If You Were the Czar of Music

DennisC

Country Gent
May 11, 2017
1,337
Germany
No rules. Anarchy in the UK, Anarchy in the US, Anarchy all over.

One exception - changing out lyrics would be banned. "And no religion, too" being changed into "And one religion, too" is such an ignorant thing to do ... if John had wanted to say that, he'd have said that. Obviously, there are people who think if they like someone's music, they get to decide what is to be said within it ... which I strongly disagree to.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,708
Petaluma
Having a Czar of music would kill music. Elvis among many others would have been sent to a Siberian prison.

So I would say people should enjoy thr music they like and get over the music they don't. And stop being a grumpy old person about music.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,451
South Dakota
Having a Czar of music would kill music. Elvis among many others would have been sent to a Siberian prison.

So I would say people should enjoy thr music they like and get over the music they don't. And stop being a grumpy old person about music.
I reserve the right to be a grumpy old Jarhead any time I want! Sometimes I listen to bad music just so I can grump out!
 

drmilktruck

I Bleed Orange
May 17, 2009
19,258
Plymouth, MN
Having a Czar of music would kill music. Elvis among many others would have been sent to a Siberian prison.

So I would say people should enjoy thr music they like and get over the music they don't. And stop being a grumpy old person about music.

Sadly what I usually get grumpy about is picayune stuff. For the most part, popular music has become staid and conservative, the rebellion is long gone. Too much money. Even acts that aim to shock are unoriginal. Been there, done that. (I have to laugh at the rare person with a Mohawk now. That's over 40 years old. Dreadlocks? That's 50 years old in popular culture. Even mullets are from the 80s. Tie dye? 60s. Satanic stuff? 70s. While people here rant about rap, it originated in the 70s and gangsta rap came along in the 80s.)
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,708
Petaluma
Sadly what I usually get grumpy about is picayune stuff. For the most part, popular music has become staid and conservative, the rebellion is long gone. Too much money. Even acts that aim to shock are unoriginal. Been there, done that. (I have to laugh at the rare person with a Mohawk now. That's over 40 years old. Dreadlocks? That's 50 years old in popular culture. Even mullets are from the 80s. Tie dye? 60s. Satanic stuff? 70s. While people here rant about rap, it originated in the 70s and gangsta rap came along in the 80s.)
I have a matrix of non-comformity. What you speak of is in the conforming non- conformist; i.e. not conforming to general society but in a conforming manner. A similar term would be sub culture.

But really use 40, 50, 60 and beyond really don't know or understand the new generations. We try to overlay our own perspective on the new generations but that is inherently flawed as implicitly you are saying "you need to rebel in a specific way that I consider rebelliois". In other words, it is another manner of conforming non-conformism.

Sure old generations rebelled by a certain hairstyle or wearing certain clothes. After that has been established it is just a style. Why should we expect new generations to rebel in the same way? Why should they have to make up a completely new hair style, just to please old people? Dreadlocks is not rebellion, it is a conforming hair do for certain cultures.

So I would argue that your grumpy old man-ness is just an further extension of well being a grumpy old person.

And it begs the question: why feel the need to judge others at all?
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,451
South Dakota
And it begs the question: why feel the need to judge others at all?

hahaha, I like to go to the mall or downtown just so I can watch the weirdos and make fun of them, but some of them know me and make fun of me so we are even in the end! I fear I have become one of the guys in the box on the muppets show! Not quite that old yet but I think the attitude is there!
 
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drmilktruck

I Bleed Orange
May 17, 2009
19,258
Plymouth, MN
I have a matrix of non-comformity. What you speak of is in the conforming non- conformist; i.e. not conforming to general society but in a conforming manner. A similar term would be sub culture.

But really use 40, 50, 60 and beyond really don't know or understand the new generations. We try to overlay our own perspective on the new generations but that is inherently flawed as implicitly you are saying "you need to rebel in a specific way that I consider rebelliois". In other words, it is another manner of conforming non-conformism.

Sure old generations rebelled by a certain hairstyle or wearing certain clothes. After that has been established it is just a style. Why should we expect new generations to rebel in the same way? Why should they have to make up a completely new hair style, just to please old people? Dreadlocks is not rebellion, it is a conforming hair do for certain cultures.

So I would argue that your grumpy old man-ness is just an further extension of well being a grumpy old person.

And it begs the question: why feel the need to judge others at all?

This veered off into an unexpected direction. It started as a tongue in cheek suggestion of being a music czar, as if such a thing could ever exist and suddenly it was taken seriously. Young folks can rebel however they want, it’s always the way it’s been. Each new generation acts like they’re the first ones ever to experience growing up, although nothing is new under the sun. Old people can complain about young people as they always have. Part of it of is envy, missing that time when the future was still open. Part of it is relief, that I’ll never have to go through that again.

As you are now, so once was I. As I am now, so you too will be.
 
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Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,859
Tucson
Interesting subject and some interesting comments. Ultimately, music is a reflection of society. Stephen Foster was a product of his times, but he’d be little more than a curiosity today. Music is always changing.

Pop/Top-40 and I parted company when click tracks and synthesizer sequences became preponderant. I like auto-tune even less, or any heavily processed vocals, for that matter. If I can do six vocal takes with no hope of making money for all of my effort, some rich Pop star can stay at it until they get it right.

Ultimately, every generation sees change. My father was no fan of Rock n’ Roll, and he probably would not have liked the direction music has taken in the decades since his passing. My tastes were influenced by him, but extended farther along the timeline, because I was a generation younger. (He was actually pretty tolerant of my tastes.)

But now I see my own tastes becoming outdated. Perhaps it’s a natural consequence as time passes. what would Mozart or Back have thought of auto-tune, or Buddy Holly, or Elvis, or Benny Goodman, or Satchmo, or Stephen Foster? Maybe even Stephen Foster would not have been up to their standards. It would be interesting to know how every stage of musical development would have looked to the classical masters. We build upon their work, but would they approve?

There is another element to this, and that is the changing nature of the music business. The way music is produced has changed and the way that money is invested in music has changed. Obviously, no one wants to invest in music that they can’t make a profit on, but it seems like the focus has changed drastically, with greater emphasis on visual flash, and less upon quality music. Perhaps that is simply the most recent steps in a long process. Les Paul and Mary Ford were highly visible, with television appearances (and their own show), long before MTV.

Had I some mystical power over music, I would not wield it upon musicians, producers, investors, or anyone else in the business. Instead, I would like for music consumers to be more aware and less willing to accept music, simply because it’s hyped. I was fortunate to be raised listening to a wide variety of music, from early Jazz, to Big Band, to Crooners, to Chet, to the Ventures, and even to classical. This gave me a musical yardstick that was very useful. I wish this for every listener.
 

Floo

Country Gent
Dec 16, 2012
1,698
Elmshorn, Germany
I would like for music consumers to be more aware and less willing to accept music, simply because it’s hyped.

Now that would be good, if listeners really developed a taste of their own, not just following some hype. But it seems to be difficult to be different.
I'm actually considering buying a tweed suit for everyday, just to be a counterpoint to today's clothing...
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
25,859
Tucson
Now that would be good, if listeners really developed a taste of their own, not just following some hype. But it seems to be difficult to be different.
I'm actually considering buying a tweed suit for everyday, just to be a counterpoint to today's clothing...
It’s sad, but most music these days if hype, and hype only. Some of it is good music, but a lot of garbage gets promoted, as well.
 


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