How to Organize Your Music

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by drmilktruck, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Gretschie

    197
    Nov 18, 2019
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    I mainly have just CDs, and I always liked to just organize them alphabetically by artist, and then album by release date.
    I still have my CD collection, but they're packed in a couple boxes. I ripped my CDs to my computer years ago (to both FLAC and MP3 format) so I can listen to the MP3s on my devices. I still like to keep the CDs because they're my legit purchased copies, and they also act as a sort of backup for my music collection.

    For those who have said you got rid of all your CDs, I'm curious why you did so? Do you only stream music online these days?
     
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  2. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Gretschie

    197
    Nov 18, 2019
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    That's interesting.. I've always heard people say CDs can potentially last hundreds of years. I've heard of optical media degrading though. Perhaps the commercially-made discs last the longest and CD-Rs don't last as long, I'd guess. I've never actually had a problem with my CDs either, and I even have CD-Rs that I've been able to read many years later.

    The only time I had a problem with one was a re-writeable (CD-RW) - I thought it would be handy to be able to re-burn it if I needed to, but I tried to read the files from it just months after I burned it and my computer was having trouble reading it. They were some important files on it, and I found a program that would keep trying to read when it encountered problems. I let it go, and after several hours it was finally able to read & copy the files that were troublesome. Then I burned it all to a regular CD-R disc.
     
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  3. Sid Nitzerglobin

    Sid Nitzerglobin Country Gent

    Jun 8, 2015
    fROMOHIO
    Alphabetically by artists/composer here & then by chronological order of release.

    That is of course when they are actually organized ;)
     
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  4. Sabato

    Sabato Country Gent

    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    The CD player could fail (either the machine or you, haha) but there is little that can fail about a bunch of pits dug by lasers, unless they get scratched...
     
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  5. nickurso

    nickurso Gretschified

    Age:
    54
    Dec 24, 2012
    New Orleans la.
    When I had physical albums etc. I organized them by genre and then artist. I didn’t alphabetically organize artist just put all the muddy together and the zeppelin together
     
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  6. Hammerhands

    Hammerhands Country Gent

    Aug 26, 2011
    Winnipeg
    "Autobiographical - Chronological."

    Such a good movie.

    Mostly CDs.

    My storage systems were only so big, so they were eventually separated into sections, alphabetical. Although some solo albums are sorted in with their band of note.

    Rock. Jazz. Jazz Guitar. Classical & Other. Unreadable, broken, missing. Boxsets. Hi-Resolution.

    They are in drawers, cabinets, a media storage cabinet, a few CD holders and a shelf. I'm likely going to put them into plastic storage bins soon.

    I've got them on my NAS in mostly the same basic categories.

    The few albums are in a box.
     
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  7. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I organize strictly by first name, then last name.
     
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  8. toddfan

    toddfan Synchromatic

    841
    Mar 12, 2012
    Kansas
    I used to have about 3500 to 4000 LP's and about 2500 CD's...they were arranged alphabetically from A-Z by artist...last name for individual artists, then first name. Genre didn't matter.

    Now that I am in the digital age all of the LP's and 45's are gone (except for "special" favorite artists like Todd Rundgren [and related], Lloyd Cole, Kate Bush, Robyn Hitchcock and some others) and I am FAR LESS ORGANIZED on the computer system...I have several hard drives with music, and many have duplication from one the the other...also I have multiple copies of the same recording in different bit-rates and/or file types...mp3 @320, Flac, Iso, 24-96, etc.

    I need to clean up my digital files in a bad sort of way...lol.

    Fortunately, I use ROON for listening to the digital files, and no matter how messed up my hard drives are with duplicates, ROON finds them all and presents it in a pretty organized fashion.

    (And, all hard drives are backed up via an online backup service called Backblaze for $50 per year).
     
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  9. mrcoffee23

    mrcoffee23 Gretschie

    138
    Sep 23, 2009
    Virginia, USA
    Completely haphazardly.
     
  10. ramjac

    ramjac Synchromatic

    720
    Aug 14, 2011
    Wisconsin
    Separate sections for classical (alphabetical by composer) and soundtracks and compilations (alphabetical by title). The rest are alphabetical by artist and chronological within. Everything goes in sleeves unless it’s an OOP, rare or other edition where evidence supports it’s ability to justify the extra space. No oversized boxed sets. I no longer care about damaged plastic cases, which opened the door to buying used as well as the new ones online for $5 that always arrive damaged. Digipaks can be frustrating because, ironically, they take up more space.

    FAE5E6CE-2AA7-4DA2-B303-891EA8C1136C.jpeg
     
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  11. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Always keep your source material. Always.
     
  12. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I agree.
     
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  13. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    It's not just music that needs to be safely stored.

    I can listen to old records, even the early '78s. I know people with cylinder players. I can print photos from century old or earlier negatives. I know how to build a crystal radio that uses no power. I can keep a car or bike running that still uses points and plugs.

    I haven't messed with FORTRAN or COBOL in over 50 years. I doubt if the old IBM computer I once worked with is still around. Where would I find 80 or 96 column punch cards? Where is my old computer's tape backup? I can't play VHS or Beta video tapes anymore. How many times has Agent K had to buy The Beatles' "White Album"? Does your 8 track still work? We still have film from WWI. Video tape from the 1960s is gone. Often it was erased and reused. Great, that was a cost savings benefit, but no one thought to archive it.

    It used to be that listening to music took an effort. Getting the album out of it's cardboard sleeve, putting it on the turntable, cleaning the record with my Discwasher, setting the needle down on the groove (manual turntable---no stacking records either), then listening to the pop, hiss, and rumble sending the little hairs on the back of my neck up in anticipation of the first crash of chords, and settling in to listen. Getting up in 22 minutes to do it all over again. All that, and the usefulness of a double album sleeve.

    We learned how to read two forgotten languages when they decoded the Rosetta Stone's proclamations. We can still learn from the Romans and Vikings and Greeks by what they left carved in stone. We're learning things from 10,000 years ago at Globekli Tepe. The Gettysburg Address is 287 words, carved there in stone. The 1960 federal directives on the price of cabbage was 18K pages. How are the tweets of our leaders today going to be remembered or deciphered in a thousand years?

    One EMP glitch and our entire digital world will disappear. It is said that last year alone, people have taken more pictures digitally then ever taken with film since it was invented in 1826. Drop your cell phone and all your photos and music are gone forever. How much does a download cost these days? How can you recover it if it's lost? A lightning strike on a power line miles away can destroy your computer. Do you have everything on it backed up?

    Save your source material. Always.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2020
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  14. Henry

    Henry I Bleed Orange

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    I do it purely by "motivating" artist name, never by genre. By motivating artist name, it means the artist that convinced me to buy it or which makes this recording relevant to me. So if I just wanted a specific Beethoven piece, and don't really care which symphony performed it, it would go under Beethoven. If I got a Beethoven by the Kronos Quartet, it would probably go under Kronos.
     
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  15. Henry

    Henry I Bleed Orange

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    And always back up the source material at a separate location.
     
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  16. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    I keep my old photo negatives in my bank's safety deposit box.
     
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  17. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    A subject dear to my heart Gary.

    When I was a child, I thought it would be great to own a copy of North, To Alaska or The Music Man, because those were my favorite movies and I thought to would be great to be able to watch them when I wanted, and not on the off chance that a local theater or TV station would run them. I own both, these days, of course, along with hundreds of others. In my case, it’s cheaper to buy most movies on DVD that the travel required to rent and return something from the nearest Redbox. As a rule, I don’t rent online, in great part because it’s not much more costly to buy older movies on DVD than to rent them. Another way of saying the same thing would be to say that Amazon has changed the world.

    I believe in keeping my source materials, although most online music services allow you to download as needed. I buy from Amazon music or iTunes, when there are no CDs in print for the album I want to buy.

    Our digital world concerns me. I make my living working in this world, Security and business continuity concerns are part of my everyday experience. I just finished reading Cisco’s Security Core material for CCNPs and it reinforced something I have believed for a long time now; the subject of computer security is nearly limitless. Even more frightening are the ramifications of a failure to keep systems and networks secured.

    If that wasn’t enough, some of the worst problems are not malicious. For example, if you update the security certificates on a Cisco Call Manager and don’t do everything just right, you will end up having to visit every phone in person, before they will re-register with the system. The point here being that a well-intentioned update can knock devices off the network just as effectively as any malicious attack.

    All of the complexities of our digital world mean that things can easily go wrong. Nothing would surprise me, at this point. I’m glad that things are working and hope that they always will, but the degree to which the entire human race depends upon technology scares me.
     
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  18. dlew919

    dlew919 Synchromatic

    704
    Jul 18, 2016
    Sydney, Australia
    Digital is the most accurate copy, but the most fragile - one major world catastrophe and its all gone. We found the Dead Sea Scrolls after 2000 years - in good enough condition. I know I'm just repeating the point Wabash Slim made, but in terms of permanence, I think vellum or papyrus far outstrips something that can be destroyed by 20 volts instead of 12, or a sharp knock, or putting another electrical device too close.

    This isn't a 'Young People!' rant - I think digital is brilliant - but as a historian, I think about permanence...
     
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  19. GitBox Newbie

    GitBox Newbie Electromatic

    36
    Dec 18, 2014
    NYC
    My CD collection dates back to the early eighties.

    Jazz and Blues are one category, Rock, Pop and Country a second category, Soundtracks and Cast Albums a third category, classical a fourth category and finally a miscellaneous category.

    The first two categories are divided first by artist with studio albums arranged chronologically, then greatest hits types albums arranged chronologically, then finally live albums. At the end of the category are compilations.

    Soundtracks and cast albums are alphabetical.

    Classical is by composer, arranged chronologically by release date. Compiliations are filed at the end.

    Miscellaneous are filed last alphabetically.

    My vinyl is in the garage and filed pretty much the same way. My ancient boxes of cassettes are in the garage in no particular order.
     
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  20. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    To err is human. To really screw things up takes a computer. I rarely trust things I can see. It's impossible to trust a nameless hacker half a world away. I rarely do business online; I rarely use a credit card. It makes things harder, but I've never gotten my identity hacked.

    Trust no one.
     
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