Old names for items

audept

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Dec 1, 2010
28,882
Sydney, Australia
How many of you can still drive a manual shift transmission?
The theater I worked at got a manual shift van, and there were only two of us that could drive it.
Recently, an attempted car theft in Australia was foiled when 2 young thieves broke into a car in a supermarket carpark. When they gained entry they realized it was a manual gearshift and neither of them could work out how to drive it. The cops who turned up and arrested them were highly amused. :D
 

Teledriver

Synchromatic
Feb 12, 2011
918
Iowa City, IA
I think more kids (boys) will be able to drive manual transitions, only because you can get the hardware for gaming consoles and PC driving games. Those expensive add-ons for games do make it fun!
My mom and dad always referred to the Davenport. But if I was sitting there and needed to move my feet when she vacuumed (Hoover, as the Brits say), then I was told to "get off the sofa". No explanation given and I just grew up knowing there were multiple names for the same things.
Mom refers to the garage door remote as the 'beeper'. Maybe because the first Genie model they had in the 70s actually kinda beeped.
Mom refers to the TV remote as the clicker. I remember some of them did actually click.
Mom called me with a problem with the red poppers a few years ago.




Yeah, took me that long too. She was referring to the GFI wall plug had 'popped' and hers has red paint on the sides that show when it pops out (mine do not and have a red LED that lights instead).

For the Brits-
Mrs. Teledriver and I enjoy watching 'Escape to the Country' from the UK on one of our cable channels. We often chuckle about the WC (water closet) and the snug (we call it a living room or actually, a den).
The Brits also refer to a flat. What's flat about an apartment??:D
 

dspellman

Gretschie
Jul 4, 2020
212
Los Angeles
So how about the couch, anyone have family who called it the davenport? Why? Was it a brand name at the time that stuck?

Yup. A "davenport" describes a piece of upholstered furniture big enough to lie down on that was made and named by the Davenport Furniture Company in Massachusetts. The company (now out of business, I think) was so popular in its day that the name stuck. Like Kleenex, it was a brand name that described a generic item. My parents called ours a davenport all the time.

A Chesterfield is a different thing -- usually an older tufted-upholstery dave...er..couch.

As for breakfast lunch and dinner, those are pretty common usage. I've never heard lunch called "the noon meal."
 

Teledriver

Synchromatic
Feb 12, 2011
918
Iowa City, IA
Yeah, Xerox became so common-place that making a paper copy on a copier was always refered to as 'make a xerox' even though it was some other brand. That 'xerox' reference didn't last that long, maybe only 14 years or so. No one says it now. Just like the Brits say 'Hoover' for vaccuum. Could also say 'that was photoshopped' even though Photoshop wasn't the actual program used to alter the image.
 

Ktone

Electromatic
Oct 31, 2021
69
SE PA USA
There’s lots of old medical terms we don’t use any more:

dropsy (congestive heart failure)
Quinsy (tonsillitis)
Apoplexy (stroke)
Ague (influenza)
Tuberculosis was called Consumption in the 19th century.

Rest rooms? Toilets. Jakes. Outhouse. Washrooms. Lavatory.
Ladies' rooms often have a couch.
In the a European countries I’ve been to, most of the public restrooms are labeled WC for the English term Water Closet. Though strangely enough, I’ve seen many restrooms in England and Ireland (English speaking countries) simply labeled Toilets. Go figure!
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,250
Tucson
How many of you can still drive a manual shift transmission?
The theater I worked at got a manual shift van, and there were only two of us that could drive it.

I can and prefer it just more fun!
a
I was Mr. Four-Speed, until I became Mr. Five-Speed. I loved manuals and drove well over a million miles rowing through gears and double-clutching my downshifts. Then, at one point, I got tired of it and bought an auto. Even my Miata was an auto, and I loved it. (The Miata automatic was perfectly matched to the power curve of the engine.)

As I look at it now, I think it’s a combination of factors. Automatics have improved drastically since I was a kid. They are reliable and durable, these days. Overdrives and locking torque converters have helped and the “slush-box” effect is a thing of the past.

At one point, I had a short career of driving Class 8 trucks. Within a few weeks, I had adapted to float-shifting and frequently drove runs of several hundred miles touching the clutch only when pulling away from a dead stop. I have to say that running through a 13 speed at 80,000 pounds without touching the clutch was an enjoyable challenge. I think that an unsynchronized gearbox in a sports car would be a lot of fun.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
16,627
lafayette in
Recently, an attempted car theft in Australia was foiled when 2 young thieves broke into a car in a supermarket carpark. When they gained entry they realized it was a manual gearshift and neither of them could work out how to drive it. The cops who turned up and arrested them were highly amused. :D
Happens here with carjackings all of the time. Great theft protection.

Yeah, Xerox became so common-place that making a paper copy on a copier was always refered to as 'make a xerox' even though it was some other brand. That 'xerox' reference didn't last that long, maybe only 14 years or so. No one says it now. Just like the Brits say 'Hoover' for vaccuum. Could also say 'that was photoshopped' even though Photoshop wasn't the actual program used to alter the image.
Brits call loudspeakers "Tannoys" for the most common ones they have. Tannoy is as common as Jensen here.

Well to be fair, if your apartment was at an angle that would make for an uncomfortable living situation.
Flats mean all on one level.

In the European countries I’ve been to, most of the public restrooms are labeled WC for the English term Water Closet. Though strangely enough, I’ve seen many restrooms in England and Ireland (English speaking countries) simply labeled Toilets. Go figure!
My Mom's initials are WC.

a
I was Mr. Four-Speed, until I became Mr. Five-Speed. I loved manuals and drove well over a million miles rowing through gears and double-clutching my downshifts. Then, at one point, I got tired of it and bought an auto. Even my Miata was an auto, and I loved it. (The Miata automatic was perfectly matched to the power curve of the engine.)

As I look at it now, I think it’s a combination of factors. Automatics have improved drastically since I was a kid. They are reliable and durable, these days. Overdrives and locking torque converters have helped and the “slush-box” effect is a thing of the past.
.
I learned to drive on a three on the tree---column shift. Even came across a four on the tree in an old DKW. Four speed trucks originally had a "granny" gear, or creeper, useful for farms or other heavy work. I have an automatic now in my Jeep (first 4 wheelers ever to have auto trans). It's a whole lot kinder to my arthritic knees.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,250
Tucson
I learned to drive on a three on the tree---column shift. Even came across a four on the tree in an old DKW. Four speed trucks originally had a "granny" gear, or creeper, useful for farms or other heavy work. I have an automatic now in my Jeep (first 4 wheelers ever to have auto trans). It's a whole lot kinder to my arthritic knees.
For off-roading, an auto is very useful. I watch a YouTube channel called Matt’s Off Road Recovery, about a fellow near St. George Utah, that has a towing business which includes recovering vehicles that are off road and in some very precarious situations. He has a Jeep Cherokee and a purpose built recovery 4x4 in a 1961 Corvair Station Wagon body. Both have automatics, and both do some impressive rock crawling.

It’s been a while since I had a 4x4 of any kind. My last one was an early Bronco. If circumstances allow, I’d like to find a clean Jeep TJ for a runabout. I need something that can handle a 75 MPH Interstate, but is flexible enough for mild off-roading and can handle snow if I visit up north.
 

wabash slim

I Bleed Orange
Feb 10, 2010
16,627
lafayette in
For off-roading, an auto is very useful. I watch a YouTube channel called Matt’s Off Road Recovery, about a fellow near St. George Utah, that has a towing business which includes recovering vehicles that are off road and in some very precarious situations. He has a Jeep Cherokee and a purpose built recovery 4x4 in a 1961 Corvair Station Wagon body. Both have automatics, and both do some impressive rock crawling.

It’s been a while since I had a 4x4 of any kind. My last one was an early Bronco. If circumstances allow, I’d like to find a clean Jeep TJ for a runabout. I need something that can handle a 75 MPH Interstate, but is flexible enough for mild off-roading and can handle snow if I visit up north.
I got 4X4s due to snow. I grew up in lake effect snow country, and have had a few different 4X4s over the years. I'm NOT gonna be stuck coz of the snow. If it's up to the bumpers, stay home. If we're going onto the interstate, the Jeep is OK, but we'll likely take the Chevy instead.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
8,946
South Dakota
I've got one folded up and stored in my shed . Never seen a roof top , mint condition .
My dad didn’t want one on the roof so although we could have gotten clear signal for about five channels as we could really see with out massive fuzz and snow were two. Ours was in the garage attic no way to mount it so it would tirn. He didn’t install any improvement until I went into the USMC in ‘84. Then he got directv. Still wasn’t much to watch.
 


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