Un-Shiny my 6120

oldguy

Electromatic
May 21, 2022
4
Los Angeles
Hi, I'm oldguy. (new to this forum, but old in the mirror)
I bought a new Vintage Select '59 6120 in 2017.To my taste, the orange is too dark, and it's too glossy looking. Gretsch has since come out with better looking 6120's. Lighter, way less gloss, older, cooler looking. Wondering if it's possible to get mine to look like that. Or if it makes sense to get rid of this one and get a newer one. Thanks in advance.
 

oldguy

Electromatic
May 21, 2022
4
Los Angeles
Also, the new Vintage Select '59 6120 is described as having a V-shaped neck. My neck is anything but V-shaped. It's quite flat and shallow.
Has anyone played the newer V-shaped 6120's? I wouldn't mind a neck with a bit more character! Are the newer ones just all-around hipper?
 

Chet Harrison

Gretschie
Apr 27, 2020
229
USA
I’ve heard people try to knock the shine down with scotchbrite pads, but it will be difficult to get it even all over. The places where your skin touches the guitar will shine up again over time.

I’d sell it and buy a Setzer Smoke!
 

pmac11

Country Gent
Mar 4, 2018
3,645
Toronto, Ontario
No doubt there's someone out there in the world looking for a shiny, dark orange 6120. Find that person and sell your guitar to them. Then buy the one you want!
 

dspellman

Gretschie
Jul 4, 2020
312
Los Angeles
Hi, I'm oldguy. (new to this forum, but old in the mirror)
I bought a new Vintage Select '59 6120 in 2017.To my taste, the orange is too dark, and it's too glossy looking. Gretsch has since come out with better looking 6120's. Lighter, way less gloss, older, cooler looking. Wondering if it's possible to get mine to look like that. Or if it makes sense to get rid of this one and get a newer one. Thanks in advance.
Get a new one. If lighter orange, less gloss is what you're looking for in the cosmetics and they have that in the newer ones, I'd go for it. It makes more sense than any DIY solution that might surface...
 

dspellman

Gretschie
Jul 4, 2020
312
Los Angeles
I’ve heard people try to knock the shine down with scotchbrite pads, but it will be difficult to get it even all over. The places where your skin touches the guitar will shine up again over time.
It gets worse. I've picked up a couple of Agiles to which scotchbrite has been applied, and they're horrendous. One was entirely done, but the slob didn't remove the hardware to do the job; just sort of scratched around it. Looked terrible, close or far away. I think he sold it out of embarrassment. I went after the face of the guitar to try to get that back to a reasonable gloss, and it took forever, and I ended up leaving the back, sides and neck as they were.

The good news, I guess, was that the guitar was barely used, in otherwise good shape and dirt cheap.

And it still sounds good. So there's that.
 

Pemberton

Gretschie
May 4, 2022
113
Pennsylvania, USA
I own both vintage and new. I've never really liked the way some new guitars are so clean and shiny, and the thought has crossed my mind to somehow "un-shiny" them. But I'm glad I never did because I'm sure they would just end up looking terrible, not to mention killing the resale value.

I don't plan on ever buying another new guitar. I just like the way an old guitar looks and feels.

But I agree with the other comments in that you should sell what you're not happy with, and buy something that when you wake up in the morning, you just can't wait to pick it up and start playing.

Life's too short to own guitars that you're not in love with,

~Pemberton
 

BohemianLikeMe

Synchromatic
Apr 18, 2020
674
Prague, CZ
No doubt there's someone out there in the world looking for a shiny, dark orange 6120. Find that person and sell your guitar to them. Then buy the one you want!
Seconded, and I'd suggest looking for one of the 6120-LTV models, which are nitro finished and definitely less shiny.
 


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