The Wonderful World of Echo

calebaaron666

Friend of Fred
Aug 15, 2018
7,317
Auburn, Maine
Even though I already have a Full Tone Tube Tape Echo, I’m longing for one of these beauties.
Once I pay a few things off…. It will be mine…
oh yes…. It will be mine.

Echo Fix EF-X2 Tape Echo
 

Rodi

Electromatic
Feb 17, 2017
55
Connecticut
Even though I already have a Full Tone Tube Tape Echo, I’m longing for one of these beauties.
Once I pay a few things off…. It will be mine…
oh yes…. It will be mine.

Echo Fix EF-X2 Tape Echo

They have a newer model out.
Was all outta my range but a nice Korg Stage Echo and Blue Nebula hit home this week.
 

calebaaron666

Friend of Fred
Aug 15, 2018
7,317
Auburn, Maine
They have a newer model out.
Was all outta my range but a nice Korg Stage Echo and Blue Nebula hit home this week.
Yeah, I saw pictures of the new one. Looks like it’s only a rack mount, or at least I didn’t see any in a box.
The older one looks like it’s perfect as is.
 

calebaaron666

Friend of Fred
Aug 15, 2018
7,317
Auburn, Maine
I think it has ping pong stereo and yhey ditched the digital reverb n chorus.

Almost went for one, cool machines!
The spring reverb sounds great. The digital might be great for vocals, but not really a guitar verb I’d want.

In the meantime, I would love to find someone who wants to trade their Fulltone SS Tape Echo for my Tube Tape Echo.

But, as a feller says, wish in one hand and “you know what” in the other then see which fills faster! Haha
 

Scott Fraser

Country Gent
Jan 14, 2012
1,630
Los Angeles
I've worked a bit with a plate. A piece of 1/4" steel, 4' Tall and 12' long. I have no idea of the weight, but it had to be easily 500 pounds. It was suspended by springs in a wooden frame. The steel could actually pick up acoustic noise from nearby sources as well as the electronic sources on it, so it was isolated in a small room of its own.
The EMT plate is more like several mils thick, suspended by springs from a steel rack, enclosed in a very thick particle board case. My first studio job back in the mid 70s was in a mastering & recording facility which kept 3 EMT 240 plates in the tape storage room. We had to be very, very quiet when entering to fetch tapes, since the place had 4 disk cutting & recording rooms busy around the clock, and the plates could have audio running through them at any hour. You don't want to have to go tell a mastering engineer that you're the one who dropped a tape box onto the plate while he was cutting a lacquer master.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,380
Tucson
@Synchro You are an enabler!!!!! And yes, I am very weak! However, your mention of this Stanley Blue Nebula has me wayyyyy more than curious. This comes on the heels of my discovering and loving everything about the new Halo by Keeley.

I love my 4-drum echo emulator Catalinbread Echorec and admit I still am discovering new possibilities. but you know that curiosity leads to GAS!!!!

However, if I "need" anything, it would be Tavo's Mystery Brain..... I listen to R.J. Ronquillo's test drive repeatedly:


The Mystery Brain is one of the best choices out there.
Even though I already have a Full Tone Tube Tape Echo, I’m longing for one of these beauties.
Once I pay a few things off…. It will be mine…
oh yes…. It will be mine.

Echo Fix EF-X2 Tape Echo

That sounds fantastic.
The EMT plate is more like several mils thick, suspended by springs from a steel rack, enclosed in a very thick particle board case. My first studio job back in the mid 70s was in a mastering & recording facility which kept 3 EMT 240 plates in the tape storage room. We had to be very, very quiet when entering to fetch tapes, since the place had 4 disk cutting & recording rooms busy around the clock, and the plates could have audio running through them at any hour. You don't want to have to go tell a mastering engineer that you're the one who dropped a tape box onto the plate while he was cutting a lacquer master.
I’ve wondered about that. I would imagine that a plate could be affected by loud noises in its room. How thick is the steel in one of those units?
 

Scott Fraser

Country Gent
Jan 14, 2012
1,630
Los Angeles
I’ve wondered about that. I would imagine that a plate could be affected by loud noises in its room. How thick is the steel in one of those units?
The steel plate is just a few mils thick. There's a driver, kind of like a speaker, attached near the middle of the plate, with a couple pickups attached a few feet away on opposite ends. The plate is 6 or 8 feet long by about 4 feet high, with spring clips around the perimeter, attached to a rigid steel frame. The true plate reverb tech geniuses knew how to perfectly tune the plate by adding or subtracting spring tension. Just like a well tuned Strat trem. The particle board box it's suspended in is about a foot wide.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,380
Tucson
The steel plate is just a few mils thick. There's a driver, kind of like a speaker, attached near the middle of the plate, with a couple pickups attached a few feet away on opposite ends. The plate is 6 or 8 feet long by about 4 feet high, with spring clips around the perimeter, attached to a rigid steel frame. The true plate reverb tech geniuses knew how to perfectly tune the plate by adding or subtracting spring tension. Just like a well tuned Strat trem. The particle board box it's suspended in is about a foot wide.
So the plate itself must be somewhat delicate and require careful handling, until it’s mounted. I have heard of touring acts that actually had one that they took on the road, but that would be a heckuva hassle, and probably rough on the springs. My thinking would be to build one, and never move it, so much as an inch.
 

NJDevil

Country Gent
Jul 9, 2014
1,521
Commack, NY
IMO, this is David Gilmour in a box.................


I had the choice but still preferred the Catalinbread Echorec. No right or wrong but I just liked it better for all things Gilmour. I found that the Echorec paired better with other pedals and I tried a lot of scenarios. That the magic though of the 4-drum echo pedals in that there are so many options and then that grows exponentially with some pedals. It is pretty much the only time I use a fuzz pedal......example is a JHS Muffaletta --> Phase 90 --> Echorec.

The Boonar was bit noisy(at times) but just liked the Echorec better. Splitting hairs really as they are both great.
 

Lou Coppolino

Synchromatic
Jul 23, 2022
774
Howell, NJ
I had the choice but still preferred the Catalinbread Echorec. No right or wrong but I just liked it better for all things Gilmour. I found that the Echorec paired better with other pedals and I tried a lot of scenarios. That the magic though of the 4-drum echo pedals in that there are so many options and then that grows exponentially with some pedals. It is pretty much the only time I use a fuzz pedal......example is a JHS Muffaletta --> Phase 90 --> Echorec.

The Boonar was bit noisy(at times) but just liked the Echorec better. Splitting hairs really as they are both great.


I have a Catalinbread Echorec also.

IMO, it's very good but I prefer the Boonar.

 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,380
Tucson
I had the choice but still preferred the Catalinbread Echorec. No right or wrong but I just liked it better for all things Gilmour. I found that the Echorec paired better with other pedals and I tried a lot of scenarios. That the magic though of the 4-drum echo pedals in that there are so many options and then that grows exponentially with some pedals. It is pretty much the only time I use a fuzz pedal......example is a JHS Muffaletta --> Phase 90 --> Echorec.

The Boonar was bit noisy(at times) but just liked the Echorec better. Splitting hairs really as they are both great.
I’ve never been disappointed with a Catalinbread pedal. They make great stuff.
 

Scott Fraser

Country Gent
Jan 14, 2012
1,630
Los Angeles
So the plate itself must be somewhat delicate and require careful handling, until it’s mounted. I have heard of touring acts that actually had one that they took on the road, but that would be a heckuva hassle, and probably rough on the springs. My thinking would be to build one, and never move it, so much as an inch.
Super delicate. And the whole device is about 8 feet long by 4 feet high by 1 foot thick, weighing many hundreds of pounds. Anybody thinking of touring one of these is smoking crack.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,380
Tucson
Super delicate. And the whole device is about 8 feet long by 4 feet high by 1 foot thick, weighing many hundreds of pounds. Anybody thinking of touring one of these is smoking crack.
Believe it or not, someone actually did tour with one. I don’t recall the name of the band, but apparently they actually moved one of these on a regular basis, and then had to tune the spring suspension, daily. I can’t imagine this being beneficial to the health of the unit, but I can definitely understand why an act would want the benefits of a plate reverb, and in the Classic Rock era,

It wasn’t until the mid ‘70s that a digital Plate Reverb emulator came into existence, in the form of the EMT 250, which used discreet Integrated Circuits. These units were much smaller than an actual plate reverb, but still fairly hefty, and the price was nearly that of a full sized Mercedes sedan, of the time. This was definitely not for the home enthusiast, unless that enthusiast happened to be very wealthy.

Once again, this was an innovation that took Plate Reverb from requiring a walk-in closet sized space, to perhaps the size of a hefty office paper shredder. Unlike the EMT 140, the EMT 250 could do much more than just plate reverb. I would feel safe in suggesting that the EMT 250 was basically a proto effects processor. It was far from what is possible these days, when a high quality effects processor could be the size of a cigar box, and weigh, perhaps, a pound.

I just took delivery of a Stanley FX Abbey Reverb pedal and posted a thread with my impressions. Weighing in at 135 grams, less than 5 ounces, and about the size of a Three Musketeers bar, it’s somewhat easier to bring along to a gig, than the real thing, or even the EMT 250.
 

KreepyTeach

Gretschie
May 27, 2018
144
Brooklyn, Ny
I still love my Volante, tape and drum options sound great, but I love the included spring reverb. I love being able to choose which tapeheads to activate and even how much is sent back to be redelayed?


I recently switched my stereo cab sim to head into the volante, and it sounds even better listening to old clips to new clips.

PSA: cab sims before (tape)delay and reverb!
 


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