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New tricks for an old dog.

Discussion in 'New Member Intros' started by Czar, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. blc45

    blc45 Country Gent

    Age:
    65
    Aug 23, 2011
    nc
    It makes no difference if you start at 12 years old or 65 years. It the same journey along the same road for everyone. People who started early in life may be further down the road than you but they took the same steps you will take.

    You will enjoy the trip just as much!
     
  2. loudnlousy

    loudnlousy Country Gent

    Age:
    51
    Oct 18, 2015
    Hildesheim, Germany
    Welcome here. Congrats to your new hobby.
     
  3. benjwri

    benjwri Country Gent

    Age:
    79
    Oct 27, 2011
    Central ON Can
    Welcome to GT. You'll struggle with the F chord...perservere...takes time but it will come...downhill from there...
     
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  5. MTurner

    MTurner Friend of Fred

    Age:
    60
    Aug 17, 2010
    Clayton, North Carolina, USA
    Not forgetting B. Grrr...
     
  6. KuKuKu

    KuKuKu Gretschie

    237
    Aug 28, 2016
    Germany
    It took me 25 years and an electric guitar to figure that one out. ;)
     
  7. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Gretschie

    Age:
    59
    221
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    Funny, I have the F Chord down. Kind of found it easy,... BUT EVERY other chord! :(
     
  8. englishman

    englishman Friend of Fred

    Age:
    59
    Apr 5, 2014
    Detroit
    Always sounds weird to me because if you can play F then it's just a matter of sliding it up the fretboard to GET every other chord.

    C is toughest for me because of the arthritis in my index finger.
     
  9. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Gretschie

    Age:
    59
    221
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    I suck at the G chords and bar chords plus my transitions are really bad. But when playing a surf rhythm or the Stray Cat Strut the "F" does transition well to the other positions. A minor to C is pretty tricky too and I find it is used a lot!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
  10. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Gretschie

    Age:
    59
    221
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    Have you tried Glucosomine or Baxyl? I take Baxyl and it keeps my knees from creaking and It helps my joints in general. My Boss has taken Glucosomine for arthritis in his hip and he swears by it.
     
  11. MarkyMac

    MarkyMac Electromatic

    Welcome CZ... and what a great story! Here's a tip. Make sure you get an Amp that has a 'speaker cancelling' headphone jack (most of the small practice Amps do)

    This way, with a nice set of headphones, you can 'noodle' away in your own little world for hours until you get the hang of it....and not annoy those around you. (WARNING: You will occasionally still annoy them however, when you persistantly fail to hear the 'Dinner's ready' / 'How about mowing the lawns' calls. But in yr own little world nothing really matters.

    Enjoy the journey and best of luck. And remember... you've got absolutely nothing to lose.
     
    benjwri likes this.
  12. Czar

    Czar Electromatic

    17
    Jan 6, 2017
    UK
    I would like to take this opportunity to thank each and everyone of you who has welcomed me to the forum and offered advice, very much appreciated.

    Having decided on the guitar model, 5420t my attention has turned to amplification, now I have to admit, I do enjoy a full rich clear crisp sound with bass punch when I listen to music, my home audio speakers are Ken Kreisel.

    Having done some research I've decided to go for a Fender tube amp, what I'm torn between is, a combination of amp and speaker in one unit (hot rod Blues, Delux, Deville etc) or a separate head amp and speaker cabinet, I've no need to worry about annoying the neighbours, as I don't have any, nor do I need to be concerned about missing the Dinner call or the request to mow the lawn, as I am responsible for both, living the single dream life.

    Once again, any advice would be very much appreciated.
     
    MarkyMac likes this.
  13. Perry Bryant

    Perry Bryant Synchromatic

    627
    Jan 12, 2012
    Sharpsburg, GA
    Welcome to the forum. I have been playing for a LONG time. I own an Electromatic. It suits my needs. Oh, I'm still learning. I think the learning curve never ends. But it is pleasurable. Enjoy yourself.
     
  14. Tony65x55

    Tony65x55 Friend of Fred

    Age:
    61
    Sep 23, 2011
    The 'Shwa, Ontario, Canada
    Welcome to Gretsch Talk Czar. Like my friend Perry, I have a few guitars and amps and my stable includes twp 5420T guitars. I play them and gig them and can attest they are capble of doing anything you are.

    If a Fender amp is in the cards, I would recommend the 68 Custom Princeton Reverb. It has a very high quality sound and while not inexpensive, it represents good value. Although as a beginner, the very inexpensive Mustang I would suffice, it cannot bring out the Gretschy Goodness your 5420 is capable of. As you love high quality sound, this is a fine option.

    I hope this is helpful to you
     
    doctorSlo likes this.
  15. drrohle

    drrohle Synchromatic

    579
    Jan 3, 2014
    Hays, KS
    Welcome Czar!

    I started playing when I was 61. Now, like the Beatles song.. I'm 64! My first electric was a Gretsch, when I bought it I had to ask my guitar teacher "Is a Gretsch ok for a newbie to buy and learn" He said "good as any". Well he was wrong, in my opinion, Gretsch is better than any other. So glad I bought it and I never regretted it one bit. Nor have I ever regretted learning how to play guitar. One the most enjoyable things I've done in life!


    Again, welcome!
     
    MarkyMac and benjwri like this.
  16. benjwri

    benjwri Country Gent

    Age:
    79
    Oct 27, 2011
    Central ON Can
    Guitars/amps...it's your choice. fwiw I have two Rolands, a cube 60 and a cube 15. The 15 is great around the house. It has the speaker cancelling headphone jack plus an accessory input for a cd, laptop whatever. Not a tube job but also not all that expensive.
    Good luck!
     
  17. hoqcougfan

    hoqcougfan Gretschie

    280
    Feb 25, 2013
    washington
    One day you suck less, I can only hope.
     
  18. LivingMyDream

    LivingMyDream Country Gent

    I completely agree with the consensus of my fellow forumites, and these two posts really sum it up for me. I started much later in life, as well, and I didn't become an instant success by any means. It took a lot of frustration over a period of 6 months before it finally clicked into place for me. I nearly quit, but gave it one more day, and it turned out to be just enough. I'm not yet where I want to be, but then every time I conquer another skill, it makes me want to go farther . . . just like golf. I have played a number of different guitars now, and I also have a Gretsch 5420, which has been a lot of fun to play.

    My feeling is that you should find a Gretsch to hold in your hands. Everyone's hands are different, and you should make sure that guitar you choose feels right in your hands - the neck should be shaped to allow your fingers to move easily, while your hand remains relaxed. When you begin playing, you may find that there is one type of guitar neck that appeals to you. Later on, you could find that you taste changes as your skills improve. Just remember that picking a beautiful guitar is good, but you also need to make sure that it fits you and allows you to learn.

    Just my own 2 cents worth.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
  19. Czar

    Czar Electromatic

    17
    Jan 6, 2017
    UK
    Thank you to everyone, the warm welcome and friendly advice, is very much appreciated.

    Today I visited my local guitar store to hopefully follow up from the advice offered from you guys, to hold my very first guitar to see which one I would find most comfortable, hmmm this is where I struggled, maybe it's my age (49) 50 this year, the frequency I ride my motorbike with fixed hand positions for long periods of time, or my joints just haven't or don't want to be forced into the, to me, unnatural positions required to play the guitar.

    No matter which style of guitar I was asked to hold, Gretsch mainly, I honestly couldn't feel any difference, apart from weight, between being able to slide my hand back and forth along the neck, nor did one neck feel different to any other, in my hands.

    When shown how to hold the guitar with placement of my hands, I was then asked to place my index finger on the second from bottom, thin string, my next finger on the fourth string up from the bottom, and my next finger on another string, can't remember which one, then asked to hold them in place, and pick each string, sadly my numb fingers were obviously pressing on all the strings, and as I plucked each string, there was no note at all, just a dead sound.

    We tried this over and over, not a guitar lesson, just friendly shop staff, and no matter how much I tried, my numb fingers would not allow the note, it seems I need to press the string/s with the very tips of my fingers, and not the pads of my fingers, how on earth do you distort your fingers so only the very tip touches the string, and not the whole pad of your finger, which in my case pressed more than one string at a time ? LOL.

    Is there any tricks/tips or exercises to work my rather numb fingers into some kind of suppleness, good luck trying to explain that, to a complete novice.
     
  20. Floo

    Floo Synchromatic

    881
    Dec 16, 2012
    Elmshorn, Germany
    In my experience, drinking a lot of water through the day helps a lot - I usually have 1 1/2 - 2 liters a day. When I don't, my fingers don't move the way they are supposed to and feel rather clumsy.
    As an absolute beginner, you simply have to try over and over again very, patiently. Try for half an hour or so, leave it for a few hours, try again, never stop, because when it's working for the first time it will be wonderful!
     
  21. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Gretschie

    Age:
    59
    221
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    My Guitar teacher put it in perspective. Guitar is the only instrument that you play unnaturally. Think of a sax or piano. Your fingers are moving naturally. Now with the guitar, you have to use your fingers almost backwards?! You will get better. Your hands can ACTUALLY STRETCH! I did not believe it, but I can do things now I would never have dreamed of. It has been about 3 years and I play almost everyday. The key (IMHO) to not getting frustrated is to find simple songs you can play without a ton of dexterous movement. Then you can work on the more difficult movements with the satisfaction of knowing you are able to play some simple melodies. The Mel Bey Book One is a great learning tool as is "Guitar for Dummies".
     
    MarkyMac likes this.