How to cure a noisy neck

NewbieBob

Electromatic
Jul 18, 2020
37
New York City
I'm loving my G2420 but one thing is really annoying - the finish on the glossy neck makes a lot of noise under my hand when I play. The unfinished neck on my Squier strat makes zero noise but the Gretsch make a lot of noise. I know people sand the necks but I don't want my guitar to have a gorgeous finish finish except for a neck that looks all sanded down. Is there a way to keep it looking pretty while knocking down the finish so it's not so noisy? Will it settle down the more I play? The neck is slippery enough under my hand but it just makes little groaning sounds when I apply pressure to make chords and notes.
Thanks
 

jakjar123

Electromatic
Feb 14, 2021
93
UK
Do you mean a squeak that the strings make when you move your hand over them? That would be down to fresh strings and/or your technique. Glossy necks tend to get sticky, so that's why some people prefer satin finished as they are much "smoother" when moving and sliding.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,540
Petaluma
Yep, matte the neck. I haven't done it myself but my luthier did it in Luke 6 minutes. I think some people use thr green scotch sponge pads.

But you may also be squeezing the neck too hard.

It won't get better. In fact, if you matte the neck, play over time may buff it back to a gloss.
 

Ricochet

Senior Gretsch-Talker
Nov 13, 2009
21,522
Monkey Island
Least invasive for the paint is Micro mesh sandpaper. The colour coded ones. Anywhere between 6000-8000 grit. For best results apply wet but dry works as well. Rub the neck down a couple of times. Repeat every two weeks or so. It just takes 10 seconds.

Micro mesh is a pricier than regular sandpaper but last practically forever. Simply rinse under running water.
 

Gretschmen65

Country Gent
May 20, 2016
1,119
QLD Australia
Funny, I've played satin back, natural waxed wood and high gloss necks and never given a thought to sanding a glossy one down.

For me it makes no difference. Body chemistry I guess.

No matter which neck I play I've never had "noise" produced from the back of a neck?
Occasionally when playing a sticky new nitro neck I have used Finger Ease (spray on lube ) which could get you through the new guitar period.
 

radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,672
Santa Cruz
I do it to every guitar, green Scotchbright pad or micro mesh pads, takes about a minute or two. Sometimes you have to do it again in a few months because your hand polishes it back up. Move up and down the neck in straight lines, not across the neck.

It you don’t like that option, something like Dunlop 65 spray polish will make it glass like with no stick. I have had to do that to new guitars with a nitrocellulose finish because the nitro can take a long time to harden up enough to sand effectively to matt the finish.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,540
Petaluma
Baby powder or cornstarch in the palm of your fretting hand
I really advise against this. It will work for about 5 or 10 minutes and then you will need more, and more. It's like an addiction. And then when you wash your hands you will have goo with corn starch. and baby powder isn't really good for you, especially if it has talcum.
 

GVDobler

Synchromatic
May 15, 2011
937
Las Vegas
Would liquid sandpaper work if just wiped on. That's the stuff you wipe down gloss paint on house woodwork so new paint will stick to it. Will not remove paint, only dull the surface.
Don't know just asking the forum.
 

radd

Friend of Fred
Dec 27, 2017
5,672
Santa Cruz
Would liquid sandpaper work if just wiped on. That's the stuff you wipe down gloss paint on house woodwork so new paint will stick to it. Will not remove paint, only dull the surface.
Don't know just asking the forum.

Why?

The Scotchbright pad is the go to item for this on just about any guitar forum you can find. It is cheap, very available, is tried and true and easy.

It works so well I used the method to knock the gloss of a new Fender brand aftermarket neck. You can see the before and after part way through the process.

Why take a chance on something new and unproven?

D49021B4-5F1E-479F-B88E-0BBF1C038DAF.jpeg
 
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Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,540
Petaluma
Yea, scothbrite is the way to go. Super easy, hard to over do it. just go slowly. My luthier did it in less than 10 minutes and didn't even charge me.
 

Jena

Synchromatic
Funny, I've played satin back, natural waxed wood and high gloss necks and never given a thought to sanding a glossy one down.

For me it makes no difference. Body chemistry I guess.

No matter which neck I play I've never had "noise" produced from the back of a neck?
Occasionally when playing a sticky new nitro neck I have used Finger Ease (spray on lube ) which could get you through the new guitar period.
Yup ... totally agree.
Sanding a neck ... uh, no.
Wear the finish down with your playin'
... let's the finish age with character and is better overall in everyway, imho

btw, I like maple too !
 

Tele295

Country Gent
Jun 4, 2008
2,770
Bigsby Springs, CA
I really advise against this. It will work for about 5 or 10 minutes and then you will need more, and more. It's like an addiction. And then when you wash your hands you will have goo with corn starch. and baby powder isn't really good for you, especially if it has talcum.

The same addiction could be said of products like Finger-ease!

If it gets goopy, the problem is sweaty hands, not the neck. Orchestra players (violin family) have done this for decades without a problem.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
18,540
Petaluma
Yep It's usually a combo of sweaty hands and gloss . . . I think the moisture against rhe glass like surface creates little vacuum seals, hence the stickiness. Matting deals with that.

Orchestra players probably don't play gloss instruments.

And no, you can't matte or satin by playing. Quite the opposite, your hands will polish the finish over time by wearing it down and resulting eventually in the gloss surface.
 


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