Who reads music?

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by NowEarThis, Sep 11, 2021.

My music reading is

  1. Very proficient

    11 vote(s)
    13.9%
  2. I'm ok with it

    33 vote(s)
    41.8%
  3. Not good

    21 vote(s)
    26.6%
  4. Never bothered to learn

    14 vote(s)
    17.7%
  1. Being young & pliant is crucial to a lot of skills in the learning phase.
    Looking at spoken language—it is a rare person that becomes truly proficient in new languages & probably started before reaching adulthood.

    I suspect 3rd & 4th languages are much easier after a solid 2nd is internalized. By that I mean hardwired & an independent skill from translating it to one’s first language to be understood.

    A great many call themselves “self-taught” because they learned from books & materials & videos someone else produced, as though the act of reading, listening or watching counts as being an island unto oneself—self-taught. Like the Professor on Self-Taught Island who builds radios out of coconuts.

    Standard notation does not address guitar very well at all.

    What works best for me, are 2 lines, one in std notation & 1 in tab, to get the timing, etc as close as I can. Translating even tab into the feel of a piece of music without hearing it played correctly; being familiar with it, is sometimes arduous when it shouldn’t be.

    That said, tablature is far from a standardized form even now. Tablature written by someone who does not read standard notation can be clumsy. Nobody seems to be pulling this together & honing the forms.
     
    NowEarThis and MrWookiee like this.
  2. Strumming, or fingerstyle?
    The next question would be do you play classical fingerstyle?

    Just the number of fingers used & approach to music is nearly a language on its own.
     
  3. NowEarThis

    NowEarThis Gretschie

    Age:
    70
    231
    Jun 23, 2021
    Northern Rivers NSW Australia
    I think tablature on it’s own is a good finger/fret guide and works well if you’re familiar with the tune. Having notation alongside can describe how it is meant to sound or be played.

    It works for me and once I get familiar with it, I prefer to read the dots because charts are always written that way. And it improves my sigh reading skills.
     
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