Who has a garden going?

guitarfarm

Country Gent
Dec 29, 2008
1,339
Neither here nor there...
Mine is starting to look promising. My wife has been going out and picking her salads right off the garden all week. Got three kinds of lettuce, kale, Swiss chard, two kinds of potatoes, green onions, garlic, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes (some are nearly ripe enough to pick), jalapenos, and several different fresh herbs. Using some 100 gallon waterers as containers this year. Filled them with half Miracle Grow and half composted goat manure. Have many more containers on the porch for the smaller plants.

Containers pre planting.

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Potatoes (Kennebeck I think).

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More potatoes. These are Yukon Gold.

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A row of spinach with rows of green onions flanking them.

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I love cooking with fresh produce straight from the garden.
 

mrfixitmi

Country Gent
Mar 20, 2010
1,921
Michigan
@guitarfarm

Thanks for sharing this, your water container idea is fantastic!
We had used a wooden box made from fence posts. The issue was that it became a smorgasbord for rabbits. My wife decided to put in hostas last year to give the rabbits some food, so that the tomatoes, carrots, and cukes were left untouched....this only attracted more rabbits. We will have to consider changing to a raised garden, but the galvanized tubs are very expensive here.
 

guitarfarm

Country Gent
Dec 29, 2008
1,339
Neither here nor there...
@guitarfarm

Thanks for sharing this, your water container idea is fantastic!
We had used a wooden box made from fence posts. The issue was that it became a smorgasbord for rabbits. My wife decided to put in hostas last year to give the rabbits some food, so that the tomatoes, carrots, and cukes were left untouched....this only attracted more rabbits. We will have to consider changing to a raised garden, but the galvanized tubs are very expensive here.


These aren't galvanized. They are made of very heavy plastic. Still expensive, but I already had them from the cattle and the horses. I'm not too worried about rabbits as I have an extremely large dog who roams my property day and night. Not too much goes on here that she isn't aware of.
 

guitarfarm

Country Gent
Dec 29, 2008
1,339
Neither here nor there...
And these are my new chickens. I just finished building a nice run for them (8' x 24') with an attached chicken coop on one end. There are six of them and they are about 16 weeks old. Four of them are laying now with the other two scheduled to come on line here shortly.

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Here they are in their temporary quarters because I hadn't quite finished their run when I got the call to pick them up. The dog makes sure nothing comes and gets them at night. Construction on the new pen going on in the background.

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tmcq65

Gretschie
Nov 10, 2021
141
Eastern Tennessee
In the early 2000's I had two consecutive years that I tried gardening with opposing calamitous results. The first year, a heatwave / drought rendered my vegetation flaky, straw-like ash....the next, a flood washed all of my raised planter boxes into the next lot. I swore off gardening as some kind of message from God, fearing another plague.

Against what should obviously be better judgement, I've tried a tomato and a pepper plant this year, and they are doing well....but if earthquakes, volcanos, or locusts descend upon Eastern Tennessee.....you all will know, it was my fault.
 

loudnlousy

Gretschified
Oct 18, 2015
12,344
Germany
When my wife was still well she insisted on renting a house with a garden.
I told her that I really dislike garden-work and when she wanted a house with a garden the garden would be her part.
She loved to spend hours cutting trees and mowing the lawn.
Now that she is very ill I have to do this miserable work. And what is more: Everything I do there gets a sour comment.
I am just about to put some concrete all over it and paint it green....
 

Armygirl

Country Gent
Mar 14, 2014
3,672
Edinburgh
I moved into a small house, with a small garden a month ago, after 18 years in a top floor flat, with nothing but a few houseplants. It has nothing alive in it yet, save a few knackered plants I put in the I felt sorry for in the supermarket. It is a good framework for a decent wee back yard. It needs a lot of digging out, that hideous plastic grass is going in the bin and some nice, hardy (i.e. frost resistant) plants which will give me year-round colour and some bee-attracting grass will ne planted. Rome wasn't built in a day though. I started renovating that completely derelict furniture into something usable... I'm hopefully going to be painting that shed something less awful (it's actually a bar!) And well see what it looks like by this time next year. Dougal the cat likes it, so that's a bonus ... I'm new at all of this so any advice is welcome. I'm getting garden envy from all these other photos!
 

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MrClint

Gretschie
Nov 27, 2017
300
Lake Balboa, CA
I have a small backyard garden and orchard that has been going strong for about 15 years now. The goal was to walk out my back door and bring in fresh fruit and veg each and every day of the year. Not a ton to harvest like for canning and such, but just enough for fresh eating. So far so good. We can garden year round here here in So Cal, so with a successive harvesting plan that calls for growing things according to the season, the goal has been very doable.

Right now oranges and lemons are holding on the trees, peaches and nectarines are winding down. Tomatoes and cucumbers are on the upswing. Swiss chard is holding surprisingly well in the heat. So on and so forth.
 

Ricochet

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Nov 13, 2009
21,857
Monkey Island
That looks fantastic. I've been toying with the idea for years. I miss my fresh Italian herbes, and chili peppers are getting expensive(even over here). Unfortunately there is no room in the small compound we live on.
We have a small plot of land but it's half a mile away, and there's no fence nor watch. So unfortunately in todays reality, growing stuff is a pointless endeavour.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,568
lafayette in
I am just about to put some concrete all over it and paint it green....
I saw a place where the guy did just that. His kids worked on their cars in the front yard, reducing it to a mud pit. Dad had it concreted over, painted it green.
There's a movement around the US to return to locally native plants. No one needs acres of putting green thick lawns. Huge yards only make sense if you raise sheep.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,568
lafayette in
I moved into a small house, with a small garden a month ago, after 18 years in a top floor flat, with nothing but a few houseplants. It has nothing alive in it yet, save a few knackered plants I put in the I felt sorry for in the supermarket. It is a good framework for a decent wee back yard. It needs a lot of digging out, that hideous plastic grass is going in the bin and some nice, hardy (i.e. frost resistant) plants which will give me year-round colour and some bee-attracting grass will ne planted. Rome wasn't built in a day though. I started renovating that completely derelict furniture into something usable... I'm hopefully going to be painting that shed something less awful (it's actually a bar!) And well see what it looks like by this time next year. Dougal the cat likes it, so that's a bonus ... I'm new at all of this so any advice is welcome. I'm getting garden envy from all these other photos!
You don't have to mow plastic grass/Astroturf.
Plant catnip. Your fuzzball will appreciate it highly.
 

Falconetti

Gretschie
Sep 18, 2012
380
Bagsville, Oxford UK
Plenty of plastic grass around in southern England just now. I find it a bit sad but can appreciate the practicality if mowing stops you from playing your Gretsch. My garden like most of my things is an expression of my taste and a result of a lot of thought and consideration. It is also my place of safety when things get rough. I try to help out nature a little bit if I can so no sprays, pellets or poisons. I have a reasonable, functional lawn for the dog to ruin but I also have a large former lawn which I have now turned over to a wild flower meadow for the pollinators, beetles and small rodents I don't grow vegetables because I like classic English herbaceous borders with bulbs, annuals and perennials which magically rise from nothing each Spring. If I wasn't a guitar player I would be a gardener. My son is Head Gardener at a 20 acre private estate near me. He loves his work and plants out schemes which he know he will never see to fruition in his tenure because they won't be properly mature for another 50 years. Attitudes such as his give me hope.
 

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guitarfarm

Country Gent
Dec 29, 2008
1,339
Neither here nor there...
I saw a place where the guy did just that. His kids worked on their cars in the front yard, reducing it to a mud pit. Dad had it concreted over, painted it green.
There's a movement around the US to return to locally native plants. No one needs acres of putting green thick lawns. Huge yards only make sense if you raise sheep.

No sheep and there never will be. But we have cattle, horses, a donkey, goats, and now chickens. I like having acres and acres of green around me. It is my buffer from the world.
 


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