Instrumental Guitarists With Something to Say

gretschbigsby

Gretschie
Nov 21, 2009
202
chicago
Definitely too old to fully appreciate that list!

Nokie Edwards
Hank Marvin
Don Rich
James Burton
Redd Volkaert

And then there are the jazz players, especially chord melody and bossa nova guys. I wish I was good enough to say that they influence my playing.
 

AZBrahma

Synchromatic
Dec 18, 2020
518
Arizona
I'm the freak that has heard of most of the guitarists on that list. Of all listed, I think my favorite is:

Nick Johnston

Holy smokes, that guy is on another plane.

Glad to see Guthrie Govan make the list as well.
 

ruger9

Country Gent
Nov 1, 2008
3,483
NJ
yeah.. there's many. Here's my list:

GregV (only one album, "Tailgate Troubador", but it's a masterpiece. Desert island album. My #1 for a LOOONG time now.

Andy Timmons
Duke Levine
Jim Campilongo
Steve Vai
Mateus Asato
Guthrie Trapp
El Twanguero
Tommy Emmanuel
Johnny A.

I wanted to post a GregV tune here, but none of his album is on YouTube. So you'll have to settle for Guthrie Trapp & El Twanguero:



 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,540
Petaluma
I think I know who you mean but I can't come up with the name either.

Roy did a lot of silly stuff, true. But, just watch his face when he plays. He's giving it his most, his best, playing at the top of his ability. I'll have to add in Glen Campbell, who was every bit Roy's equal.

EDIT: The tapping jazz guitarist I'm thinking of is Stanley Jordan.
Yep that's him! Saw him a couple times. Seemed like a really nice guy.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,530
Tucson
Definitely too old to fully appreciate that list!

Nokie Edwards
Hank Marvin
Don Rich
James Burton
Redd Volkaert

And then there are the jazz players, especially chord melody and bossa nova guys. I wish I was good enough to say that they influence my playing.
Me too. I like your list, a lot better. Eric Johnson is an excellent player, but he’s about as modern as my tastes get.

I‘ve been paying a lot more attention to James Burton, lately. He has brought a lot of great ideas to the table. He strikes me as being very serious about his music, and applied his creative genius to the emerging world of Rock n’ Roll. I’ve long felt that Rick Nelson has been somewhat under-appreciated, and Burton was a big part of Nelson’s early career.

The Ventures, all of them, impress me greatly. They were a parallel of the Shadows, and every bit as groundbreaking. They also, IMHO, developed a tasteful sound that sounded modern (at the time) which was copied for years.

The Shadows: MAN! They are the definition of groundbreaking. They developed an instrumental guitar sound using the gear readily available in Great Britain, Vox amps and a variety of echo devices, many of which came from Italy. What amazes me, is that in an era when reverb was pretty much the province of recording engineers, Hank Marvin was using various delay devices, not only for slapback, but also as an expander, much like the reverb used by The Ventures. That was really innovative, that a band could duplicate their studio sound, before portable reverb tanks were available.

Don Rich certainly set the standard for the sound used by many Country guitarists, to this day. A Tele and a Fender Twin with reverb we’re mainstays, although I believe that he departed from this, at times, over the years.

Volkaert is astounding. He definitely has stood upon the shoulders of the giant that came before, and has advanced the art.
 


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