Country Classic Question

Discussion in 'THE Gretsch Discussion Forum' started by karhik, Sep 12, 2020.

  1. calebaaron666

    calebaaron666 Friend of Fred

    Aug 15, 2018
    Portland, Maine
    My 6120 is a preFMIC Gretsch from 1995. It has a 5 ply top and sound post. Built like tank. A Beautiful Tank. It’s awesome.

    I replaced the electronics with a new wiring harness from TV Jones as well as TVJ Ray Butts Ful-Fidelity Filter’Tron pickups for the real classic sound.
    This wasn’t necessary because the ceramics were pretty cool, but I had a desire.
    The stock pots and wiring weren’t great though. The pots didn’t work that well. They were all kind of either ON of OFF. Not much inbetween.
    The caps on the tone switch were pretty unusable to me as well.

    All modifications aside, I love this guitar. The body is perfect, and the neck feels great.

    Oh, and mine had a ratty space control bridge that had to go.
    If this Country Classic has a bar, you’re in real good shape in that department.
     
    ZackyDog and Sonny Strimple like this.
  2. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck I Bleed Orange

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    I'm in the minority maybe who think that things like what kind of bridge or tremolo a guitar has makes little difference. It's all about pickups. After that, does it suit your needs? If you like it, buy it.
     
    thunder58 likes this.
  3. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Bridges are easily changed. It can be done in minutes, on an archtop.

    One thing I’ve seen, in many fields, is the tendency to seek esoterica in simple things. Bridges and intonation are very simple, if you think about what is involved. The bridge height affects intonation, in that the higher the action the sharper the intonation. The bridge position is the other big determining factor. Move towards the tailpiece and the intonation becomes more flat, and vice versa. The string gauge is another factor. The thicker the string core, the sharper it will intonate. In my experience, going between 10s and 11s has never made enough difference in intonation to require a bridge adjustment.

    I always set the height first, and in most cases, I take it down to the point where I’m getting feet buzz, then bring it up slightly. Play a few scales to cover every fret and if there’s no buzz, I for one, am happy.

    Then I tune all six strings and check it by ear, for a rough idea of where the intonation is at, using a 12th fret harmonic against a note fretted at the 12th fret. This is how I do most of the adjustment. Your ear can get intonation very close and with practice you can probably get it perfect, with just your ear.

    Then I check it by tuning it perfectly with a high quality tuner and I measure pitch of the open string and compare it to the pitch at the 12th fret, being careful not to put any side thrust on the strings. If it’s off, I adjust the bridge position accordingly, retune and do it again. By the second go ‘round I usually have it where I want it.

    That whole process takes 2-3 minutes, once you’ve done it a few times. It’s that simple. You will never have perfect intonation with a guitar. You can use a strobe tuner and get everything perfect to the nth degree, but when you play, you are outing side thrust on the strings and it varies from note to note, so you will never be able to have perfect intonation in real-world playing. Get it as close reasonably as possible, and that’s probably all you need.
     
    Groutsch likes this.
  4. Wjensen

    Wjensen Gretschie

    239
    May 25, 2019
    Raleigh, NC
    Welcome to the forum Karhic, and good luck with your quest.
     
  5. Wjensen

    Wjensen Gretschie

    239
    May 25, 2019
    Raleigh, NC
    +1
     
  6. karhik

    karhik Electromatic

    10
    Sep 11, 2020
    Florida
    As far as the pad on the back goes, are they just snaps holding it on? Is taking both pads off to look inside a... snap? (sorry)

    Is changing the pickups or electronics easy on these, or would it be a pain like on a 335?

    Thanks for the help everyone. I guess guitars are always at least some % an emotional decision because most of us could get by with a lot less than we actually have.

    Still, I'm really itching for one of these and I love the gritty to low/med overdrive tones :)
     
    calebaaron666 likes this.
  7. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Changing pickups should be a breeze with that back panel.
     
  8. Dana Rudd

    Dana Rudd Synchromatic

    582
    Nov 26, 2019
    Greybull, WY
    Welcome to G-T. Good luck in your quest.
     
  9. JC higgy

    JC higgy Friend of Fred

    Age:
    49
    Jun 6, 2008
    Belfast Norn Iron
    Just snap the back pad off then take off the panel.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Groutsch

    Groutsch Gretschie

    351
    Jun 9, 2018
    Maryland, US
    Thanks, JC. As I told my wife on our wedding night, I always wondered what that looked like!
     
  11. JC higgy

    JC higgy Friend of Fred

    Age:
    49
    Jun 6, 2008
    Belfast Norn Iron
  12. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    That is a killer guitar, i wouldn't change a thing. I like ceramic filters alot.
     
    calebaaron666 likes this.
  13. karhik

    karhik Electromatic

    10
    Sep 11, 2020
    Florida
    Thank you so much! I was looking for a photo of what things looked like under that pad.

    I might get feisty and rewire the whole thing someday, if I can find schematics and switches and such that would match the hardware. And if I could find gold 'trons that were aged slightly to match... hmmm...
     
    JC higgy and drmilktruck like this.
  14. karhik

    karhik Electromatic

    10
    Sep 11, 2020
    Florida
    Based on others' comments, I'm expecting I might like them better too. I have a strat for the absolutely-must-be-totally-clean situations, but I love the edge of breakup sound my friend gets from what I presume are his ceramic filters
     
  15. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck I Bleed Orange

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    While I wouldn't want a big pad on the back of every guitar, it certainly makes working on the innards a lot easier!
     
    JC higgy likes this.
  16. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    72
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    Welcome to the forum, karhik!
    welcome mat 120.jpg
     
    karhik likes this.
  17. karhik

    karhik Electromatic

    10
    Sep 11, 2020
    Florida
    Hi there, I went to see the guitar at the shop again today and they offered to put fresh strings on it since I noticed they were a little old. I noticed the nut is not attached on this guitar, if you slacken the strings it falls right out. Is that a gretsch thing?
     
  18. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Not really. That sounds more like a nut not being glued down thing. :)
     
    Groutsch likes this.
  19. karhik

    karhik Electromatic

    10
    Sep 11, 2020
    Florida
    Is that standard for a country gent or a gretsch, for the nut not to be glued on, just as the bridge is not actually attached to anything? I know on some classical guitars it is, but I did not know if Gretsch or the CGs would have this.
     
  20. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    All of my Gretsch came with nuts that were glued in place.
     
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