Kurt’s Martin just broke all the records

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by mbkri, Jun 21, 2020.

  1. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    Fair point, but it's a matter of perspective. If I'm a young pacifist that WW2 flag won't symbolise anything worthwhile to me. The flag Janet was waving when she had the wardrobe malfunction on the other hand...
     
  2. BohemianLikeMe

    BohemianLikeMe Gretschie

    298
    Apr 18, 2020
    Prague, CZ
    I mean, that itself is pretty much what historical value is, though? It's not like an original Van Gogh is functionally any different than a print, outside from the fact that it was done by the man himself.

    Back to the album for a second-- acoustics amped up can sound really cool. Lightning Hopkins is a great example of that. It's just that Cobain's guitar tech ran the Martin out into one of those awful Fender 135 watt Twin Reverbs, and the production tastes of the mid-90s were all about super dry, scooped acoustic guitar sounds. That guitar would have sounded way better mic'd or run into a smaller amp that could get a little more wound up.
     
  3. Highroller

    Highroller Synchromatic

    765
    Jun 11, 2015
    Portland, OR
    Apparently, that guitar’s been the subject of a bitter legal battle between Cobain’s daughter Frances Bean and her now ex-husband Isaiah Silva, who claimed that Frances gave him the guitar as a wedding present in 2014. When they split up, Cobain wanted it back, Silva said “no way”. Lawsuits filed, threats made, craziness followed, etc, etc …

    It wound up in Silva’s possession as part of the 2018 divorce settlement, so I guess it’s safe to assume the courts agreed with him, but I don’t think the whole thing is done yet. Seems odd to me they could auction it off while litigation was still pending, but who knows … If Silva’s getting the payday, I guess he’d be one happy camper this morning!

    Just imagine that, set for life from the sale of one guitar!
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2020
  4. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    I agree with you about 80s metal. Most of the big hair bands got on my nerves. But at least they could play guitars well and many of them were good singers. It became amateur hour when the grunge bands arrived. Rock and roll has never recovered since then. You may not believe or agree with it but look where rock music is today.
     
  5. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    It might have been what some older folks were saying at the time but many of them (like my parents) wound up liking a lot of the music. That never happened with the grunge music. It couldn't because it didn't have mass appeal. It was dreary sounding and negative and to many offensive. There's no doubt grunge had a huge effect on lots of young kids back in the 90s but it never crossed over to the masses. Artists of all generations and music styles did versions and continue to do versions of Beatles songs. I don't see that happening with Smells Like Teen Spirit...:).
     
  6. JT19

    JT19 Gretschie

    231
    Nov 28, 2009
    Atlanta, GA
    Exhibit #1.

    As I have said, I'm not a Nirvana fan, but I'm a huge fan of Noah Gundersen, and I LOVE his cover. It made me appreciate this song. Stripped down like this, it's still very powerful.

     
  7. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    I guess it's the doom and gloom that I don't like. It even comes through in Noah's version. Noah's a good singer but that song doesn't get it for me. Oh well different strokes as they say.
     
  8. JT19

    JT19 Gretschie

    231
    Nov 28, 2009
    Atlanta, GA
    A quick search on YouTube shows plenty of diverse cover versions, most of which are VERY good:

    Tori Amos:
    The Gallows:
    Sofia Karlberg:
    Imagine Dragons:
    Miley Cyrus:
    Patti Smith: https://youtu.be/M_ciiCyxOJA
    Pink: https://youtu.be/I4-qRT0uhOY

    It goes on and on... but I think I've made my point. You (or I) don't have to LIKE Nirvana, or Kurt Cobain, or this song... but to claim that it's not influential seems incorrect.

    Different people are influenced by different music, and that's a GOOD thing. I don't know why people keep insisting that musical styles other than their own personal preferences are inferior.
     
  9. JT19

    JT19 Gretschie

    231
    Nov 28, 2009
    Atlanta, GA
    Fair enough. I'm not trying to convince you to like the song. Only that it was indeed influential to a lot of people.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2020
  10. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    I guess I don't relate to the anger coming from people like Kurt Cobain, Miley Cyrus, Patti Smith. I like to be happy and the whole grunge thing for me was depressing and a bummer. I got nothing out of the music except the desire to turn it off when it came on. I was gigging before and after that music became popular and I think it helped destroy the rock club scene. So yeah I've got a negative feeling towards that whole Seattle bum out music. Most rock music pumped me up and made me want to party and rock out. Grunge made me want to put my guitar away and go home. It had the same effect on lots of people. Girls couldn't dance to it. All they could do was slam dance. It just set a different atmosphere and vibe that was negative. Protest music of the 60s had the same effect on me. So like I said different strokes for different folks.
     
  11. BohemianLikeMe

    BohemianLikeMe Gretschie

    298
    Apr 18, 2020
    Prague, CZ
    Man, I never felt better than the day when I gave away all the Beatles records an ex left at my house post breakup, so... :p
     
  12. Scott

    Scott Country Gent

    Age:
    56
    Jun 27, 2008
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Also read that a smashed Boss DS-1 of his sold for 9 grand. smh
     
  13. Tadhg

    Tadhg Gretschie

    250
    Aug 8, 2019
    Qld - Australia
    You could argue the same happened in the 70's with The Sex Pistols and Ramones. I hear more complexity in Nirvana than their works.

    You could also argue that the vapid nature of much of what the 80's produced was the beginning of the end (it's not like there's huge amounts of counterpoint in their work, and being able to shred doesn't mean you've got taste).

    You could argue that the end of rock and roll came in the 60's with bands like Sabbath, Judas Priest and the invention of metal. Metal doesn't rely on great singing.

    There's always an opportunity to throw stones. But is there value in it..?

    You may be right in the historical value of the moment. I was under the misapprehension that their appearance was fairly early in the day, and helped lead to Clapton's appearance, rather than the other way around.

    A major problem for Nirvana and the other 'Grunge' artists is that they were bunched together as a collective. Nirvana didn't last, because Kurt didn't last. But Dave went on with The Foo Fighters - one of the few rock bands still out there making notable money. Looking at Nirvana and the Foo Fighters, it's almost like looking at The Beatles' first couple of records, then Wings. Sadly, we never saw Nirvana's Rubber Soul or Sergeant Pepper.

    But the 'Grunge' era was as diverse as the British Invasion. I'm not a huge Stones fan, and I don't remotely like Pearl Jam. I'm not a huge Nirvana fan, though I can hear the skill, artistry and passion in their music (Dave's drumming is incredible). To classify either musical era as an homogenous body of work and disregard it based off a single sample is to miss out on the potential for much growth. Imagine if When I'm 64 was the song kids heard today to use to judge the British Invasion. They'd never last long enough to hear the greatness of A Day in the Life, In My Life, Helter Skelter, Come Together, All You Need Is Love, Can't Buy Me Love, Eleanor Rigby, Day Tripper, I Wanna Hold Your Hand... Without considering Satisfaction, My Generation, etc. Even the worst forms of music have something you can borrow or steal to improve your own playing.


    Of course, the greatest of the Grunge artists was......
    Sadgasm.
     
  14. S.R.Cash

    S.R.Cash Gretschie

    286
    Aug 29, 2019
    Ontario, Canada
    Sometimes good is just good. I've obviously ended up in a WAY different world musically than where I started, but when 4 Non Blondes came out, that made me take my guitar seriously. Eventually that led to the first of many '3 guys in a garage' thing, and then one night we all sat and watched the Unplugged episode with Nirvana. After that, riffs became thought out, chord progressions were paid there well overdue attention, and lyrics were edited and crafted carefully. For what it was at the time, and me being of the right High School age, well here I am still (Un)plugging away!
     
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  15. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    The speculators and brokers have discovered the instrument market.

    See this pic?
    [​IMG]

    Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvatore Mundi".
    It is magnificent, and sold for a measly $450.3 million USD... yes, Holy mother of toilet rolls!
     
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  16. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    Just for the record I hated the Sex Pistols too. The Ramones were like a comedy act to me. They could barely sing or play but they were fun.
     
    Tadhg likes this.
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