Telecaster bridge question...

Discussion in 'Technical Side of Things' started by rockinforJesus, Aug 22, 2020.

  1. bone

    bone Gretschie

    Age:
    120
    232
    Aug 9, 2020
    here
    gorgemous! what does she speak with?
     
  2. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    73
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    Are you asking about the pickups? They are also both hand-wound by my Japanese luthier friend in Osaka.
     
  3. bone

    bone Gretschie

    Age:
    120
    232
    Aug 9, 2020
    here
    that would be correct. thank you. not used to seeing flat poles on a Tele bridge
     
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  4. Stefan

    Stefan Country Gent

    Jan 20, 2016
    Germany
    Staggered polepieces appeared first in 1955 on Telecaster Bridge pickups.
     
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  5. TSims1

    TSims1 Gretschified

    Jun 18, 2013
    Atlanta

    That’s what I like, right there. THAT guitar can do ANYTHING.
     
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  6. G5422T

    G5422T Country Gent

    May 24, 2012
    usa
    I generally agree, and have not compared a Fender bridge to the Callaham bridge on my partscaster.

    Starting from scratch for everything, I've heard far more good comments from Tele nuts about how the tone is as good or better with the Callaham bridge.

    Here's the Callaham description/pitch on their unit.

    https://www.callahamguitars.com/tele_bridge_vintageTmodel_catalog.htm

    It's only about .025 thicker and still a steel material.

    I could fully understand and agree that it may take away from the vintage tone/vibe, if it were made out of brass.

    Splitting hairs between a Fender and a Callaham in some respects, but I do like the lower lip on the treble side, and can only say that my Partscaster sounds "all Tele" to me, with a few improved features.

    Bottom line, a three brass saddle bridge was
    a must have when I built mine.

    20200424_160724.jpg

    My second choice would have been the factory unit with compensated brass saddles.

    Just twangin' away happily.
     
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  7. Stefan

    Stefan Country Gent

    Jan 20, 2016
    Germany
    All those Callaham, Rutters, T-tune or Glendale bridges are top notch products, no doubt.
    One of their main advantages is their stiffness- they‘re completely flat. That adds sustain! A disadvantage is their thickness around the pickup- the typical vintage twang needs the interaction of the thin metal „surrounding“ around the (unpotted) pickup. At least corksniffers say so :p

    Marc Rutters solved that problem:
    EFF6CC00-0987-4FD2-8A01-DEFD0E8897F4.jpeg
    All in all I guess fine saddles are more important. Can‘t go wrong as long as they‘re combined with a plain bridge.

    I wanted an „internally aged“ T-Tune bridge for my new Blackguard, but stumbled over this heavy aged 7ender CS bridge:
    0D5078E5-AD7E-4569-8F2D-A4F7B747770B.jpeg
    This bridge is perfectly flat sanded and a surprisingly lightweight. Look at that edges- that‘s a perfect early 50‘s look!
    The saddles are handmade compensated brass saddles from T-tune.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2020
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  8. G5422T

    G5422T Country Gent

    May 24, 2012
    usa
  9. kpnash

    kpnash Electromatic

    Here's my old and dusty American Deluxe with All Parts Joe Barden bridge, just needs to be careful they have it for two different string spacings. Strangely, it has four holes while American Teles have three. The two outer ones fit perfectly, for the others you might want to drill but I was lazy... The price was a bargain, before I had a stock bridge with graph tech 'string saver' saddles, and replacing it gave a DRAMATIC effect. Okay, to be fair, in the same shot I swapped the strings from nickel wound DAddarios to Thomastic Infeld flats and that obviously gave some contribution too.
    tele.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2020
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  10. DHart

    DHart Synchromatic

    643
    Jun 26, 2019
    Arizona
    I prefer the six-saddle bridges, but the traditional design is "ok". Personally I think more is made of the differences between these than most will ever hear. Especially if there is any overdrive, playing in a band setting, etc.

    If you play alone in your home studio, very clean style, paying very close attention to where there might be an audible difference between the bridges, that can't extremely easily be achieved with a slight tweak to a tone knob, so be it.

    I prefer the more precise intonation that can be achieved with six saddles. As for looks, I like the six saddles as well.

    These are simply personal preferences and I believe you should just do whatever you wish to do, regardless of what I, or anyone else in this thread, has to say.
     
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  11. rockinforJesus

    rockinforJesus Synchromatic

    935
    Nov 7, 2014
    Upstate New York
    Agreed.
    I like to hear other’s opinions too so I can make an informed decision.
    Thanks everyone for your contributions to this thread.
     
  12. rockinforJesus

    rockinforJesus Synchromatic

    935
    Nov 7, 2014
    Upstate New York
    ...so I decided to replace the bridge with the American Professional bridge. As I removed the American Standard bridge I found there is a small strip of double sided tape on the underside of the bridge where the adjusting screws are (tape goes between the body and bridge underside). Anyone know what this is for, and would you recommend transferring the strip to the new bridge?
    Pic’s to come later
     
  13. andreww1962

    andreww1962 Gretschie

    215
    Apr 30, 2019
    Toronto
  14. englishman

    englishman Gretschified

    Age:
    63
    Apr 5, 2014
    Detroit
    The client is. I did a lefty version too.
     
  15. rockinforJesus

    rockinforJesus Synchromatic

    935
    Nov 7, 2014
    Upstate New York
    Wow, just wow.
    I installed the new bridge. More harmonic content, better sustain, and sounds more Tele than it did before I did the upgrade.
    The old bridge only had 3 hold-down screws, and the new one has 4+2 screws, so I had to drill 2 additional holes at the bottom and 2 at the top. All the string holes lined up perfectly.
    I am very happy with this upgrade and would recommend it to anyone wanting to upgrade their American Standard bridge to a more traditional setup.
    Oh, and intonation is spot on, the small ashtray cover is perfect to rest your hand on, and the cut down side of the bridge has enough of a lip to anchor my pinky on it.
    Happy camper.

    Before:
    A1747E84-9C0C-4CF4-B0F3-C98788E6C6C8.jpeg

    ...and after:
    4915ABEE-7912-4C6C-883D-EC345A7FD9B1.jpeg 9CDFBCE9-2435-4AAB-B05E-D63B6060E47B.jpeg CBBE1FA6-D70C-4087-A1CF-120AC4958915.jpeg F682FB62-C7E4-4912-8DCD-22C8651F79A9.jpeg
     
  16. G5422T

    G5422T Country Gent

    May 24, 2012
    usa
    Great to hear that you like it.

    Nice job, looks GOOD!
     
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  17. Lacking Talent

    Lacking Talent Synchromatic

    948
    Aug 5, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    I like that mini ashtray so much that I might take up smoking.
     
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  18. DHart

    DHart Synchromatic

    643
    Jun 26, 2019
    Arizona
    Kind of a cool, different look. Nice. Glad you're happy, which is all that matters.
     
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  19. larryr

    larryr Synchromatic

    529
    Mar 6, 2012
    Camarillo, Ca.
    20201014_213805~2.jpg
    New Schroeder tele Bridge installed. It is like a piece of jewelry. My luthier says it dialed in intonation wise much better than the hip shot with Rutter's saddles.
     
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