Revisiting Olde Guitar-Shaped Friends

Andrew Griffin

Synchromatic
Oct 22, 2015
811
Having 13 guitars is a blessing. I collected most of them during a period when the prices were reasonable and I had the disposable income to work with. But there’s a downside, in that some guitars get played more than others. I have no idea why, but it seems to be cyclical. In the past few weeks, I’ve made an effort to be some reacquainted with all of them. Two weeks ago, I gave special attention to my Guid T-400, and tonight, my G6120 DC was on the receiving end of some attention

The Guild, through the right amp, and with the right amount of reverb, is just amazing. It seems to love the Tweed tone stack in my Tremor, and loves plate reverb. The 6120 DC, is just such a delight to play, lightweight and with the sweetest playing neck I’ve ever experienced.

How about the rest of y’all; do you ever pick up a neglected guitar and wonder why it’s not played more often?
Yes, and it's probably my 6120 that gets played the least. When I play it I'm always so satisfied, but it's such a nice guitar and I'm worried about banging it up, so I play my banged up ones more. And, honestly, I enjoy playing my New Yorker just as much. And my Streamliner 2420. They have such different tones and there's a time I want to hear each. Sometimes a guitar will sound good to me at one time of day and poor at another. My Atavar is my blue resonator, which either sounds heavenly and deep or like an angry banjo. So I rotate, and it's fun.
Having 13 guitars is a blessing. I collected most of them during a period when the prices were reasonable and I had the disposable income to work with. But there’s a downside, in that some guitars get played more than others. I have no idea why, but it seems to be cyclical. In the past few weeks, I’ve made an effort to be some reacquainted with all of them. Two weeks ago, I gave special attention to my Guid T-400, and tonight, my G6120 DC was on the receiving end of some attention

The Guild, through the right amp, and with the right amount of reverb, is just amazing. It seems to love the Tweed tone stack in my Tremor, and loves plate reverb. The 6120 DC, is just such a delight to play, lightweight and with the sweetest playing neck I’ve ever experienced.

How about the rest of y’all; do you ever pick up a neglected guitar and wonder why it’s not played more often?
Having 13 guitars is a blessing. I collected most of them during a period when the prices were reasonable and I had the disposable income to work with. But there’s a downside, in that some guitars get played more than others. I have no idea why, but it seems to be cyclical. In the past few weeks, I’ve made an effort to be some reacquainted with all of them. Two weeks ago, I gave special attention to my Guid T-400, and tonight, my G6120 DC was on the receiving end of some attention

The Guild, through the right amp, and with the right amount of reverb, is just amazing. It seems to love the Tweed tone stack in my Tremor, and loves plate reverb. The 6120 DC, is just such a delight to play, lightweight and with the sweetest playing neck I’ve ever experienced.

How about the rest of y’all; do you ever pick up a neglected guitar and wonder why it’s not played more often?
 

gtttrrr

Country Gent
Dec 7, 2011
2,175
United States
Yes, and it's probably my 6120 that gets played the least. When I play it I'm always so satisfied, but it's such a nice guitar and I'm worried about banging it up, so I play my banged up ones more. And, honestly, I enjoy playing my New Yorker just as much. And my Streamliner 2420. They have such different tones and there's a time I want to hear each. Sometimes a guitar will sound good to me at one time of day and poor at another. My Atavar is my blue resonator, which either sounds heavenly and deep or like an angry banjo. So I rotate, and it's fun.
Bang em’ up…. Who wants to die with perfect guitars that they were too afraid to play ???🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤘🤘🤘🤘🤘🤘🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤘🤘🤘🤷‍♂️😬😬😬
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,853
Tucson
Last night, I spent more quality time with the 6120 DC, played through my Winfield Tremor, which is probably the best amp in existence, for my tastes. Just add some plate reverb, and this rig sounded just about perfect, for Rockabilly and Instrumental Rock sounds. There was only one thing that could be done in such a situation; play Jazz and Bossa Novas. :) If that wasn’t bizarre enough, I finished off with some Mozart. However, before that, there was a lot of Classic Rock, Blues, Chet Style, etc.
 

guitarfarm

Country Gent
Dec 29, 2008
1,339
Neither here nor there...
Been doing this for years. And every time I pick up one that I haven't played in months, I find myself wondering why I let it sit so long. It's like having multiple girlfriends in different cities (something I haven't had in a very long time, but I used to).
 

BCRatRod73

Synchromatic
Sep 1, 2020
729
Mississippi
I won't buy a pre-reliced guitar. I'll add that aging myself happily.
A reliced guitar is akin to a hipster getting tattoos. But if people want to pay for the fake wear and tear it’s their money. I take good care of my guitars but things do happen. Little bumps and bruises tell a story and add to the guitar’s character.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,568
lafayette in
A reliced guitar is akin to a hipster getting tattoos. But if people want to pay for the fake wear and tear it’s their money. I take good care of my guitars but things do happen. Little bumps and bruises tell a story and add to the guitar’s character.
Copying a star's guitar is meaningless. It's obviously not the star's personal instrument. You didn't create the wear and tear. It's all so dishonest.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
17,568
lafayette in
I liked ‘em pointy when I was young. In 48 years of marriage my wife’s gone from that to Gibson round shouldered jumbo. I haven’t fared much better. I’ve gone from Jaguar svelte to double bass.
True for me as well. Mrs. Slim and I are no longer slim.
She's a good cook, and 46 years takes a toll on things.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,853
Tucson
Copying a star's guitar is meaningless. It's obviously not the star's personal instrument. You didn't create the wear and tear. It's all so dishonest.
At some point, it goes from being practical, into being something else, entirely. I can understand, entirely, wanting a guitar of similar specification to that of the guitar one of our heroes played. That makes sense. If I want to perform music similar to Jim Hall, it would make sense to use a guitar similar in specification to his. That won’t make me sound like Jim Hall, by any means, but it is an appropriate tool for creating that sound. If a master carpenter uses a Plumb Rigging Axe, buying one will not give me the skills of a master carpenter, but if I’m trying to gain those skills, the proper tools will only help.

I can also understand desiring to have a replica of a famous player’s personal instrument. But for me, that is a different matter. That’s more of a collectible, and I could see having something like that as a curiosity, but nothing more.

In my days, I’ve played some historically significant instruments. I have played the guitar upon which I believe the solo on Green Eyed Lady was played. It was a lovely instrument and played beautifully. I’ve played Johnny Smith’s Epiphone Triumph, and one of Hank Garland’s Byrdlands. All were beautiful instruments and truly, I felt it a privilege to play them, but there was no “mojo” within the guitars themselves. Other than the fact that all three of these were well setup, I didn’t attach any particular value to them, beyond the interesting history. Provenance means nothing to me, when it comes to the price I would pay for an instrument. By the way, in tne case of these three instruments, all were in excellent condition, and in no way resembled a “relic”.

4CE05BC2-035A-4AC6-AE3E-0046DCDB97CC.jpeg

Byrdland Once Owned By Hank Garland
The only exception I have, with regard to provenance, would be a guitar formerly owned by a personal friend.

Among my collection, is a functional duplicate of Chet Atkins’ ‘59 Country Gentleman. This is a modern guitar, based upon the specs of Chet’s Gent, but doesn’t try to pass itself off as being a clone of the wear and tear of Chet’s well-used original. As a tool for recreating Chet’s sound, it’s quite effective, but that’s all I’ll say for it. I’m happy to have it, but it’s just a good guitar, and once again, there’s no “mojo” involved.

Occasionally, I watch a show called Graveyard Cars, about a shop that restored classic Mopars. It’s interesting, and I love some of these classic vehicles, but the extent they go to in replicating every assembly line marking, etc. strikes me as borderline idolatry. I understand the goal of replicating something from the past, but sometimes it’s almost as if they are trying to relive a moment from the past, and IMO, that’s a fruitless pursuit.

As far as my Gent is concerned, I’d be no happier with Chet’s actual ‘59 than I am with my G-6122-1959. The sound is very close, and I’d much rather that Chet’s guitar be in a museum, where many others can enjoy it.
 


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