Aqua-Puss vs Carbon Copy vs Echoplex

Favorite delay pedal for slapback

  • Aqua-Puss

    Votes: 2 6.9%
  • Carbon Copy

    Votes: 9 31.0%
  • Echoplex

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • None o' those! (other)

    Votes: 15 51.7%

  • Total voters
    29

Bertotti

Gretschified
Jul 20, 2017
10,176
South Dakota
I’m a source audio fan boy and have been eyeing this one or the collider which is delay and reverb or using the app two delay or reverb. I think.

 

Byron

Country Gent
Sep 4, 2009
1,251
uk
So many cheap pedals around if you just want slapback. My grab n go at the moment is the Tone City Tape Machine. Small, does one thing good. Like the Dano fab echo, Mooer reecho, Nux, loads of em. But the preamp combination is a different matter and the Mystery Brain seems to be king. Milkman sounds interesting.....and I dunno why Dunlop don't combine their Echoplex delay and preamp into one pedal. Of course, the Belle Epoch does that, temptingly!
 

aleceiffel

Electromatic
Sep 3, 2022
68
Queens, NY
So many cheap pedals around if you just want slapback. My grab n go at the moment is the Tone City Tape Machine. Small, does one thing good. Like the Dano fab echo, Mooer reecho, Nux, loads of em. But the preamp combination is a different matter and the Mystery Brain seems to be king. Milkman sounds interesting.....and I dunno why Dunlop don't combine their Echoplex delay and preamp into one pedal. Of course, the Belle Epoch does that, temptingly!
Another hopefully not too dumb question: why are preamps always paired w/ delay pedals?
 

bendercaster

Electromatic
Sep 3, 2022
21
Sacramento, CA
Another hopefully not too dumb question: why are preamps always paired w/ delay pedals?
It goes back to real tape echo machines. Some people found they liked what it did to their signal even if they weren't using it as a delay. There was just something about the preamp in those tape echo units that was very musical and pleasing on it's own. Pedals that try to emulate that tape echo sound often have a preamp that mimics the preamp from a tape echo.
 

stevo

Friend of Fred
May 1, 2012
7,308
Atlanta
Yep, agreed, although I haven't played in front of an audience for almost a decade, so I have higher expectations and can tell the difference 😁
So can I for the same reasons. So I do tend to care how it sounds - and I like grainy dirty repeats for most delay although I have a Flashback that does the pristine stuff when needed.
 

Henry

I Bleed Orange
Apr 9, 2014
19,222
Petaluma
Another hopefully not too dumb question: why are preamps always paired w/ delay pedals?
Adding anything to the signal path will erode or degrade the signal - even just a long guitar chord will do that - a preamp can add that back kind and serve as a buffer. A delay is of course adding a signal that never existed so it must use some sort of pre/amp to create the sound. As you've noted, analog delays can lose a bit of the highs (analog delays have their own sound, that's why people want them). I've heard that DMMs are notable for being brighter but also noisier than other analog delays because the preamp adds back highs and in the process also amplifies any noise.

I am no tech guhru, this is just info I've absorber over time! Hopefully it is mostly accurate. ;)
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,700
Tucson
Another hopefully not too dumb question: why are preamps always paired w/ delay pedals?
Virtually every pedal has, at the very least, a unity-gain preamp in it. Signals require careful handling, to get from your guitar, to your amp. A signal leaving a device should be low impedance, and when the signal enters a device, that device should be high impedance. This minimizes loss.

The functional portion of a pedal, which actually modifies the signal, is going to extract a price, so most pedals have a recovery stage of some sort, which might just be a single transistor, or an Op-Amp, to send the signal out of the pedal at low impedance and at a level at least equal to what was fed to the input of that pedal.

One of my favorite pedals is a Stanley FX Blue Nebula, which emulates all sorts of delays. The signal path uses four discreet JFETs as a preamp, with the goal of making the signal a bit more rich in harmonic overtones. Then, the signal goes to an Op-Amp, a simple, relatively neutral, preamp, which sends the signal to the DSP (Digital Signal Processor) at an appropriate level. The DSP actually emulates the various delays, reverbs, or even chorus, in the pedal, and then the signal passes through another Op-Amp on the way out.

Most pedals have the Op-Amps pre and post. An overdrive pedal will usually have an Op-Amp at the front end to buffer the signal, another Op-Amp to create a lot of gain for the OD stage, and an Op-Amp to buffer the signal to the output. If a pedal has a volume or “level” control, there’s a preamp.
 

aleceiffel

Electromatic
Sep 3, 2022
68
Queens, NY
Well, I've now had some time with each of the following. Some notes, my thoughts on each: (can't figure out the formatting for an unordered list..)
* Way Huge Aqua-Puss -- great, targeted pedal, does one thing and does it well. Probably has the best analog sound of the three -- probably best-looking too, if that matters ;)
* Boss DD-8 -- very versatile, from crystal clean repeats to darker delay modeling, and plenty of tricks up its sleeve. I can't tell if it's because it's buffered bypass, but if I listen real close, this appears to be the cleanest/brightest/least-treble-rolled-off of the pedals by default, in the "Standard", or whatever it's called, setting, ever so slightly. Bonus: looper functionality
* TC Electronic Flashback 2 -- very similar to the DD-8, essentially offers comparable tricks in its bag, plus something called "MASH", which is..when you *mash* the pedal, you get an effect, custom to the delay setting, that scales with the pressure applied to the pedal. Bonus: also looper.

Both the digis offer analog and tape modeling, and versions each of more modulated delays, reverb delays w/ octave effects, etc. The footswitch on the Flashback is a bit odd, no real click to engage the pedal -- haven't had any real issues with that, might just take some getting used-to. The *mash* functionality may have been better served by a Boss-style footswitch. A fast tap de/activates the pedal, and applying subtle pressure activates the *mash*.

The Flashback might actually be the most full-featured of the pedals. I'm wondering though how much time I would actually spend goofing off in the other modes, or, necessity being the mother of invention, I'd be better served going with something like the more bare-bones DD-3T. Actually that one does appear to have greater travel accuracy in the delay time knob -- it's actually kinda hard to dial in slapback on the others -- you can easily over/undershoot.
 

Synchro

The artist formerly known as: Synchro
Staff member
Jun 2, 2008
26,700
Tucson
You can probably score one on the used market, for a reasonable price.
 

delbomber

Electromatic
Jun 1, 2022
21
Felton, CA
I couldn't vibe with my carbon copy. Too dark. I tried a bunch of other "full feature" delays and none of them gave me the slapback I wanted. I wound up with the JHS The Milkman Slapback and haven't looked back. Super simple, does exactly what I want it to do, and sounds amazing.
 

thesingleboil

Electromatic
Nov 29, 2021
5
Boston
Well, I've now had some time with each of the following. Some notes, my thoughts on each: (can't figure out the formatting for an unordered list..)
* Way Huge Aqua-Puss -- great, targeted pedal, does one thing and does it well. Probably has the best analog sound of the three -- probably best-looking too, if that matters ;)
* Boss DD-8 -- very versatile, from crystal clean repeats to darker delay modeling, and plenty of tricks up its sleeve. I can't tell if it's because it's buffered bypass, but if I listen real close, this appears to be the cleanest/brightest/least-treble-rolled-off of the pedals by default, in the "Standard", or whatever it's called, setting, ever so slightly. Bonus: looper functionality
* TC Electronic Flashback 2 -- very similar to the DD-8, essentially offers comparable tricks in its bag, plus something called "MASH", which is..when you *mash* the pedal, you get an effect, custom to the delay setting, that scales with the pressure applied to the pedal. Bonus: also looper.

Both the digis offer analog and tape modeling, and versions each of more modulated delays, reverb delays w/ octave effects, etc. The footswitch on the Flashback is a bit odd, no real click to engage the pedal -- haven't had any real issues with that, might just take some getting used-to. The *mash* functionality may have been better served by a Boss-style footswitch. A fast tap de/activates the pedal, and applying subtle pressure activates the *mash*.

The Flashback might actually be the most full-featured of the pedals. I'm wondering though how much time I would actually spend goofing off in the other modes, or, necessity being the mother of invention, I'd be better served going with something like the more bare-bones DD-3T. Actually that one does appear to have greater travel accuracy in the delay time knob -- it's actually kinda hard to dial in slapback on the others -- you can easily over/undershoot.
It was in this moment that you realized you need two delay pedals. I'd get the Aqua-puss or Strymon Deco for slap/modulation and then a more flexible delay like the flashback or boss for all else.
 

EarleG

Electromatic
Dec 19, 2013
54
Hendersonville TN
The Carbon Copy Mini has the bright switch on the side. I use their original standard one as like the softer delay notes.
I have a DigiTech Obscura that does the brighter repeats plus other stuff but mainly go with the CC for it simplicity.

 

eric.chambers

Electromatic
Mar 17, 2014
29
PA
Any old delay will give you an adequate slap back. If you want the most authentic Echoplex sounds without buying an actual tape delay unit, the Belle Epoch deluxe is as close as you're gonna get.
 


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