Incredibly Large' Mountain Lion Prowls Around Petaluma California Property

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by ZackyDog, Jul 2, 2021.

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  1. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I’ve seen that with the coyotes around here. They try to lure domestic dogs out of their yard, then the pack ambushes the dog.
     
  2. Tony65x55

    Tony65x55 Gretschified

    Age:
    65
    Sep 23, 2011
    The 'Shwa, Ontario, Canada
    They've moved beyond "isn't that cute" to return as an alpha predator. In my town, just last week, a six-year old girl attacked:

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/oshawa-coyote-attack-1.6088293

    And the week before in Calgary:

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-coyote-attacks-1.6073999

    Last night my missus spotted a huge 'yote on the trail where we walk our dog. Ain't that special.

    My son lives in beautiful Elliot Lake, Ontario, where they are overrun with black bears. All cute and fuzzy. Two years ago when we were visiting the grandbabies and my wife confronted a black bear IN THE HOUSE! Her screaming startled it and my son got very aggressive with it and it left the house. Twice he has been bluff charged by big bears.

    Last year, Ontario had 1,900 human/bear encounters.
     
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  3. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    They are considered varmints in these parts and it’s legal to kill them. I suspect that there will have to be some formal actions to control their population undertaken soon.

    When I was 10 years old, I saw a coyote for the first time, on a road trip out west. That was thrilling, because it was novel. Nowadays, they are neither novel or thrilling.
     
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  4. BrianW

    BrianW Country Gent

    Oct 21, 2014
    Vancouver Island
    I saw the same tactic used by wolves around Yellowknife back in the early 80's. Send a female in to attract a dog then ambush and eat it. The town actually had people hired to kill wolves around the outskirts.... sled dogs as well as individual pets were disappearing too often. Not an effective solution; the wolves were too smart. Almost surprisingly, I can't recall any incidents of people being attacked.
     
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  5. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    71
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Still better than the venomous spitting cobra that got loose, 21 year old kid is a snake fancier with 60 or so danger noodles. Why would anyone want to keep something so dangerous s a spitting cobra as a pet? At least he didn't try to claim it was an emotional support animal.
     
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  6. ZackyDog

    ZackyDog Friend of Fred

    Age:
    56
    Feb 6, 2015
    In the USA
    I don't know if they're spitting but, this snake charmer manages four cobras(!)

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. DennisC

    DennisC Country Gent

    Age:
    38
    May 11, 2017
    Germany
    Yet, I never heard of a sufficient reason to hunt anything to actual extinction, but regrets about it every time it was done.
     
  8. Bertotti

    Bertotti Friend of Fred

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    They are all over out here. The kill pets livestock and cause considerable problems with ranchers farmers and people who have outdoor pets.

    I have big holes popping up all over my yard. Darn badgers, tue scent a gopher or chipmunk/ground squirrel and will dig almost as fast as any machine until the get it kill it and eat it. Very dangerous critter.

    now besides coyote and mountain lions we now have wolves coming back in. Last I heard they had a litter. People forget how dangerous some of the animals are and we are at the top end of that list somewhere.
     
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  9. juks

    juks Synchromatic

    716
    Nov 26, 2020
    Fremont, California
    When I lived in Mountain View we had a mountain lion incident. Where I lived was good 5 miles from HW280. On the otherside of the highway you have hills that are more of a wilderness. On my side, it's all populated.

    Coming home from work there was half the MV police force in the intersection in front of the building I lived in. And police helicopter hovering above.

    Turns out a mountain lion had made its way to the building across and was hiding under a parked car. They used a tranquilizer gun and then transported the sleeping kitty way off of the Bay Area. Amazing that it had made its way so far into densely populated area.
     
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  10. ZackyDog

    ZackyDog Friend of Fred

    Age:
    56
    Feb 6, 2015
    In the USA
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  11. TV the Wired Turtle

    TV the Wired Turtle Gretschified

    Jul 25, 2009
    Sandy Eggo
    beware of Cougar Barbie

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. DennisC

    DennisC Country Gent

    Age:
    38
    May 11, 2017
    Germany
    And tranquilizing them is far, far better than killing!

    I'm often really shocked about how far above the rest of the fauna some people get themselves into believing to be ... totally beyond. We're animals ourselves. We're nowhere near as special as we sometimes seem to enjoy to believe.

    At least, some get that it isn't right to kill any other animal who causes some discomfort just because ... OTOH, you sometimes meet people who proudly tell you that they never have removed a spider by glass and paper or so, but killed all of them who dared into their house. What an achievement. I am impressed.

    Anyway, it's nice to read that some people aren't ignorant about killing a nonhuman animal just because.
     
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  13. juks

    juks Synchromatic

    716
    Nov 26, 2020
    Fremont, California
    Yes, I thought it was pretty cool how they handled it. Kitty's life was spared.
     
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  14. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    People don't realize that these things are dangerous to humans. I'm all for compassion, but if you started relocating Coyotes, it would require a massive effort and would have no effect whatsoever, because they would make a beeline for populated areas. My worst animal encounter was with a prairie rattler that deliberately came into a yard where there were people and dogs. We watched him in disbelief, but when he saw the dogs, which were in a pen, he made a beeline for their pen. I, and the other person present, who happened to be the homeowner, acted to protect the dogs, and ended up with the snake trying to kill us. The homeowner did as they saw fit, in this case, and I'll leave it at that. That night, I had a nightmare where I relived the experience and rolled out of bed, onto the floor.

    My second worst animal encounter was with a coyote, with which I ended up in a standoff. It was in the middle of a road and he became aggressive. I was just trying to pass and go on my way, which I was able to accomplish, but I felt that I was at risk of being attacked inn the process by what comes down to being a fairly large, very wild, dog. Both of these event happened in populated areas which had been established for a matter of years. It's very easy to talk about what should be done regarding animals from the comfort of an armchair, but when you are trying to fight off an aggressive, venomous snake, your priority is to keep from being harmed. Even with modern medicine and anti-venoms, it's quite possible to die from a snakebite, or lose a limb. Even the most fortunate usually end up scarred and with tissue loss, and no, the lost doesn't regenerate.

    No one loves felines more than I do, and I have an especially great fondness for Mountain Lions, but they are still very dangerous. 15 - 20 years ago, a mountain lion was spotted eyeing the playground of a school, up in Tucson. They captured and relocated him, but he found his way back to that same school and the wildlife officials felt that they had but one choice. I hated to hear about it, but what were they to do? As much as I hate to think of an animal being killed, I would not want to think of an animal killing or maiming a child, and that is almost certainly what would have happened. Had they not dealt with it as they had, there is a very real possibility that some person now in their 20s would either be dead, or living a life hindered by a serious injury and the emotional trauma that goes along with such a thing.

    Another misconception is that wild animals are easily scared away by humans. That is not always the case. My coyote encounter taught me that, but there are abundant accounts of coyotes coming into yards and killing pets. It happened to a friend, and there was another recent case where a coyote came into a yard and seized a Yorkshire Terrier while its owners were present and trying to prevent this from happening. Wild animals can be vicious and a truly wild animal doesn't care about the concerns of any human or domestic animal. Fortunately, deadly encounters are relatively rare, but there are any numbers of encounters which are close calls. When I got into it with that snake, the last thing I was looking for was an animal encounter, but in a matter of seconds, I was at serious risk from an animal that had the ability to kill me. 37 years later, my blood still runs cold if I dwell on it.
     
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  15. AZBrahma

    AZBrahma Gretschie

    285
    Dec 18, 2020
    Arizona
    I've come across so many prairie rattlers it's almost a miracle I haven't been bitten. Almost all of them have been while mounting biking. I have dozens of photos of the things. I've run over them (what can I say, weaving in and out of brush on singletrack at high speed, it's bound to happen), bunny hopped them, waited for them to get out of the way (my preferred approach), forced them to split when they were being stubborn....I get so tired of seeing the things I'm happy as can be when I see a bull snake or kingsnake, both of which will kill rattlers. Things are vermin as far as I'm concerned. Only one has reared/coiled to strike at me, because I ran him over before I realized it and he didn't like that much. I've completely lost my natural fear of them and that's probably a bad thing.

    Never had a bad experience with yotes, other than a group trying to lure/kill our dog. A few good stings on the butt with an airgun and they never came around again. I even had one try to play with me once. He playfully chased me on my bike, ears up, and when I stopped and turned around he got into the play stance, ears up, bouncing a little. It was pretty funny. I then charged him to run him off, and went about my bike ride. CO yotes are big and furry and healthy. AZ yotes look all scrawny and mangy and desperate. I'd be a lot more worried about AZ yotes.
     
  16. radd

    radd Country Gent

    Dec 27, 2017
    Santa Cruz
    The environmental issues regarding the critters we share the planet with are complicated. We once indiscriminately exterminated any species we did not like or that tasted good. We are smarter now realizing things like how much healthier different herd animals are with wolves back in their environment. Unfortunately everything we do has both a positive and negative reaction. The answers are complicated

    Folks that feel strongly on either side of these issues are able to get involved and work towards the type of change they would like to see.

    Back when I was young I had all the answers....Now, not a clue...:(
     
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  17. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    As a Biologist/Ecologist working in plant and animal conservation all my adult life I see the issues very clearly.

    Our species cannot survive on this planet in isolation - we need wildlife and top predators like Coyotes are critically important to the health of ecosystems, and therefore our own economic and social health.

    Many rural parts of Australia are currently experiencing a mouse plague costing farmers billions of $$. One of the major reasons for this is that the predators of mice have been wiped out. Things like mouse plagues are a sure indicator of an ecosystem out of balance and spiralling out of control.

    Also, these animals have a right to live and evolve too.
    Who set us up as "God" to decide what is worthy of existence on this planet.
    We've set ourselves up as "God" and have made an unbeleivable mess of it.

    If Aussies can peacefully co-exist with Crocodylus porosus (see pic) with a population estimated at 250,000 (and growing yearly) then Nth Americans can certainly do same with some relatively inoffensive Coyotes :D

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2021
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  18. juks

    juks Synchromatic

    716
    Nov 26, 2020
    Fremont, California
    I will never want to visit Aussie bush. Cities yes. I saw some documentary of all the deadly creepie crawlies you have. Mimosa by the pool will be just fine for me. :D
     
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  19. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    As someone who loves the deadly creepy crawlies I've simply learnt to peacefully co-exist with them and then to appreciate the wondrous awe and beauty in them.

    And what a dull and boring world it would be without the wonder of a Taipan, a saltwater crocodile, or even the humble Coyote. Do we want to leave our children a world with no Tigers, no Wolves and no Eagles.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2021
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  20. juks

    juks Synchromatic

    716
    Nov 26, 2020
    Fremont, California
    No we don't want to do that. But I have a clear division of tasks. They take care of the balance in the nature and I enjoy the mimosa :D.

    Those mammals I would not mind observing but its the red backs and Sydney funnel webs and flying biting kinds I don't want to meet. I've done couple of safari drives in South Africa and that was one of the most memorable experiences. We saw a cheetah mom with kittens which apparently was very rare occasion.
     
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