Humidifiers

jfassett

Synchromatic
Dec 9, 2017
809
Tucson
Love to hear thoughts on using humidifiers for all guitars, acoustic, hollow and solid body as well.
I live in a very dry climate (Tucson)
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
Are you talking about an in-guitar humidifier or a room humidifier? Typically, 50% is the recommended moisture level, but the real answer is that you want to match the humidity of the shop that made your guitar. This being said, the only ones that mater are your acoustic guitars. Most hollow body guitars are plywood and won't be as impacted by the climate. Solid body shouldn't care one bit.
 

jfassett

Synchromatic
Dec 9, 2017
809
Tucson
Are you talking about an in-guitar humidifier or a room humidifier? Typically, 50% is the recommended moisture level, but the real answer is that you want to match the humidity of the shop that made your guitar. This being said, the only ones that mater are your acoustic guitars. Most hollow body guitars are plywood and won't be as impacted by the climate. Solid body shouldn't care one bit.
Thanks! Really wondering about "in guitar or case humidifiers and if they're effective or not. With the solid body guitars, I was thinking more about the neck than anything else.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
Thanks! Really wondering about "in guitar or case humidifiers and if they're effective or not. With the solid body guitars, I was thinking more about the neck than anything else.

I don't think necks are affected negatively by low humidity, but someone else can share their experiences. Solid wood wafts and warps as it gets dryer or more humid. Over time, this can wreck the construction of your guitar if you don't treat it carefully. But it takes extremes to create serious problems.

I don't think the in-case humidifiers can be all that effective unless you're religious about keeping them filled up.
 

dafreeze

Friend of Fred
I'm in a desert climate myself where relative humidity is frequently <30%. Most guitar manufacturers recommend 40-50%. I have a number of guitars and it made more sense for me to humidify the whole house. Dry environment isn't the most healthy for people either and 40-50% is also ideal for us. Most folks in my area have no central air, but base board heating so a central unit isn't an option.

This is my second of these in 10 years, first lasted 8.

https://www.amazon.com/Honeywell-Co...40485389&sr=8-5&keywords=honeywell+humidifier

I also have a remote house thermometer/humidity indicator.
 

MKunie

Country Gent
Feb 8, 2012
1,039
Vegas,USA
Love to hear thoughts on using humidifiers for all guitars, acoustic, hollow and solid body as well.
I live in a very dry climate (Tucson)
When I moved to Vegas from Maryland,
I have a whole house humidifier very good unit, (https://aircareproducts.com/4dts900-console.html) This is a newer model than mine, but basically the same.
So I keep the guitars in the case and get some soap travel containers, And heat up a screwdriver to make holes, And cut to fit, 2 cellulose sponges, and keep them moist. This helps tremendously. I did much research to get this setup, and it works fantastically!
BUT I am sure this is what you need and not too expensive! I hope this helps you! Mark
 

thunder58

Super Moderator
Staff member
Dec 23, 2010
27,175
tappan ny
In my cases only ..... I use a Herco humidifier ( looks like the same size that of a small jar of Vicks vapor rub ) in the headstock area of the case , the snake type in the sound hole and I drilled several holes in a " travel soap " holder with a damp sponge in it . ( found them cheap at CVS ) When I bought my 12 string Martin at the factory , they gave me the Oasis blue tube that sits on the strings and goes into the sound hole . It's filled with a gel and you add water into the tube and insert it . As the water dissipates , the tube shrinks . PROBLEM ... I found a small bit of gel in the guitar . Thank goodness it did not stain . Tube went right into the garbage .
Need a Hygrometer for the case too ....... google Dr. foster and Smith veterinarian supplies . Key word ..thermo hygrometer .. look for Flukers Thermo hygrometer ... it's half the price of the Oasis and it's the same thing
 

Phil Rose

Electromatic
Sep 28, 2018
33
New Zealand
I don't think necks are affected negatively by low humidity, but someone else can share their experiences. Solid wood wafts and warps as it gets dryer or more humid. Over time, this can wreck the construction of your guitar if you don't treat it carefully. But it takes extremes to create serious problems.

I don't think the in-case humidifiers can be all that effective unless you're religious about keeping them filled up.

My powerjet that I recently purchased (2014, little to no use and in storage in the case for most of it's life) had to be re-fretted when I took it in for a setup (had lifted frets, the luthier thought possibly due to storage in a low humidity environment). Strange though as in NZ we generally have the opposite problem - too much humidity, and we often use dehumidifiers. Maybe the guy had it in a storage room with a dehumidifier going all the time or something? Anyway, after the re-fret I won't be keeping my new jet in the closet with the dehumidifier going I reckon!
 

LivingMyDream

Friend of Fred
May 4, 2016
6,824
Peculiar, Missouri
This is one I use with my solid wood Taylor and Epiphone. It's a two-way system, because when the air is too dry, it releases moisture. Then, when it's too humid it will absorb moisture. It works very well for me here in Tennessee. In the Fall and coldest part of winter, the air can get very dry, while it can get pretty humid at times throughout the rest of the year. My humidifier/dehumidifier has been going strong for nearly 3 years now, and continues showing on sign of fall down on the job.

421147000001000-00-500x500.jpg
 

somebodyelseuk

Country Gent
Jan 22, 2013
1,128
Birmingham, UK
Shouldn't be necessary for most solids since they're sealed in a plastic skin. The rest... if you live in a dry part of the world, fair enough, but I wonder about problems caused by constantly changing conditions... like the advice about keepng windows closed to keep polution out - the air inside yer building is the same as the air outside it, see 'laws of physics'.

What did people use 60 years ago? I'll use that.
 

Robbie

Friend of Fred
Jun 17, 2013
5,838
Sarnia Ontario Canada
I don't play/own acoustics, my Reverend PA-1 would be the closest, the rest are Semis and Solid body. I keep a Herco humidifier (they're inexpensive) in each guitar case and my guitars stay in their cases unless they are being played. Humidity in the guitar case stays right around 50%.
Does it help? Honestly, I don't know but it makes me feel better
Does it hurt? Not so far and it's be a lot of years
I've never had to deal with protruding frets so I'll stick with what I do.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,785
South Dakota
I am a big fan of Oasis in case or sound hole humidifiers. I also use a console humidifier but sadly I need it more in the winter and the thing works like a swamp cooler, exactly what you don’t need in South Dakota humidifyin your room.

Those of you in the desert know what a swamp cooler is. Nothing but a evaporative air conditioner.

For my music room I am thinking about building a fountain that would effectively evaporate water into the air without the air conditioning effect the console has.

As for necks, I see quite a change in my neck relief, especially my Aerodyne strat from summer to winter humidity. It is also the only electric not in a hard case. The only instruments I have oasis in right now are my acoustics but shortly I will have them in all my cases.

My intention was to build a small display case that would house all my stringed instruments but I have not done that yet.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
This is one I use with my solid wood Taylor and Epiphone. It's a two-way system, because when the air is too dry, it releases moisture. Then, when it's too humid it will absorb moisture. It works very well for me here in Tennessee. In the Fall and coldest part of winter, the air can get very dry, while it can get pretty humid at times throughout the rest of the year. My humidifier/dehumidifier has been going strong for nearly 3 years now, and continues showing on sign of fall down on the job.

421147000001000-00-500x500.jpg

Do you have a humidity gauge in your guitar case (s)?
 

LivingMyDream

Friend of Fred
May 4, 2016
6,824
Peculiar, Missouri
Do you have a humidity gauge in your guitar case (s)?

No. I was going to do that, but then I noticed that my humidifier pack plumped up humid days, and slimmed out when dry weather came, just as advertised. Since then I haven't worried about it much, and the guitars are doing well. Of course, I always keep my acoustics in their cases when they are not being played, so there isn't a major fluctuation unless the humidity or dry winter air gets really bad.

I will say that last winter the air got so dry that I had to buy a humidifier for my bedroom, because my skin was suffering. Not being in my humidified bedroom, though, my acoustics survived quite well.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
No. I was going to do that, but then I noticed that my humidifier pack plumped up humid days, and slimmed out when dry weather came, just as advertised. Since then I haven't worried about it much, and the guitars are doing well. Of course, I always keep my acoustics in their cases when they are not being played, so there isn't a major fluctuation unless the humidity or dry winter air gets really bad.

I will say that last winter the air got so dry that I had to buy a humidifier for my bedroom, because my skin was suffering. Not being in my humidified bedroom, though, my acoustics survived quite well.

I get that dry stuff in the winter too, especially sinuses. But my guitars stay in my basement which is always 50% all year round. So lucky me.
 

LivingMyDream

Friend of Fred
May 4, 2016
6,824
Peculiar, Missouri
I get that dry stuff in the winter too, especially sinuses. But my guitars stay in my basement which is always 50% all year round. So lucky me.

Yes, like you, I have a basement that usually stays more humid, although even that felt dry last winter. Literally, as the dry air persisted, I wasn't able to sleep due to my dry skin getting inflamed and painful. In desperation, I got any humidifier I could find, then I found a better one online. With the dry air, and the cold driving my heater into overdrive, the humidity in the house was around 20%. I hope I never go through that again.
 

Bertotti

Friend of Fred
Jul 20, 2017
9,785
South Dakota
I get that dry stuff in the winter too, especially sinuses. But my guitars stay in my basement which is always 50% all year round. So lucky me.
I have never checked the humidity in my basement but I doubt it is any more humid down there in the winter then it is up top but it is worth’s shot! My room floats about 27-30% and drops from there in the winters. This year I ran a humidifier until mid September and it was humid outside but the house was so dry from winter it just sucked up the moisture. Outside was around 90% inside the hugest it ever got was 50%. Without the humidifier it is now down to 43% inside.

Yes, like you, I have a basement that usually stays more humid, although even that felt dry last winter. Literally, as the dry air persisted, I wasn't able to sleep due to my dry skin getting inflamed and painful. In desperation, I got any humidifier I could find, then I found a better one online. With the dry air, and the cold driving my heater into overdrive, the humidity in the house was around 20%. I hope I never go through that again.
Mid 20s isn’t uncommon in my house in the winter. I need a much better way to humidify my house.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
I have never checked the humidity in my basement but I doubt it is any more humid down there in the winter then it is up top but it is worth’s shot! My room floats about 27-30% and drops from there in the winters. This year I ran a humidifier until mid September and it was humid outside but the house was so dry from winter it just sucked up the moisture. Outside was around 90% inside the hugest it ever got was 50%. Without the humidifier it is now down to 43% inside.


Mid 20s isn’t uncommon in my house in the winter. I need a much better way to humidify my house.

It's difficult to humidify a whole house - it takes a lot of water. I have a humidifier attached to my AC/Heat and dumps a lot of water into the system but barely raises it. My basement isn't as much of a problem in that it stays cooler, so not as dried out by the heat.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,167
Atlanta
Yes, like you, I have a basement that usually stays more humid, although even that felt dry last winter. Literally, as the dry air persisted, I wasn't able to sleep due to my dry skin getting inflamed and painful. In desperation, I got any humidifier I could find, then I found a better one online. With the dry air, and the cold driving my heater into overdrive, the humidity in the house was around 20%. I hope I never go through that again.

So do I!
 

loudnlousy

Gretschified
Oct 18, 2015
12,548
Germany
Ever since I used that simple little plastic humidifier box (with a little foam inside) my hollowbodies stay in great shape. No neck adjustments, no warping, no problems.
 


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