Talk about generational differences

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Bertotti, Jun 21, 2021.

  1. Bertotti

    Bertotti Friend of Fred

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    My daughter and I watched Tom Sawyer a couple of nights ago. She enjoyed it, it was the one with Johnny Whittaker and Jodi Foster. It got me reminiscing a bit. I grew up close to the Mississippi and even closer to the Cedar rivers in Iowa. My time in the timber was very much like Tom Sawyer. We found abandoned stills, and cars leftover from prohibition, in my HS days you had to be a bit more cautious because drugs were seriously picking up and my county was the worst in the state, it was a very ruff town under the surface which was odd because at one point it was in the top ten cities to retire to, most of us non-druggy kids blamed a circuit judge we were sure was a ring leader. It was also odd to see how it changed over a very short time. My first year stationed in California was odd because at the time there were more murders in a 50-mile radius around my home than in the orange county area I was in, MCAS El Toro.

    I was telling my kids and wife how we could go entire summers without eating at home. My mom was worried I wasn't eating at one time but she worked so didn't always notice. They did notice grocery bills go up in the winter months. As kids, we lived in the timber and playing in the cricks, rivers, and streams around our house. We ate bullhead, catfish, wild onion, potatoes, garden fare as well, and berries of all sorts every day. Not to mention Morrell mushrooms when the season permitted. Yes, we would make a campfire and cook some of our food drink out of the cricks, the rivers were too dirty the cricks were very clear but probably had some critter flavor in them, you just didn't think about that. My kids think it's just incredibly odd and have no idea how someone could do this. Even my wife who was a city girl finds it a bit strange even though her dad would bring fish home almost daily, they were not very well off and fish was free when you caught it. Talk about times having changed. I could easily go live in the forests, even now, and never come out. Probably be much happier as well. I can honestly say once I got out of Sioux Falls and into the country I was much happier, and Sioux Falls is actually a pretty nice town but slowly getting big-city problems. But kids now, wow, even my son's friends make little to no attempt to connect over the summer, instead, holing up in their houses and spending time with online games. They do have friends all online and some of his school friends are online as well so they do get some social interaction but from my POV it is odd because we were very much in the world while today people are very much out of the world and online.

    Now for the kicker, I was quite happy when everyone seemed to be staying home more, shopping more with home delivery, not that that happened a lot in SD but with some big companies shut down the roads were clearer, and being a person who is out and about every day it was a breath of fresh air. I can't wait until more people start working from home so I can have the streets to myself!

    Get off my lawn! hhahaa
     
  2. afire

    afire Country Gent

    This David Attenborough documentary (Apple+) sort of on that topic, "The Year The Earth Changed," is worth watching. It's short, lacks any discernible agenda that could offend anybody, and fascinating.
    [​IMG]
     
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  3. guitarfarm

    guitarfarm Country Gent


    I grew up in the Appalachian Mountains of western Pennsylvania and have very similar experiences. Right out my backdoor was at least three mountains with very little on them except ski slopes which were empty in the summer. Very easy to be four or five hours from the nearest highway or house. My friends and I would roam those mountains all day and never come home until dinner time. Following ancient wagon trails that had long grown over. Exploring abandoned coal mines. All while waist deep in rattlesnakes. My Mom was always worried because she knew if something happened nobody might ever find the bodies. At the time I thought she was overreacting like mothers will do, but looking back now she may have had a point.

    Compared to children nowadays my friends and I basically grew up feral. It's a small wonder none of us were ever killed doing some of the crazy things we did. Plenty of scars and a few broken bones to show for it, but I would do it all over again.
     
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  4. AZBrahma

    AZBrahma Gretschie

    274
    Dec 18, 2020
    Arizona
    Spent a lot of time doing everything you describe in the Blue Ridges. I loved every second of it. I acquit myself equally well in the big city. But as I get older I want nothing to do with the city anymore, aside from an occasional visit to bask in the diversity and cultural centers. These days there is both too much crime, and too many self-righteous egomaniacs who think they have all the answers to all the problems of all the people in the world despite rarely if ever leaving their city. Given the choice, I'd disappear into the woods myself. Right now that's not feasible, but maybe soon enough...
     
  5. thunder58

    thunder58 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    62
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    Admin Post
    I grew up during " The Wonder Years " .....wouldn't change a thing
     
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  6. mr coffee

    mr coffee Country Gent

    Oct 7, 2009
    Houston
    Growing up in the 80s, I was a city kid. Even though I wasn't the most social kid, I hung out plenty with the kids around the neighborhood. We rode bikes and skateboards, everybody had Star Wars and GI Joe action figures, we all watched the same stuff on TV, we all walked to and from school together. Every kid's mom was willing to feed another kid lunch. We got in fights, made up games with stupid rules, we laughed at each other and with each other, and called each other out when somebody went too far. The parents all kept an eye open. One family had a pool, another had a trampoline. Some yards had nicer grass and better shade trees. Sometimes we'd go to the arcade. One family in the neighborhood always had the ridiculous amount of fireworks for July 4. But yeah, we were always out and around doing things. When I was about 15, I moved and changed gears a little, guitars and BBSes and Nintendo. The BBS crowd was pretty social, the local SysOps had friendly rivalry going on, and the users would get together for board games, card games, bonfires, drinking, and just kicking around...I still had my own little circle, we roamed the streets of Flint acting like hooligans.

    My son plays Xbox.

    -m
     
  7. Bertotti

    Bertotti Friend of Fred

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    Funny thing is Tom Sawyer was my summers and weekends but during the school year as a junior and senior it was more like Breakfast club. I dressed like the burnout had friends in almost every click was completely socially awkward and wrestled varsity from the first day I walked out on the mat. I watch the Show Breakfast club and think wow it was so realistic. Most everyone fell into one of those clicks. I was the odd guy not nor really in any click and when able out in the timber because in our town the kids basically hung out or had keggers and I wasn’t into drugs or alcohol. Woods was better.
     
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  8. Although i did not spend my days in the woods, as there were not many in Bergen County NJ, the few that still existed contained the kids you didnt go near as they were up to no good, i did spend almost all of my day away from my house. Would leave in the morning on my bike(the pedal kind, Schwin Stingray with a large shifter 3 speed banana seat, and after saving up, a cissy bar, which for those that dont know was a seat extension bar that allowed you to sit upright like a back rest, but no one used it for that as it was uncomfortable. It was all about the look) and on some days come back for a lunch bite if not come back at dinner. Eat dinner, then go out again until it got dark, and as i got older, maybe a little later. Parents had no idea what we did, as long as it didnt get back to them and we were home by dinner. So i have a touch of that Tom Sawyer thing in that aspect, but i didnt get people to paint a fence for me.
     
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  9. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    Mayberry for me, won't be duplicated.
     
  10. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    71
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Grew up in the '50s and ;60s. While we lived just outside of city limits, my life was closer to Ralphie's in "A Christmas Story", which takes place not far from where I lived in northern Indiana. Got the BB gun when I was 8, too. We lived half a mile from city limits in a virgin oak forest. Gravel roads, no sidewalks, no city amenities like water or sewer. We were on an 8 party phone line. Luckily, there was a grocery store 1/4 mile away, and I got to walk the 1-1/2 miles to school daily along a 2 lane state hiway (uphill both ways, in 4 feet of snow. Ticked my daughter off when she found out I wasn't joking about that). We listened to radio before we got a TV in '52. Literally lived in a hole in the ground---our basement--- for three or four years. Dad built our house, and did the upstairs when Studebaker was on lay-offs or on strike (slim times). Once we were up in the main house, they got me a $25 piano. Haven't been the same since. In summer, folks couldn't keep us indoors. Having a paper route meant I was outside everyday, rain, shine, snow, etc. Made decent money for a kid raking leaves and shoveling snow. We were too busy to get into much trouble.

    We lived near our large family, thankfully. People didn't go out in public much due to the polio epidemic, so, family was close. There was enough variety in the family that you didn't often have to go to outsiders for services. My Dad fixed TVs and radios, and did carpentry and plumbing. Others took care of other services. Kept things close to home. Worked in my Grandfather's grocery store, and then at a root beer stand, and later at a drive in theater. My Dad was big on work. Best part of summer was going to the lake. Lived close enough to a local one we could ride bikes there. Best was going 25 miles to Lake Michigan for the day with the folks.

    I had a great time in Scouts. Went from Cubs to Explorers. Camping, fishing, and so on. Stopped at Life because of school and work. I've heard the horror stories, but we had no problems in any of our groups. We had a great mix of city and country to choose from as kids---the best of both worlds.

    I feel sorry for kids today in ways. We could be out till dark, traipsing around the area on bikes. We'd spend all day outside, only coming home when we were hungry. Lots of guys I knew had .22/410 combos, or single shot .22 squirrel guns. All of us had fishing gear. Kids' lives now are so controlled compared to ours, tho that's probably safer for them. Still, the loss of innocence is sad. We didn't have the internet, tho I spent a lot of time at the library. Read a lot in the winter. Barely had three or four channels on TV, with no VCRs or DVDs. Can't miss something we never had. Reminds me of the lyric in the Carly Simon tune---"These are the good old days."
     
  11. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    73
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    I never grew up, I just deteriorated slowly......
     
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  12. mr coffee

    mr coffee Country Gent

    Oct 7, 2009
    Houston
    This sounds a lot like my dad. I always liked listening to him talk about the things he would do as a kid.

    -m
     
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  13. Back in Black

    Back in Black Country Gent

    Age:
    72
    Jun 22, 2020
    Ontario Canada
    Slim,

    We're really getting old!

    There was a neighbor who lived on the corner...Old Mr. Moran. Then, he was probably younger than I am now. He grew these big flowers in his front yard, that we would ball up, and stuff into the barrel ends of our air rifles.

    After the guns were ''loaded'', we would position ourselves in our favorite sitting stance on Mr. Moran's front lawn, and shoot at cars that passed by.

    After an hour, the flower bush was picked clean, and the road in front of the house was covered with balled up flower remnants.

    It was fun, we all laughed...nobody cared. This would have been late 1950's.

    I don't think I'd want to try that today. I would not want to walk around any neighborhoods today with toy guns.

    How did we ever get from there to here???

    And some have the nerve to call it progress.

    My wife and I walked to our pharmacy yesterday afternoon (downtown Ottawa, ByWard Market area). among the items on our list was Listerine, I like the original amber type. There was a note in the mouthwash isle...''original Listerine is behind the counter at checkout, please ask cashier''. I did, got my Listerine, and me being me, just had to ask ''WHY''...the cashier told me, ''the homeless'' come into the store, steal it, and drink it....They have a full time uniformed guard on duty...a pharmacy...

    progress....Dystopia, just around the next corner.

    BIB.
     
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  14. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    71
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    We had a couple of old timers in our neighborhood, too. Mr. Marks was the kindly old gent that was a friend to all the kids. He'd put flowers on every doorstep in the neighborhood every Easter. Grandpa Ratts (real last name) was just the opposite. He would throw rocks at you, and if you rode too close, he'd stick his cane in your spokes. Nice guy. He wouldn't bother me or my brother much or we wouldn't deliver his paper to him.

    Having worked in a number of grocery stores, I'm well aware of the pilfering. Small stores didn't have that issue too much, but the larger ones did. One smaller store I worked at kept the beer near the rear exit. Owner never did figure out why it disappeared so fast. He had other issues beyond that, like dealing with the health dept.

    Listerine? I had a buddy who lived on Geritol and vanilla extract all thru high school.
     
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  15. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    71
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    My Dad was born in 1924. At his funeral, I heard stories about what he and his brothers were like as kids. He would've grounded me for life if I'd done some of the stuff. he got away with. They'd send the youngest into a bar, and a fight would start. The other four would come in and finish it. I did inherit his penchant for humor. He had two jokes for every occasion---one clean, one dirty. He'd make English/Polish puns. Jack of all trades, mastered most of them.
     
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  16. mr coffee

    mr coffee Country Gent

    Oct 7, 2009
    Houston
    Our neighborhood had its characters. I don't remember his name, but there was the cranky old codger who didn't like the neighborhood kids playing anywhere within earshot. There was old Mr. Turek who got my dad into radio and stuff, that guy knew a little bit of everything and a lot of quite a few things. There was my friend Chuck's family, dad said they'd always been there and had never had much; the old man would collect scrap and fix bicycles & lawn mowers. He was gone - dead, ran off, I don't know - by they time I met Chuck; his uncles fixed cars and motorcycles in the back yard, place looked like a junkyard. One summer, his uncle Cam was in a body cast after getting hit by a car while out riding his motorcycle. I guess we were sort of one of the older families in the neighborhood, since we bought the house from Grampa, even though dad hadn't lived there since he got out of school.

    Oh yeah, and fun with BB guns....quite a few of us had them, and we weren't always the smartest or safest with them.

    -m
     
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  17. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    [QUOTE="Oh yeah, and fun with BB guns....quite a few of us had them, and we weren't always the smartest or safest with them.
    -m[/QUOTE]
    When I was ten I discovered that a BB hole in the upstairs window of my neighbor's garage was glaringly obvious, but after I shot out all of the glass you really couldn't tell...
     
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  18. Bertotti

    Bertotti Friend of Fred

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    BbGun wars. It is a miracle we all didn’t loose an eye!
     
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  19. Robbie

    Robbie Friend of Fred

    Age:
    68
    Jun 17, 2013
    Sarnia Ontario Canada
    In the late 50’s early 60’s I grew up in a brand new neighbourhood in the suburbs. We were likely the 2nd or 3rd house in that area. For years there was nothing but open field and creeks. I was gone from sun up to sunset. I’m not sure today could be considered an improvement on that but times change.
     
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  20. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    You must have lived in the home of tomorrow:
    [​IMG]
     
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