I’m losing a good friend.

Jelly Roll Horton

Country Gent
Nov 10, 2017
1,852
Portland, OR
While Parkenson's is not the same, it still robs us of people we love like Alzheimers. I have a great friend that has shared the stage w me for many yrs playing n singing. Ironically like with your pal. My friend Dr. Dan was also a Big handsome man that we would refer to as sunshine, cuz when he walked into the building the place lit up. Parkensons has its horrible hand on him now, in fact its the plus version so he's been downed to being wheeled around, and recently had to get a trache in order to swallow food. He's still fighting the good fight to play his guitar and mando, even trying to still sing w that new device. He's so talented as a picker and singer, then this sh#t had to mow him over over the years. Dr Dan is not done blessing his family and every day is a gift still, I must say. He wrote a book about his fight, its still on amazon I think. All to say I feel for you, I know what this stuff does first hand, I've watched his family struggle and fight along side him. ... I'm so sorry to hear about your friend's battle.
I lost a very good friend, Bill Boslaugh, in Sept. 2019 in almost identical circumstances, Parkinsons and dementia. We formed a jug band in college in 1965 and played together and stayed together as a band until his passing. What’s left of the band still gets together, but without Bill it’s pretty sad. @radd, I’m sorry for you and your friend, and for all of those here who have or will experience this.
 

rcboals

Country Gent
Nov 21, 2008
4,807
Springfield Oregon
My personal experience with this insidious disease. My father, my mother in law, and my good friend Phil at his age of 58 years old. This is not so hard on the person with Alzheimer's but is devastating for those family and friends who loved these people for so long. It really turns into "the long goodbye". If you haven't seen the Glen Campbell movie documentary "I'll Be Me" watch it and have some tissues close by.

 
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radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,539
Home
My personal experience with this insidious disease. My father, my mother in law, and my good friend Phil at his age of 58 years old. This is not so hard on the person with Alzheimer's but is devastating for those family and friends who loved these people for so long. It really turns into "the long goodbye". If you haven't seen the Glen Campbell movie documentary "I'll Be Me" watch it and have some tissues close by.



My wife and I never budged from our seats during the duration of that lengthy documentary because we found it to be so amazing.

Truly a must see.

I bought this Ovation over 40 yrs ago because of Glen and I still have it.

267E98B6-256B-4C35-8B47-0907943C637E.jpeg
 

JC higgy

Gretschified
Jun 6, 2008
11,662
Belfast Norn Iron
Sorry to hear this sir.

We've had a few family members recently past and currently battling this shizzel.
Give me a massive heart attack any day.
 
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GlenP

Country Gent
Jul 23, 2019
2,194
WA
Deepest sympathies to all who have friends and family impacted by this. I lost my mom to this some years ago. My dad did a great job at hiding her condition from all of us, and when he passed we did not fully understand her total dependence on him and her inability to live independently. It soon became apparent and we found a nice memory care assisted living home for her, she did really well there. Having several brothers and sisters to help in the process, especially one who stepped up and really took charge of things, made things manageable.
 

mrfixitmi

Country Gent
Mar 20, 2010
1,802
Michigan
I am sorry for all of those afflicted by this terrible disease. It not only is terrible for those with it, but a heavier burden on the family. My prayers go out to everyone who has been tormented by this awful disease. For my wife and I, when my Father in Law got it, and it was as bad or worse for us as when my Mother in Law was dying from cancer. Words of sorrow cannot do justice to those suffering.
 

juks

Country Gent
Nov 26, 2020
1,826
Fremont, California
So sorry to hear. It's a terrible disease. My grandmother had it. Brain is a weird thing. She had spoken Swedish as a child but never used the language for the rest of her life. Until the disease took over. Then she only spoke Swedish, perfectly. So weird that it was stored somewhere in the brain.
 
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radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,539
Home
So sorry to hear. It's a terrible disease. My grandmother had it. Brain is a weird thing. She had spoken Swedish as a child but never used the language for the rest of her life. Until the disease took over. Then she only spoke Swedish, perfectly. So weird that it was stored somewhere in the brain.


My uncle was a wonderful very polite gentleman who hardly ever swore. He was a Marine in WWII and in the later phase of Alzheimer’s he would constantly tell off color jokes from his Marine days. I remember him in the locked memory unit sitting across from his overweight son and myself and every few minutes he would look at his son who he did not recognize anymore and say. “#&$& your sure fat”. My cousin would just look at me a shrug.
 

Merc

Friend of Fred
May 6, 2017
5,424
Florida
Sorry to hear. My Grandmother had it before passing.

My only other personal experience is my retired neighbors which is a bit of a different experience. We moved in 2015 and I watched it go from conversation to what sounded like mumbling. He continued to personally care for her full time up until last year in a super loving way. The isolation of not going to support meetings the last two years because of the unmentionable, took its tole and sped things further. He finally realized he couldn’t provide the necessary care, so she went into a care center. The socialization and everything has helped a lot and she’ll now say certain sentences. Every time I ask about her after he visits, his eyes light up when he talks about her. Just a beautiful thing to see that his love hasn’t wained and he values every moment with her. He still sees the same women he fell in love despite everything.

On another note… I watched this a few years back on the effects of music on the brain with Alzheimer’s as well as Parkinson’s. Pretty incredible to watch and I hope more studies are conducted.

 

Highroller

Country Gent
Jun 11, 2015
1,847
Portland, OR
Yeah, sorry to hear you're going thru this, Radd. I've got some experience there too. Both my parents. Not much fun.

And the scary thing about it is that because of them, it leaves me with a higher probability of going that path too. Someday, I might just wake up and not remember Gretsch-Talk!

That'll be a drag. Nice knowing you guys! o_O


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radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,539
Home
Yeah, sorry to hear you're going thru this, Radd. I've got some experience there too. Both my parents. Not much fun.

And the scary thing about it is that because of them, it leaves me with a higher probability of going that path too. Someday, I might just wake up and not remember Gretsch-Talk!

That'll be a drag. Nice knowing you guys! o_O


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I know, my moms side of the family, every one of her 8 siblings that lived into their 80’s went that way…. My daughters tease me in a sweet way about my possible future:eek:
 


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