NPD: Surfy Industries Blossom Point Pedal

TV the Wired Turtle

Gretschified
Double Platinum Member
Jul 25, 2009
14,810
Sandy Eggo
Damn. And I thought I was nerdy. That’s some spectrumy **** right there — not that there’s anything wrong with that. 😲

you always go full geek on circuitry when youre a pedal builder :) :)

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ruger9

Country Gent
Nov 1, 2008
3,669
NJ
My SurfyVibe arrived. I like it. Alot. It's simple and it sounds great. And Orange is my favorite color. :)

One of the very few times in my life I have bought a pedal, and not immediately started thinking "yeah it sounds really good... but is there one that sounds better?" I don't care. I'm SO DONE with rabbit holes. They are exhausting!
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
27,023
Tucson
It drips. I am stoked. 🤙
Just make sure to mop-up the floor as soon as you are done playing. :)
My SurfyVibe arrived. I like it. Alot. It's simple and it sounds great. And Orange is my favorite color. :)

One of the very few times in my life I have bought a pedal, and not immediately started thinking "yeah it sounds really good... but is there one that sounds better?" I don't care. I'm SO DONE with rabbit holes. They are exhausting!
That’s a high compliment.
 

David MacNeill

Gretschie
Gold Supporting Member
Nov 13, 2022
100
Boise ID
Update on my amplification rig. The twin tens weren’t making me smile so I had Murray Amps build me a matching cab for my Murray DTM-18 head. The cab uses a British-made Celestion Heritage G12M-65. I used a plexiglass riser for my Surfy Bear reverb — since this is my studio configuration, all the pedals are off the floor. The tone is an unmitigated delight.

E5E93600-A1D4-46E1-9275-44C70FC3AB4F.jpeg
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
27,023
Tucson
Update on my amplification rig. The twin tens weren’t making me smile so I had Murray Amps build me a matching cab for my Murray DTM-18 head. The cab uses a British-made Celestion Heritage G12M-65. I used a plexiglass riser for my Surfy Bear reverb — since this is my studio configuration, all the pedals are off the floor. The tone is an unmitigated delight.

View attachment 197000
I like that. The plexi stand for the Surfy Bear is a nice touch. I’ve always found 12” speakers more to my liking than 10s. I don’t know why, but 12s just seem to do it for me. I bet that’s a great sounding rig.
 

Shadowy_Man

Synchromatic
May 18, 2020
673
Chicago
It occurs to me that the Quilter amps also have a built-in limiter to help simulate more of a tube amp sound. Maybe the same principle as this? My modeler has something similar - it has a tube control knob that basically just seems to be a limiter.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
27,023
Tucson
It occurs to me that the Quilter amps also have a built-in limiter to help simulate more of a tube amp sound. Maybe the same principle as this? My modeler has something similar - it has a tube control knob that basically just seems to be a limiter.
You make a good point.

By placing a limiter just before the amp, the effect is bound to be different from having one near the beginning of the signal path. It becomes more like a studio effect. The Quilter amps have earned a good reputation. For the Surf guys to accept them, there has to be some good sounds coming out of the speakers. :

The more I use the Blossom point, the more I like it.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
27,023
Tucson
Because of this tread I bought the Blossom point.
I really like it. It feels good to play trough.
So thank you @Synchro .
Glad to hear it. I think that these are exceptional pieces of gear. It brought me something I have been looking for, for a long time; the clean, but edgy sound of an amp, just before breakup. Mine is on, pretty much all that time.
 

ruger9

Country Gent
Nov 1, 2008
3,669
NJ
Glad to hear it. I think that these are exceptional pieces of gear. It brought me something I have been looking for, for a long time; the clean, but edgy sound of an amp, just before breakup. Mine is on, pretty much all that time.

This description (and many others) sound alot like a pedal I just tried yesterday, the Strymon Deco. It has one side that is "saturation" only, and I see why people love it so much... they actually leave it on all the time... it really does act like you are slowly turning your amp, slowly adding a little bit of compression (less than a regular OD), and slowly adds this beautiful grit, all without changing your amp's tone... it really does sound/feel like you are slowly turning your amp up.

I actually love it, but I'm returning it, because I have no use for the "doubler" side of the pedal, and I can't keep a $350 pedal for just the saturation side, as nice as it is. FWIW, I can get a Timmy to sound very similar to the saturation side of the Deco.
 

bobeschism

Synchromatic
Mar 4, 2022
624
Bristol, UK
Most commercial recordings have compression, either on a per-track basis, or for the entire mixdown. So, in many cases, compression is compressing everything that was laid down; the instrument, any effects, the microphones, everything.
FWIW, it sounds like studio compression. What’s the difference between studio compression and stomp-box compression? Studio compression is applied by an experienced recording engineer and it’s not overdone. :)

Good point. A recording engineer can often add 4+ different levels of compression: while tracking on the way in (sometimes two separate compressors, one to tame the inital transients and another as a "glue" to even out the recorded signal); additional compression during mixdown: to the individual tracks, to the group busses, to the mix bus, and again more compression and limiting during mastering. Plus if it's being recorded to tape (admittedly not very often these days) there'll be the natural compression from tape saturation.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
27,023
Tucson
This description (and many others) sound alot like a pedal I just tried yesterday, the Strymon Deco. It has one side that is "saturation" only, and I see why people love it so much... they actually leave it on all the time... it really does act like you are slowly turning your amp, slowly adding a little bit of compression (less than a regular OD), and slowly adds this beautiful grit, all without changing your amp's tone... it really does sound/feel like you are slowly turning your amp up.

I actually love it, but I'm returning it, because I have no use for the "doubler" side of the pedal, and I can't keep a $350 pedal for just the saturation side, as nice as it is. FWIW, I can get a Timmy to sound very similar to the saturation side of the Deco.
It looks like a great pedal, but I agree, I would never use anything besides to tape saturation, and that’s a lot of bread for just one function.

The sound of tape being pushed can be very effective. I remember just making cassettes, and always setting the level to just where it began to saturate, and those tapes sounded great. I’m sure that it can be duplicated. A few weeks back, I did some experimentation on the preamp of an MXR Sugar Drive. With the drive at zero, I could get some pleasing sounds, just pushing the preamp slightly.
Good point. A recording engineer can often add 4+ different levels of compression: while tracking on the way in (sometimes two separate compressors, one to tame the inital transients and another as a "glue" to even out the recorded signal); additional compression during mixdown: to the individual tracks, to the group busses, to the mix bus, and again more compression and limiting during mastering. Plus if it's being recorded to tape (admittedly not very often these days) there'll be the natural compression from tape saturation.
Compressors in studios fascinate me. There are some great analog compressors out there, and they can really make a difference, when used by someone with the appropriate skills.
 


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