Are Gretsches Doomed to the Dustbin of History?

DougCraft

Gretschie
Apr 24, 2018
219
Northern Colorado
I do not think so - I think there will always be a core baseline of enthusiasists who will love the vintage vibe these wonderful guitars offer. I also think Gretsches and shredder guitars share the same physical benefit of having very low action and ease of playing that will never go out of style.

At the same time, I note that there are no Rudolph Valentino fan clubs any more, and even Elvis is becoming a novelty curiosity to younger players as the march of time grinds on. Kandinsky said, "Every work of art is a child of its time." Over the long haul, are Gretsches doomed to fade into history along with mandolin orchestras and harp guitars?

What do you think, fellow Gretsch lovers? Will there be Gretsch lover forums in 2050?
 

montereyjack66

Country Gent
Feb 29, 2012
3,248
LA-ish
As technology accelerates, with ever tighter circles of fashion, including music, it's not hard to imagine that the commitment it takes to master any instrument seems likely to wither. I'm reminded of the Gene Autry museum. Lot's of uber cool cowboy guitars but you don't see them selling at Walmart or on Amazon Prime. On the other hand, Elvis showed up to save us from the 50's and the Clash showed up to save us from the 70's. If there's not a reaction to societal forces somewhere in the future, then maybe when electricity goes plop, the guy standing in the corner with a hollowbody Gretsch may suddenly become a force to be reckoned with...as long as he can find strings.
 
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Mr. Lumbergh

Country Gent
May 14, 2013
1,592
Initech, Inc.
On the other hand, Elvis showed up to save us from the 50's and the Clash showed up to save us from the 70's.
And Grunge showed up to save us from the 80's. It always ticks back and forth like a pendulum, and I think guitar-driven music is going to come back when folks get sick of pop/synth stuff, just like it did in the late 70's, late 80's, mid 00's... While I think there is some validity to the idea that attention spans aren't what they used to me (mine included), I also think a lot of folks just have less time; too many people have to have more than one job to get by, or are in school to retrain themselves, trying to raise kids, etc. Those that really want to do it though will find a way to make it happen, folks find time for what's important to them.
 

Dreamtime

Gretschie
Dec 14, 2017
294
New York
Yes, Gretsch guitars are doomed to the dustbin of history.

As you pointed out even Elvis is steadily moving into the realm of a curiosity, a novelty. Fading away. Same can be said of all the great musical artists of past generations. Al Jolson, Johann Strauss, Cab Calloway, The Andrew Sisters, Stephen Foster...titans of their time....now a "Who's that?"

Shakespeare, Milton, Hemingway, Poe, Stephen King, Melville...will always stay relevant. Literature is different because it is simply words and words span time. Music does not. The very nature of popular music changes in a very short span of time. Hell, even music from 1998 seems dated and stale to us now. Gretsches -- and most brands of guitars -- will be relics and forgotten in the coming years.
 

panhead6zero

Country Gent
Jan 17, 2015
1,112
The Motor City
I've had similar discussions with guys about the vintage car hobby. Hagerty insurance covers vintage cars and has a quarterly magazine. They mentioned a lot of Young folks showing interest in the car hobby. Who knows Setzer brought swing music back...
 

Dreamtime

Gretschie
Dec 14, 2017
294
New York
..Hagerty insurance covers vintage cars and has a quarterly magazine. They mentioned a lot of Young folks showing interest in the car hobby...
Vintage car market is kind of dead, too. When I bought my old Mustangs the buyers of those cars were real car guys. Guys who just wanted a nice looking old car to work on and fix up and cruise around in. Hell, I bought a '68 for $1,800 back in the mid '80s and the car was in very decent shape.

But then something happened. Those prices really jumped. You couldn't get near a decent muscle car for anything under $10,000. It was the young people - yuppies - who were buying classic cars not to work on them, but just to flaunt them. The yuppies destroyed the vintage car market.
 

Uncle Daddy

Friend of Fred
Jan 19, 2012
5,923
Maldon UK
Here the "classic" car and motorcycle market has been destroyed by ultra low returns on savings. Plenty of folk have been buying stuff with a hope that it goes up in value.
 


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