Sexy Thinline Guitars

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,707
Tucson
I know that this will probably get me lobotomized, but I saw a video about the Gibson Tennessean a while back, and see some merit in the model. It's basically a 335, with a single cutaway. It's a strange axe, but I see the appeal.
 

mister rain

Synchromatic
Apr 23, 2020
818
new orleans
I know that this will probably get me lobotomized, but I saw a video about the Gibson Tennessean a while back, and see some merit in the model. It's basically a 335, with a single cutaway. It's a strange axe, but I see the appeal.
i always had a hankering for a gibson chet or tenny, ever since robert smith used them in the early 90s.

then i tried a gretsch…
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,707
Tucson
i always had a hankering for a gibson chet or tenny, ever since robert smith used them in the early 90s.

then i tried a gretsch…
IMO, the Gibson Chet Atkins guitars and the Gretsch Chet Atkins guitars are very different from one another. I understand that Gibson actually used an under-wound humbucker, at least for the neck position, on the Chet models, but that doesn't really address the issue. Had they wanted a Gretsch sound, they would have been better off with mini-humbuckers, which have closer bobbin spacing and would probably sound more like Filters. The Gibson Gent was an ok guitar, but much more a Gibson sound. In some ways, it suited what Chet was doing, because by the mid '80s, he was moving away from the classic fingerstyle and more towards sort of a Fusion type of thing.

I have an Epi Dot, that I sort of babysit, and have to say that I love the sound and feel, but my G6119-1959 has a lot more life in it, than a 335. That having been said, I think that the 335 is an important guitar, and one of a few non-Gretsch that I consider to be nearly essential. A 335 can cover the Gibson electric Jazz sound, or wail like a Les Paul. It was a major innovation 64 years ago, and is still a very relevant guitar. I'd probably take on over a Les Paul, at this point in time It's sort of like the best traits of an ES-175 and a Les Paul, in one guitar.
 

GlenP

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jul 23, 2019
2,566
WA
I know that this will probably get me lobotomized, but I saw a video about the Gibson Tennessean a while back, and see some merit in the model. It's basically a 335, with a single cutaway. It's a strange axe, but I see the appeal.
I think The Heritage had a single cut version of their Roy Clark signature model. Similar to a 335 single cut.
 

mister rain

Synchromatic
Apr 23, 2020
818
new orleans
IMO, the Gibson Chet Atkins guitars and the Gretsch Chet Atkins guitars are very different from one another. I understand that Gibson actually used an under-wound humbucker, at least for the neck position, on the Chet models, but that doesn't really address the issue. Had they wanted a Gretsch sound, they would have been better off with mini-humbuckers, which have closer bobbin spacing and would probably sound more like Filters. The Gibson Gent was an ok guitar, but much more a Gibson sound. In some ways, it suited what Chet was doing, because by the mid '80s, he was moving away from the classic fingerstyle and more towards sort of a Fusion type of thing.

I have an Epi Dot, that I sort of babysit, and have to say that I love the sound and feel, but my G6119-1959 has a lot more life in it, than a 335. That having been said, I think that the 335 is an important guitar, and one of a few non-Gretsch that I consider to be nearly essential. A 335 can cover the Gibson electric Jazz sound, or wail like a Les Paul. It was a major innovation 64 years ago, and is still a very relevant guitar. I'd probably take on over a Les Paul, at this point in time It's sort of like the best traits of an ES-175 and a Les Paul, in one guitar.
mine - a late 70s yamaha copy, all mahogany - served me very, very well through my late 20s and all through my 30s. so much so that a few years back i picked up a peerless epi sheraton ii. also just a fantastic instrument - the best i ever owned. until my 6120de-tb, that is.

and looking back? i always struggled to get paf’s to sound good for me. that’s why there was always a jazzmaster around.

i still kinda miss 335s - but not the weight. or the paf’s. so these days i’d probably go with a 5622… or one of those cats eye 5620’s… yeah, black single cut? yup.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,707
Tucson
I think The Heritage had a single cut version of their Roy Clark signature model. Similar to a 335 single cut.
Not bad.

11355B98-AB97-4A0C-9D09-CF2BE7A9E5CE.jpeg
mine - a late 70s yamaha copy, all mahogany - served me very, very well through my late 20s and all through my 30s. so much so that a few years back i picked up a peerless epi sheraton ii. also just a fantastic instrument - the best i ever owned. until my 6120de-tb, that is.

and looking back? i always struggled to get paf’s to sound good for me. that’s why there was always a jazzmaster around.

i still kinda miss 335s - but not the weight. or the paf’s. so these days i’d probably go with a 5622… or one of those cats eye 5620’s… yeah, black single cut? yup.
Those Peerless-built Epi Sheratons were great. I wish I had struck while the iron was hot.

Gibson Humbuckers are sort of a conundrum, for me. For some things, they are unbeatable, but for other things they are harsh, or even muddy.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,707
Tucson
Thinlines don’t get sexier than this:



74B34903-69AB-4710-A90A-17E4390FD155.jpeg
Guild GSR T-400. Mine is allegedly the last one built. I chose the picture, above, because it shows off the thinness of the body to best advantage. 17” wide by 2” deep is very svelte.

A72D8D86-BEB2-435E-9658-0E871BC7C642.jpeg

That is my actual guitar, with a Compton Bridge and a Chet arm. The sound runs the gamut, from very warm to very bright. The pickup spacing is pretty much as wide as is possible.

6609TDC Flame maple, Bourbon stain, 1.75”

View attachment 187667
That is a beautiful color.
 

GlenP

Country Gent
Double Platinum Member
Jul 23, 2019
2,566
WA
Not bad.


Those Peerless-built Epi Sheratons were great. I wish I had struck while the iron was hot.

Gibson Humbuckers are sort of a conundrum, for me. For some things, they are unbeatable, but for other things they are harsh, or even muddy.
They could have released a double-signature model for both Roy Clark & Glen Campbell, that would be a hoot:



6609TDC Flame maple, Bourbon stain, 1.75”

View attachment 187667
Yes, please, I'll have what he's having! Helping the GAS you are NOT!
 

afire

Friend of Fred
Feb 12, 2009
5,982
Where the action is!
I would consider the 1957-1961 Gretsch Country Gentleman the apex predator of the thinline guitar world:
CIMG3433.jpg

Outside of Gretsch, I would nominate the Gibson ES-355 as the most striking looking thinline:
custom-shop-chuck-berry-es-355-1970s-eb-hd-182399.jpg

But since I don't like Gibson pickups, I would lean towards a different non-Gretsch option, the Guild DE-500:
bgbecsovzizemglj7huk.jpg
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,707
Tucson
They could have released a double-signature model for both Roy Clark & Glen Campbell, that would be a hoot:

That was a hoot. I sorta like that guitar.
I would consider the 1957-1961 Gretsch Country Gentleman the apex predator of the thinline guitar world:
CIMG3433.jpg

Outside of Gretsch, I would nominate the Gibson ES-355 as the most striking looking thinline:
custom-shop-chuck-berry-es-355-1970s-eb-hd-182399.jpg

But since I don't like Gibson pickups, I would lean towards a different non-Gretsch option, the Guild DE-500:
bgbecsovzizemglj7huk.jpg
I have to agree on all counts. The single cutaway Gent is definitely the T-Rex of the thinline world.

The 335 family is a great design, and the 355 is a step beyond. A level of trim that is right up there with an L-5, on a sleek center block guitar.

I’ve made peace with Gibson Humbuckers, but I don’t prefer them for everything. Actually, my favorite non-Filtertron-family pickup is the Guild mini humbucker. It’s like a Filtertron’s cousin, visiting from another state. There is a degree of similarity, but a degree of difference, as well.

The DE 500 is an excellent choice. That family of Duane Eddy Guilds is too often overlooked.
Just a sick joke. That’s a great looking guitar. I was just making an imbecilic joke about the beautiful wood grain.
 


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