Thanks, Curt!

charlie chitlins

Synchromatic
Aug 4, 2008
600
near philly
I recently got my '52 6192 Electro II back from The Man after a neck reset.
It's a whole different instrument now.
It plays like it's all one piece!
I hadn't played it for quite some time because the shifting neck was a bummer.
While it sat, it felt the final effects of "black wire disease" and the crumbling insulation was causing shorts.
Inspection revealed it had been patched up before.
Last night I rewired it completely.
Stripping back a few inches of pickup wire revealed what appeared to be good wire, so I didn't have to do the risky/frightening procedure of replacing the pickup leads altogether.
I am so glad to have this baby back up and running.
All I need now is a few gigs! 20220425_121525.jpg
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
5,538
Where the action is!
I recently got my '52 6192 Electro II back from The Man after a neck reset.
It's a whole different instrument now.
It plays like it's all one piece!
Something that intrigues me is the possibility that an old guitar that seemingly doesn't need a neck reset might very much benefit from having one anyway. I.e., even if the neck isn't moving, the sloppy fit and poor shimming mean that the joint isn't as firm as it could be. I think Curt has suggested as much before. I know that I had the neck of an old guitar come loose once in shipping, and after I had it reset, the tone was noticeably improved, even though the joint seemed solid before. It just sounded brighter and snappier than it did before.
 

TV the Wired Turtle

Gretschified
Jul 25, 2009
14,559
Sandy Eggo
I recently got my '52 6192 Electro II back from The Man after a neck reset.
It's a whole different instrument now.
It plays like it's all one piece!
I hadn't played it for quite some time because the shifting neck was a bummer.
While it sat, it felt the final effects of "black wire disease" and the crumbling insulation was causing shorts.
Inspection revealed it had been patched up before.
Last night I rewired it completely.
Stripping back a few inches of pickup wire revealed what appeared to be good wire, so I didn't have to do the risky/frightening procedure of replacing the pickup leads altogether.
I am so glad to have this baby back up and running.
All I need now is a few gigs! View attachment 180160

I feel the need to sniff this photo.
 

charlie chitlins

Synchromatic
Aug 4, 2008
600
near philly
Something that intrigues me is the possibility that an old guitar that seemingly doesn't need a neck reset might very much benefit from having one anyway. I.e., even if the neck isn't moving, the sloppy fit and poor shimming mean that the joint isn't as firm as it could be. I think Curt has suggested as much before. I know that I had the neck of an old guitar come loose once in shipping, and after I had it reset, the tone was noticeably improved, even though the joint seemed solid before. It just sounded brighter and snappier than it did before.
I imagine a lot of guitars could be improved by tidying up the factory neck set, but I can't imagine doing it just to find out if mine is one of them.
 

charlie chitlins

Synchromatic
Aug 4, 2008
600
near philly
CURT!
I meant to ask.
What's with the plug at the heel?
Isn't there a screw under there?
It doesn't seem to have been disturbed.
Unless you just did a great touch-up, which, I'm sure, is possible.
 


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