A Lesson in Marketing

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Duo Slinger, Mar 5, 2021.

  1. stevo

    stevo Friend of Fred

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    Same here and same here. Mine wasn't a rescue, but she's a covid dog.
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  2. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    Well cheers to you. That dog is keeping me semi-sane, or at least functional.
     
    stevo likes this.
  3. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    10% inspiration, 90% perspiration. :)
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  4. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    Don't forget the GAS and consternation
     
  5. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck I Bleed Orange

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    Bonamassa! ;)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Those go above the 100% line. :)

    That had occurred to me, as well.
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  7. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    Screen Shot 2021-03-08 at 2.57.47 PM.png ...notice anything about the audience?
     
    Henry and MotorCentaur like this.
  8. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    They're all Coloradans? :)

    That is a problem I have no ideas for. The lack of a young audience is troubling, but I don't think that is a matter of promotion. Our world has changed drastically.
     
    MotorCentaur and Duo Slinger like this.
  9. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    I don't have the answer either. But Bonamassa isn't the answer. Someone will come along, someday, maybe.
     
  10. Stefan87

    Stefan87 Country Gent

    May 20, 2019
    Brisbane, Australia
    I agree with a lot that has been said, I'm 33, I grew up listening to country music through my parents but when I started listening to my own taste of music it was early 2000's and that was the wave of the pop punk era where the likes of Greenday, Blink 182, Jimmy eat world, The Offspring, Grinspoon, Powderfinger, Foo Fighters etc where heavily plastered on the hit radio stations as it wasn't heavy enough to be classed as rock and tame enough to be considered as pop.

    When I was in school and my friends where talking about guitars there were only 3 brands that were the ones to have Fender, Gibson and Ibanez, because that was what most of the popular guys played, but when you looked at what every one purchased it was squiers/fenders, ibanez and epiphones or Gibson copies but no one at that time at my age played actual Gibsons, why... because they were purely too expensive and there were better options out there for less money, so no one I knew bought one and if it wasn't for the money aspect it was because they weren't comfortable to play.

    IMO Gibson don't need a player to endorse or anything like because I could guarantee that if you looked at any popular musicians gear there will be a Gibson there, no rock band doesn't have a LP or an SG in the racks, no big name Jazz/Blues player doesn't have a Gibson, even country guys play Les Pauls, the guitars are out there in the hands of popular musicians, the problem is they are not in the hands of the beginner guitarist because like many have mentioned before that market isn't what they are aiming for and there is not an 'entry level' Gibson that doesn't cost a small fortune (not including epiphone in this) and with the quality of cheaper guitars now days, why would you buy one when there are better cheaper options out there.

    Me personally I respect the brand for what they are but will never own one, I don't like their style, I don't like their playability, I don't find them comfortable and I don't like the price tag, there is nothing that Gibson do to make me want to buy one (LP special was very close though) or even accept one as a gift but I will say that their PAF/P90 sound is something that truely is wonderful to listen to.

    This is such a good point when you think about it, realistically it's the person who is in the public eye that decides what they are going to put their name too, any honorable person wouldn't back a product they didn't believe in, I know if I was famous and Gibson wanted to back me I would be saying no.
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  11. Gretschmen65

    Gretschmen65 Country Gent

    May 20, 2016
    QLD Australia
    Obviously, Australia.
    However, Australia is pretty much just a smaller version of California (2/3 the population) when it comes to Bike preferences and marketing.
    Very similar. My daughter lives in LA and has for 20 years or more and I'm reasonably familiar with the bike scene there as well.YMMV
     
  12. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    Huh. Well, I was thinking about American sales numbers, but that's a good point.
     
    Gretschmen65 likes this.
  13. Kitvin713

    Kitvin713 Gretschie

    303
    Jan 10, 2017
    Fresno, CA, U.S.A.
    This thread got me thinking many deep thoughts about why I picked the guitars I did. When I was a kid I wanted a strat because the guy at church played a G&L legacy. (I didn’t know that it wasn’t a strat technically) but my first guitar was an parlor acoustic. First electric was a squier strat pack, my parents couldn’t afford a more expensive guitar. (Not complaining, just noting that) but after that every guitar I bought has been because it suited me as a player. That’s more what I see from people these days. The musicians who are out there don’t buy what there “hero’s” played because there aren’t really anymore guitar hero’s. Additionally most young folk like myself will do an insane amount of internet research on what to buy before we start anything. I can almost guarantee that anyone wanting to get into music does so with a search of “what guitar is best for a beginner” then they read an article that says buy what feels best to play, and you like the look of.

    what does this have to do with Gibson? They need to make a players guitar. One that is just a good instrument. That’s why I love my Taylor - it’s frustratingly perfect no character. But it plays perfect and sounds perfect. That’s why I love my gretsch - it doesn’t fight me and I don’t stress about anything on it. Just sounds good and plays good.
    I have always wanted a 335, but I won’t buy one from Gibson. Because I know I might be disappointed. They did that to themselves, they put to much hype behind instruments that aren’t “players instruments”
    I don’t feel that way about any other brand.
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  14. juks

    juks Gretschie

    220
    Nov 26, 2020
    Fremont, California
    This was an interesting string of messages to read. Can't put all my thoughts here but couple of things.

    I started playing latter part of 70s. So punk Era, that blew my mind. I had an maya guitar that was awful. Then our bass player left so I got an Aria bass but was lucky enough to find a deal on used Rickenbacker 4001. IMO back then most the good stuff was either US or UK made. And I'm from Finland so no nationalistic thoughts there. These days there are so many brands putting out great stuff from overseas. If back then there was this much choise would I have invested in a Rick (and a Vox AC50)? Probably not considering how big hole that put in my student budget.

    So that's a really tough one for Gibson. I think we are over due for complete explosion in music industry, like what punk did and Nirvana did. Not sure if it can happen anymore but that would bring in new blood to the industry and could give gibson and others opportunities. I can't think of last time I heard a new band that was exiting. My son was playing me stuff in the car and I had only heard one of the bands. All I could say was they sound like Cure, they sound like 80 futuristic bands etc. Nothing new. We need a music revolution!

    Lastly, where my interest started from and what the gear industry was like, I always think that the stuff manufactured in the home country of the brand should be the best stuff. Ex bought a Mexico made VW golf when we moved to the US and that was nothing but problems. I will never buy a German car that isn't made in Germany.

    I realize that I'm old and world has changed. But with that mindset Gibson US made guitars should be the best stuff. But they need to address the whole market as there is so much cheaper good quality choise. I don't think they are fully utilizing Epi for that.
     
    Duo Slinger likes this.
  15. Henry

    Henry I Bleed Orange

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Well, he plays old music for old people. If you want young people to show up then you play the music they listen to.

    This article has limited access to some statistics: https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/electric-guitars-market

    A couple notable things.

    First, live music was not dying:

    As per a report titled, ‘The Guardian’, in July 2017, the music industry of the U.K. witnessed a rise of 12% in the audiences at live music events from 2015 to 2016. The same post reported that the number of audiences has increased by 2.2 million people and reached a 30.9 million audience, up from 27.7 million audiences in 2015. Also, these music events added approximately USD 4 billion to the country’s economy. These trends in the music industry are projected to expand the scope of electric guitars over the forecast period.

    Electric guitar revenue in the US has grown and is expected to continue to grow. This was published pre-COVID in 2019, so presumably 2020 shows a bigger bump.
    [​IMG]


    One thing that has changed generationally is that newer generations are more interested in experience than stuff. They may be more likely to go to a music event, than, say, buy their 12th strat. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA

    Heh yeah... which leads to interesting results. Fyre festival comes to mind.
     
    MotorCentaur and Henry like this.
  17. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    That’s interesting.

    I like the illustration of a half full toothpaste tube. You can spread the toothpaste evenly over the length of the tube, concentrate it on one end or that other, or any permutation of the possibilities of distributing the volume through the space available, but the amount of toothpaste remains the same.

    So, the volume of public interest in music could be distributed quite differently than it was in the days when there were but a handful of international stars serving in the role of guitar hero.

    So, Bonamassa has his following and there are countless other artists that do, as well. These may be more accessible than the superstars of the past, and that accessibility may actually expand the number of people that are willing to spend money to see an act in a live performance. I think that it’s tricky to gauge, because our ways of measuring are still geared to the old model.
     
    davetrux, Duo Slinger and Henry like this.
  18. Duo Slinger

    Duo Slinger Synchromatic

    545
    Sep 11, 2020
    California, USA
    Yeah, definitely. Music and arts and celebrity has become more personalized, if that makes any sense.
     
  19. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    You did a much better job of stating my point than I did. There are still guitar heroes, in fact more than ever, but these days everyone has a much greater array of heroes to choose from, so there are a greater number of heroes, each commanding a smaller following.

    I don’t see that ever changing.
     
    Rmccamey and Duo Slinger like this.
  20. afire

    afire Country Gent

    I don't know what the answer is for Gibson (or if they even need one), but I'll say that offshoring production to Japan a la Gretsch definitely isn't it. Wages in Japan are about what they are here, so you're not really saving money, and the prices of Gretsch guitars reflect that. A Les Paul Standard runs $2,499.00. The nearest Gretsch would be the Player's Edition 6228, and that runs $2,599.00. And I'll say, I've never had an issue with Gibson QC. Every time I've ever picked one up at a shop, it's been a very nice guitar. Same with the handful I've owned. Unless moving to Japan would result in a drastic drop in prices, there's no way that minor savings would offset the loss of one of their bigger assets - the fact that they are made in the U.S.A.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.