Physcological Guitar Problems

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Mr Swisher, Sep 19, 2021.

  1. afire

    afire Country Gent

    And you will again, so there's that too.
     
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  2. Stefan87

    Stefan87 Country Gent

    May 20, 2019
    Brisbane, Australia
    Well that's a shame but fantastic on the shops behalf.

    You will get that 335 you dream of one day.
     
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  3. Mr Swisher

    Mr Swisher Synchromatic

    914
    Jun 12, 2012
    England
    You know what.. the buzz of placing the order was still greater than today's dissapointment so its all good.
     
  4. BuddyHollywood

    BuddyHollywood Gretschie

    269
    Sep 11, 2009
    Venice, CA
    I just put together a parts Telecaster that I loved all of the components of but together it's just not inspiring me, yet. I'm going to give it some time, possibly change out the nut, figure out where the wiring is wrong and get the neck angle adjusted perfectly but I'm feeling that feeling right now.
     
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  5. Sid Nitzerglobin

    Sid Nitzerglobin Country Gent

    Jun 8, 2015
    fROMOHIO
    I definitely have been victim of a guitar being "too nice" for me to play it all the time or even enough to justify having bought it in the first place. Worst was probably the Deusey Caribou, it was a very nice playing & sounding guitar but the degree of inspiration I wound up feeling from it couldn't over come the feeling that I didn't want to mess it up leaving it out of the case or taking it out of the house or even playing it w/ any frequency.

    I feel some of the same kind of thing w/ the CDG Penguin, but I think it clicks significantly better for me than the Caribou all around so that probably helps. Also bought it used albeit in fairly minty condition, so that likely plays a part as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2021
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  6. THISISDINOSAUR

    THISISDINOSAUR Electromatic

    76
    Oct 21, 2019
    London
    Does a headstock break count as a physiological problem? Either way it's all in the head
     
  7. TSims1

    TSims1 Gretschified

    Jun 18, 2013
    Atlanta
    I have actually had this very issue with some of my past Gretsch guitars. I buy them, and they are Cadillacs. Just amazing and beautiful and expensive and….well I just don’t wanna ding it. Or scrape it. Or bump it into something. And it makes me not wanna gig with it because it will sustain live battle damage. So I sell. Lol
     
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  8. AZBrahma

    AZBrahma Gretschie

    401
    Dec 18, 2020
    Arizona
    I almost have the 'too pretty' problem with my Schecter Solo II Classic. It has a flame top, which I don't care for and would have rather had a plain or mineral-streaked top. But, that's just the way they built 'em so I didn't ask for a substitution. As they were sanding the top carve, they found a little birthmark in the top that had been hidden. They reached out to me to see if I wanted them to rebuild it because it wasn't perfect. I said no way, I like the character mark! So now I have a little unique identifier in the top of my guitar that prevents it from being flawless, and I like it much better that way.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2021
  9. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I have a self-talk tech technique that helps me to deal with such things. First-off, I ask myself if there is a real problem, right now. The principle here is to never accept a real problem, as a trade for an imaginary problem. The neck on that 335 might never give you an ounce of trouble. It’s a risk, but it’s not a problem, and it is, ultimately, repairable.

    That brings me to the second half of how I deal with something like this; I accept the loss, mentally, ahead of the fact. In this case, I would say something to myself, on the order of; “I really like this guitar, and if I have to pay some serious money in the future to preserve its playability, I’ll do so, without regret. In most cases, the loss never happens, and I can proceed with my goal of a low-grief lifestyle.
     
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  10. Mr Swisher

    Mr Swisher Synchromatic

    914
    Jun 12, 2012
    England
    Wise words.

    I think the issue was made worse because it was a big purchase. I could afford it, but I still understand the value of money, and as much as guitar is very very important to me. It's still just playing guitar.

    You are right though, I need to make these purchases guilt-free with knowledge that it's not an investment, its not a long-term "rent" to recoup one day. It's a guitar, to own and enjoy, to bond with and if things happen, to put them right and enjoy it some more.
     
  11. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    IMHO, & FWIW, that’s the thing. If you buy guitars to make money, you will probably be disappointed. Yes, guitars have appreciated and had you owned a pro level instrument in the ‘70s, you would have turned a profit had you held onto it for long enough. But, people started jumping on that bandwagon in droves and pretty soon, everyone was collecting guitars. Supply and demand rule the day, and with all of these “collectable” instruments, there is an ample supply. At best, guitars might be a hedge against inflation, but you are unlikely to make much profit, once inflation has been factored in.
     
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  12. BuddyHollywood

    BuddyHollywood Gretschie

    269
    Sep 11, 2009
    Venice, CA
    [​IMG]
     
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