How to Organize Your Music

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by drmilktruck, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Most of what has happened, by sheer volume, has happened fairly recently. The economy has grown in the Tech sector, which is all 1s and 0s, or equipment made to process 1s and 0s. The amazing thing is that a lot of what has been accomplished could be wiped away if the 1s and 0s disappeared ... and they easily could.

    I’m amazed that things work as well as they do, but there are things I’ve seen which serve as reminders of just how tenuous all of this is.
    A word to the wise. Do not even have a debit card. New credit cards with chips are fairly safe, but the weak link has always been data at rest, including payment information. Sadly, this favors large businesses over small businesses, because large businesses can afford to take measures to protect credit card information that are out of reach for small businesses. While I’m not exactly in love with the company, PayPal is a pretty good idea.

    The news isn’t all bad. There are successes happening every day and commerce continues to operate. It’s much like driving over Red Mountain Pass, in Colorado. As long as you stay on the road, you’re just fine, but even the very thought of going over the edge is beyond frightening.
     
  2. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    PC, External Drives, Phone, Tablet, Thumb Drive, multiple cloud backup sites.... The chances that they ALL fail is fairly slim.
     
  3. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    One EMP would do the trick.
     
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  4. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    True, but it would probably be the end of us anyway.... The airplane manufacturers and the military do a pretty good job at shielding for this sort of thing, maybe I'll turn my home office into a Faraday Cage!
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    We should all be living in Faraday Cages. :) I think this circles back to Wabash’s point; it would be pretty easy to erase many of our accomplishments.
     
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  6. HypotenusLuvTriangle

    HypotenusLuvTriangle Country Gent

    Oct 27, 2010
    Whittier, Ca
    I organize alfabetically with disregard to musical styles/genres. However, I do separate compilations and soundtracks into their own section because, well, its not the same.
    My itunes as well. Its all alfabetical with proper genres labeled so I can sorta via genre if I want to.

    This brings in an issue with Christmas music.... so... like, I need to do multiple genres because there's a lot of great stuff that is also Christmas music that is either on soundtracks or done in specific genres.
     
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  7. Chmason85

    Chmason85 Gretschie

    369
    May 1, 2018
    Philadelphia
    I listen to a lot of old punk and still have all my cds. I group them by band in order, and then all bands together from the west coast/east coast etc. So my favorite band is X and I have all of their albums next to FEAR albums, dead Kennedy’s all together. East coast the same; misfits, New York dolls, Ramones etc.
     
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  8. johnny g

    johnny g Country Gent

    Sep 2, 2017
    union, ms
    I wish I was organized. I got some over here and some over there and some in a box in the closet.
    I use the net too much. I just like watching the artist play and what he is playing and the singing.
    One day I tried to make it a nice little organized package and then my kids and grand kids got in to it and that was that.
     
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  9. Henry

    Henry I Bleed Orange

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    To say that digital is subject to destruction misses what digital is. It is a LANGUAGE, not a medium, albeit one written with just 0s and 1s. Just because books can be burned does not mean that English will disappear.

    The first digital machines were in fact analog - they used paper cards or other physical material. You could theoretically write it into a sheet of metal that will last longer than any papyrus. Of course that defeats the purpose of digital, which is efficient reading by a non-human machine.

    The other advantage of digital that offsets its destructible by being easily duplicated. That CD may degrade, but there are thousands of the CD available, as well as other archives

    With the papyrus, there is just that one piece. Of course, a wise person would make a digital backup. :p

    Lastly, its not like digital has replaced physical. In fact, there are more paper books being published now than ever in history, by every measure. But printing simply could not physically keep up with the volume of content being created digitally. So the papyrus option is not really practical.

    Papyrus works fine, when less than 1% of the population can actually read.
     
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  10. JC higgy

    JC higgy Friend of Fred

    Age:
    49
    Jun 6, 2008
    Belfast Norn Iron
    My cd's are mostly by artist, although i just put them down were there is space these days,tapes are random,although i haven't played any in yonks,vinyl by artist ,again,i haven't played any in donkeys years.
    I have my dads vinyl in alphabetical order ,regardless of genre .

    I'm a proud Luddite , don't trust anything techy.
     
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  11. Cassotto

    Cassotto Gretschie

    Age:
    46
    366
    Jun 16, 2019
    Spain
    I don't know much about the technology involved in CD producing, but they said that the plastic they use(d) would degrade with time, in a way other types of plastic (vinyl, for example), wouldn't. It's true I heard this a very long time ago, in the nineties, so perhaps they are made somewhat differently nowadays. Anyway, my oldest CDs are the Beatles' first two albums (which my grandmother gave me as a birthday present in 1994), and they still play perfectly.

    As I said, the only problems I've had is with a few old CD-Rs. As Sabato says, one could suspect the CD player, but consistently, the same player would play other CDs, and the CD-Rs would do funny things in different players. The problem was always the same: the CD-R was playing all right, but suddently, strange noises started to happen at a fixed frequency, which increased as the minutes went by, until they were so continuous that you couldn't hear the music at all. I don't know how to describe these noises: I might say they remind me of the noise you make when you puff heavily. I've never had too many CD-R, and this happened to four or five which weren't from the same batch (in fact, they were bootlegs which I bought in different shops at different times, so it's not as if I had been sold a defective box of CD-Rs). When I bought a new hi-fi system, I tried the CD-Rs, and the only difference is that it took more time for them to start making the noises, but they always ended up making them.

    And one thing I can say is not a single one of my CDs or CD-Rs is scratched. They go directly from the box to the player and back, I hold them by the edges... Most look like new.
     
  12. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    I have a big ass collection, totally unorganized but i know where all my KISS, Sabbath and Zep iso_O
    and Peg Leg Howell and Ironing Board Sam........y'all know?

    And Ike Turner, cant forget him, i got a couple of his Fender model guitar's.

    Stratocaster i think they're called:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2020
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  13. wilblee

    wilblee Synchromatic

    988
    May 23, 2013
    TX Hill Country
    All my physical media is organized in boxes in a corner of my studio. Gold and special edition CDs are grouped with the occasional SACD. Everything else is in only-God-knows order. I keep them in case of electronic catastrophe.
     
  14. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Gretschie

    216
    Nov 18, 2019
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    One reason I've heard that CDs could potentially last a long time is that they're read by a laser, so there's no physical contact to wear them down when you play them. On the other hand, a record is typically played with a needle, and the needle scratching the record every time it's played can wear it down over time. I've heard of a record player that uses a laser (for no physical contact), but they're very expensive.

    I also treat my CDs well, and none of mine have scratches either.
     
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  15. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    The first time a record is played, all info over 15KHz is wiped out. Not that I can hear it, however.
     
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  16. Cassotto

    Cassotto Gretschie

    Age:
    46
    366
    Jun 16, 2019
    Spain
    :confused:
     
  17. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Each time a record is played, the needle will do some amount of damage, The very first time it is played, the tiny variations which represent the very highest overtones suffer a degree of damage. There's a science to mastering vinyl, with significant limitations that newer formats do not have. For those reasons, the bass must be panned to the center and the highest of the highs are subject to limitations of the media, itself.

    IMO, what most people perceive as the warmth of vinyl is actually the way vinyl had to be mastered, which changed the perceived timbre of it all. As much of an innovation as the 33 RPM album was, it was pretty limited compared to formats available today.
     
  18. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Supposedly, the aluminum coating on CDs will eventually fall/flake off.

    I've had some direct to disc LPs (half as many steps between master and final product---very limited) and the crispness of the signal was amazing. It sizzled!

    When I first got into CDs in the '80s, I was amazed as to how much high end I was missing when I got Santana's "Abraxas".
     
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