Who has a garden going?

Scott Fraser

Country Gent
Jan 14, 2012
1,620
Los Angeles
There's a movement around the US to return to locally native plants. No one needs acres of putting green thick lawns. Huge yards only make sense if you raise sheep.
Here in LA drought has imposed severe water restrictions, so my front garden project has pivoted to a drought resistant native plant orientation. It's looking better than it has in the 34 years I've lived here. It's my new favorite hobby.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,707
Petaluma
I'm too fussy and anal and easily distracted to have a garden. I am thinking of planting some herbs in our kitchen window casing though.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,568
lafayette in
Here in LA drought has imposed severe water restrictions, so my front garden project has pivoted to a drought resistant native plant orientation. It's looking better than it has in the 34 years I've lived here. It's my new favorite hobby.
We've even got a drought here in usually green Indiana. 8th driest June on record they say.
For those of you in the West, remember that at one time the Colorado River emptied into the Gulf of California. Years of siphoning off the water has stopped that. Part of the problem is green lawns, surfing pools, and fountains in the desert (looking at you Las Vegas. People have gone back to rocks and cactus.). Diverting water to the Imperial Valley is significant, but at least that feeds a lot of people, tho the water used by almond groves is significant. Then, there's Nestle' selling city water all over the world. Their CEO has said that people don't have a right to water. Tell that to the folks in Flint Michigan.
Here, a newish factory installed 36" wells for a steel plant. All of a sudden, folks' wells were drying up as it depleted the water table. That's an issue in many places in the West with center point irrigation. Not saying anything about climate change, but, we need to come up with some serious water conservation pretty soon.
 

Scott Fraser

Country Gent
Jan 14, 2012
1,620
Los Angeles
We've even got a drought here in usually green Indiana. 8th driest June on record they say.
For those of you in the West, remember that at one time the Colorado River emptied into the Gulf of California. Years of siphoning off the water has stopped that. Part of the problem is green lawns, surfing pools, and fountains in the desert (looking at you Las Vegas. People have gone back to rocks and cactus.). Diverting water to the Imperial Valley is significant, but at least that feeds a lot of people, tho the water used by almond groves is significant. Then, there's Nestle' selling city water all over the world. Their CEO has said that people don't have a right to water. Tell that to the folks in Flint Michigan.
And a new desalinization plant project was just turned down in Southern California!! There's enough water on the planet. It's just not always where people need it most. Yeah, lawns are now a big part of the problem here. LA is paying people to remove their lawns & replace them with drought resistant native plants.
Here, a newish factory installed 36" wells for a steel plant. All of a sudden, folks' wells were drying up as it depleted the water table. That's an issue in many places in the West with center point irrigation. Not saying anything about climate change, but, we need to come up with some serious water conservation pretty soon.
Water rights law needs to be rewritten to reflect current reality, and the fact that all are drawing from a common aquifer, regardless of whose land the well sits upon.
 

MGllm

Synchromatic
Jun 6, 2008
881
McKinney, Texas
We put in a small raised garden each yeat. This year the tomotoes were roasted by the unseasonable Texas sun and heat. I pulled them all yesterday as they had given all they were going to. A week ago a swarm of cicada killer wasps decided they wanted to burrow in our garden dirt. They are a huge nuisance. I'll plant some lettuce and other cool temp crops this fall.
This is one of the most frustrating garden seasons ever, for us.
 

Jelly Roll Horton

Country Gent
Nov 10, 2017
1,940
Portland, OR
Oh yeah. This was May 1. It‘s 3x as big now. Tomatoes, lettuce blueberries, raspberries, snow peas, peppers, onions, garlic… my wife does all the planting, I just do the digging and heavy lifting .. and eating. Her flower garden is even bigger. 1657079384537.jpeg
 

jvin248

Gretschie
May 16, 2017
170
Near Detroit
.

It's somewhat depressing to see pictures/videos of ten foot tall tassled corn from the Deep South or Tennessee/Kentucky while my corn here in the North is at the local positive metric 'knee high by the 4th' (actually some of the first planted is shoulder height).

When posting pictures, add what State the garden is grown in or last frost date (mine is mid-May).

.
 

audept

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Dec 1, 2010
29,459
Sydney, Australia
We only have a very small backyard but we have a lemon tree which has a high yield about half year round. I try to grow herbs but the snails devour the Basil. The only thing that survives is the Rosemary plant. The Kaffir Lime tree is a failure and the birdseye chilli bush is unreliable. :(
 

Gregor

Country Gent
Oct 17, 2018
1,210
New Brunswick, Canada
And these are my new chickens. I just finished building a nice run for them (8' x 24') with an attached chicken coop on one end. There are six of them and they are about 16 weeks old. Four of them are laying now with the other two scheduled to come on line here shortly.

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Here they are in their temporary quarters because I hadn't quite finished their run when I got the call to pick them up. The dog makes sure nothing comes and gets them at night. Construction on the new pen going on in the background.

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I can see why nothing bothers the chickens. ...that dog would scare ME away!
 


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