Best base to learn as foundation for rockabilly?

Discussion in 'Gretsch-Talk Music' started by Viking Power, Jan 14, 2021.

  1. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    To all y’all telling me to throw grease on my head and grow a pompadour....

    Joke’s on you since my hair is damn near gone on top. :p
     
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  2. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    I think I need to bite the bullet and focus as well. I think this is a big issue for me in our modern world of having TOO many options. I bounce around a lot and therefore I have learned some stuff but am all over the place and have not focused in and really solidified any of the skills I want.
    I’m still pondering my next move. I’ll keep you posted.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  3. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    I do like Randy’s stuff. I have the beginner rockabilly course on Udemy and have worked through some of it. I’ll give some thought to hunkering down and really working through it. Haven’t seen his Travis picking course yet. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
  4. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    I’ll download and have a listen. Thanks.
     
  5. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    Haha. Thought about this when I posted with that title. I played slap bass for a year myself. Still have a love for it just found it not a lot of fun to play/practice on my own at home. So fun in a band setting though!
     
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  6. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    Just want to give a big shout to this forum for all the advice (and a few laughs too!).
    It’s great to have a place to go to air frustrations and get advice from people that have probably been there and have broken through to the other side.

    Right now I’m thinking that my biggest problem other than a disabled fretting index finger is a lack of consistent effort in a focused direction. I have tended to jump around when things get hard mostly because time is ALWAYS short. Spending my half hour of practice a day on building rhythm in bass note plucking for hybrid or Travis picking frustrates me and I find myself either looking for the “magic” lesson series online OR looking for the alternative skill lesson that will still have me playing guitar but is more instantly gratifying. Like say, learning a new 12 bar blues shuffle variation. Not exactly what I want to learn but still cool and still guitar.

    I guess I’m continuing to air my grievances! Bet you thought Festivus was over (10 points to whoever get the reference).
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  7. Shock

    Shock Gretschie

    210
    Sep 7, 2020
    Minnesota
    I can't say what is right for everyone. That would depend on where you are at today in your playing. Learning the standards is a great way. And a little unavoidable if you intend to play with others. So while maybe a guitar player never actually studied Johnny B Goode, he would be able to jam it with others. If you are going to sit in with some fellas, it could likely come up. If not that song specifically, something that is similar enough.

    I would say pick a musician that you are aspiring to, and learn how they do it. How you get there is going to happen in many small steps. All musicians steal riffs from each other. And we all recycle the same chords, just into different songs. Once you get into it, you will find there isn't a whole lot of difference in the majority of Chuck's material. Roll Over Beethoven, It Wasn't Me, etc, etc. Maybe in a different key, maybe a little different chord pattern, maybe a little different right hand technique. But Johnny B Goode is a song that I would say every rockabilly guitar player would know, even if they don't actually "know it."
     
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  8. michelb

    michelb Synchromatic

    Age:
    30
    736
    Mar 27, 2020
    Belgium
    Rockabilly covers a pretty wide range of music. It's hot rodded, blues, swing, jazz, country.

    My personal approach has been:
    - Get to know the chord progressions and some rythm licks.
    - get into Travis picking and banjo rolls
    - mix rythm lick with fingerpicking
    - create a lick library for lead/solo
    - I personally like Adrian Whyte 's lessons better
    - Also got Darrel Higham's book on rockabilly licks and techniques
     
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  9. michelb

    michelb Synchromatic

    Age:
    30
    736
    Mar 27, 2020
    Belgium
    Then get a paperboy cap or a 50s Harley hat :D
     
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  10. wildeman

    wildeman I Bleed Orange

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    Study Merle Travis and......Lightning Hopkins. S'sall you need.

     
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  11. lathoto

    lathoto Synchromatic

    656
    Apr 23, 2020
    Ohio
    At some point a Hillbilly got his hands on an electric guitar and sped up a country song. After the war ended many came North to find work. Country, blues, and gospel feed the genre to this day. If you want your style to develop naturally don't copy anything. Learning how to arrange a song is paramount.
     
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  12. El Marin

    El Marin Gretschie

    Well I only do it when gigging. Is not only about a quiff... don't forget your creepers. I use theese:

    [​IMG]


    But actually YES, image and attitude are important too when playing rockabilly
     
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  13. Viking Power

    Viking Power Gretschie

    492
    Jun 11, 2018
    Mountlake Terrace, WA
    I’ve actually always wanted a pair of creepers. Haha.

    Hey man, checked out your band’s YouTube channel. I dig your stuff. Nice cover of “Beat on the Brat”. Lots of other good tunes as well. Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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  14. slickfaster

    slickfaster Country Gent

    Dec 29, 2009
    USA
    Then there is only one thing left to do...
    Go Blue Cap! 95CD315D-89CE-4EA5-8EA0-AF3808CD7677.jpeg
     
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  15. Downsman

    Downsman Electromatic

    10
    Dec 9, 2020
    East Sussex
    I'm aiming at learning the same stuff you are. I've downloaded the Jason Loughlin courses and started on the Rhythm one. Then I thought I needed a better grounding in fingerstyle for the Travis picking etc. Trying to run before I could walk. So now I'm working through Muriel Anderson's 123 Fingerstyle course on Truefire. It's been great so far. It isn't Rockabilly, but in evolution terms I suspect this is what the early Rockabilly players grew up with and learned to do first. I'll still break off and play some surf, or Johnny Cash, try a few 50s Scotty Moore licks, work on Mystery Train etc, as I do have attention span issues, but I'm hoping to keep going with this course right to the end as I think it's going to make a real difference to my playing. Then dive into Jason's course again.
     
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  16. Stratiner

    Stratiner Electromatic

    Redd Volkaert on TF also has some good lessons - when I was searching for rockabilly, he came up. If you are not fast enough to get them, use the speed thinger to slow it down. I'm still pretty slow on his chicken picking lessons. Learn what he's doing and how, get that clean and then move up. Same with any of the TF lessons. There is no true Rockabilly path on TF, but I'm sure there are plenty of things on there with all access to keep you busy. I know I am. And can swap around as the mood strikes.
     
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  17. Stratiner

    Stratiner Electromatic

    Also - https://www.amazon.com/Brian-Setzer...ocphy=9009549&hvtargid=pla-474837714928&psc=1

    That has the tabs so you know WHERE to play a part. It won't help your speed, but will give you a base for the notes. Mine came with CD that has gone missing over the years. I would have to buy a CD player at this point as well. I bought the book to learn Sleepwalk before there were so many vids on YouTube, but there are a lot of good things in there.
     
  18. Slighter

    Slighter Electromatic

    17
    Dec 5, 2019
    Chicago
    https://www.jamplay.com/guitar-lessons/genres/9-rock/285 -- It took a few years of begging but I think Jamplay and Stu Ziff really came through on this course. (JP offers sales on their annual rate multiple times per year - even more so now they have partnered up with TrueFire.) One great feature of JP is their live Q&A chats - two hour blocks of interactive video - you can cam up with your webcam and get instant feedback on any topic - with many of the recorded lesson instructors, including Mr Ziff on Mon & Thurs weekly. Times are US based though. This is not a pitch - I have been a member there for 6+ years and was one of the squeaky wheels nagging them for this course.
    I also have all the Rbilly TF courses, Sokolow's Rockabilly Guitar book, Mr Higham's 100 Rbilly Riffs, Two of My Twangy Guitar courses and a great video with tab that is out of print, hard to find - Rockabilly with Paul Pigat. Along with a ton of related youtubes including tossing Adrian from anyonecanplayguitar a pint a month on patreon. No I don't obsess..... much.
     
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  19. bigjohnbates

    bigjohnbates Gretschie

    150
    Jun 15, 2011
    Vancouver
    Look up Paul Pigat / Cousin Harley. He's a good as it gets on rockabilly guitar and his lessons are also.
     
  20. David_GS

    David_GS Electromatic

    58
    Oct 16, 2020
    Toronto
    I am bookmarking this thread for future reference as there are some great tips in here. I'm a lifelong rhythm player and my classical fingerpicking skills are decent but when I got my Gretsch late last year I decided I wanted to learn more rockabilly too. I bought Damian Bacci's course as I liked his videos, but they're at the same level of difficulty although they're slowed right down so you can get everything down. I recently found this channel and band and thought this video was great, pretty simple and gave you enough variation to fake it:



    I'm working on this one of Bacci's, I can play at a tempo halfway between full speed and the example:



    I liked this one too:

     
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