Tiny tip for removing scratches

Scamp

Gretschie
Feb 22, 2018
259
SoCal
Used toothpaste for years on fine scratches especially on the plastic on my bike. Also there is a real fine scratch remover that works great on fine scratches. I get it at the bike shop. There is a polish, which is what you want, and a wax. Used to go over my bike once a year with the polish then wax it it would look brand new
Just remember polish is abrasive and wax is a coating so make sure your always using the right one or you could put scratches on the item your trying to fix
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,001
Atlanta
FYI - toothpaste has some pretty good abrasives in it, so I'm not surprised!

However, why on earth would anyone want to remove a scratch from their guitar?

If you keep removing scratches, you will never achieve this glorious look:

Screen Shot 2022-02-11 at 09.44.04.png

or better yet, this look:

Screen Shot 2022-02-11 at 09.45.47.png

And since you mentioned Tele (Roy Buchanan's):

Screen Shot 2022-02-11 at 09.47.06.png
 

Craig Encinitas

Gretschie
May 3, 2021
211
Encinitas, Ca
Sorry to disagree, Henry, but I have sucessfully rubbed out the scratch because it was very shallow, not breaking the color layer. I have done this on autos for years. If the color coat isn’t damaged and the scratch isn’t real deep, it can be rubbed out. I don’t know if that fits your definition for removal, but careful rubbing does work in certain situations.

Kinda like this…

That’s all it takes really…pressure and time.
 

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stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,001
Atlanta
No apology necessary. We just have a different perspective. Buffing / rubbing, to me, is not removing a scratch as it is scratching around the scratch so that you can't see the scratch anymore. Take a grain of sand and rub it against the surface and you get a scratch. Put millions of grains of sand on a piece of paper and rub it against your surface and you get millions of scratches. It's just evenly scratched in an aesthetically pleasing way. :)
Kind of but not kind of. That particular larger "valley" literally goes away by definition. Rather than being filled, the area around it is lowered and there is literally no longer a trench. So it is true, the bottom of the trench stays where it is. But there is no longer a trench by definition. One could also say that there are always scratches, just larger and smaller ones.
 

Jelly Roll Horton

Country Gent
Nov 10, 2017
1,886
Portland, OR
No apology necessary. We just have a different perspective. Buffing / rubbing, to me, is not removing a scratch as it is scratching around the scratch so that you can't see the scratch anymore. Take a grain of sand and rub it against the surface and you get a scratch. Put millions of grains of sand on a piece of paper and rub it against your surface and you get millions of scratches. It's just evenly scratched in an aesthetically pleasing way. :)
I didn’t use sandpaper. My scratch was only about 1/2"+.
I used a piece of soft old cotton T shirt for the original application of the toothpaste and light buffing. Then I used higher pressure with just my bare thumb. wetting when necessary. When that was looking good, I wiped off what residue there was, then applied some Martin’s Guitar Cleaner and Polish according to instructions. I then gave it all another light buff with a Martin guitar cloth.
 

O Riley

Synchromatic
Jun 2, 2018
587
Beautifull Tennessee
I've been using tooth paste for years.
Now I'm using, ~ Meguiar's Scratch X ~
Fine scratch and blemish remover.
Totally safe on all painted problems. Also, restores a brilliant and clear finish !

But wait !! ~ Now With Wax Protection ~
Get yours today. At fine automotive shops everywhere.
Don't wait. Supplies are limited!
 
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