's and 80's, these cost less than $1k total................

View attachment 190711
View attachment 190712


What happened?
… Simple answer, because people are paying that kind of money. If people didn’t pay that amount, they would go for less.

Does that sound too cynical?

Prices sometimes come down.

Here’s an example. If these listings are still available (which I just searched on Reverb), two were listed a year ago and one has been listed for three years. All three having many offers, but apparently not enough for them to sell.

So what is the actual value?

🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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Emergence

Synchromatic
Gold Supporting Member
May 25, 2022
706
New York
Of course Boomers won't kill the vintage market. They ARE the vintage market.
I’m not sure about that. Boomers who did well can retire with more coming in than while they were working. But with age comes wisdom. I have more than I need and little I want but have no desire to buy what I don’t need or have little use for. I don’t know about the next generation. What helped my wife and me was a defined benefit pension, a 401K, social security, and my wife still working part time selling insurance. The company I worked for ended it’s contributions to pensions. Social security is always on the chopping block. A 401K relies on sustainable, or at least cyclical growth and active asset management. Maybe I just proved myself wrong. Mine may be the last generation where this confluence is possible.
 


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