5622 vs 6122TPE for fingerpicking?

Discussion in 'THE Gretsch Discussion Forum' started by rschultz, Jul 18, 2021.

  1. rschultz

    rschultz Electromatic

    60
    May 11, 2015
    Knoxville, TN
    I’ve got a 6122TPE country gentleman, with Bigsby, FilterTrons and 25.5” scale.

    I’m looking to pick up a used 5622, V-stoptail (no Bigsby), BroadTrons, center block and 24.6” scale.

    Which one would have better clarity for fingerpicking?
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2021
    Andrew Griffin likes this.
  2. AllenK

    AllenK Gretschie

    Unless you are particularly drawn to the BT Broadtron sound in that 5622, your 6122 PE should be more than sufficient.
     
  3. rschultz

    rschultz Electromatic

    60
    May 11, 2015
    Knoxville, TN
    Yeah it should. I struggle to get good clean tone, and the G-string always seems to sound funky. I just swapped the rocker bar bridge for a roller adjustomatic. Intonation is spot on now, but the G-string funkiness still is there. Do I want more neck pickup, generally speaking?

    So you don't think the center block would help stabilize the tone any?
     
  4. Jerzey Bob

    Jerzey Bob Gretschie

    417
    Apr 3, 2021
    North Jersey
    From what I've read, & my limited personal experience, G/3rd strings can be finicky on a few different makes of guitars. Most often graphiting the nut w/ a pencil, or carefully rubbing the nut slot w/ some very fine emery cloth should help. There's also a specific lube made for this.
     
  5. Andrew Griffin

    Andrew Griffin Synchromatic

    742
    Oct 22, 2015
    When I think about fingerpicking, I tend to think more about the necks. I like the New Yorker and the resonators for that, but I live for the day when I can get one of the COuntry Gent single cuts with a 1.75 width at the nut.
     
  6. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    That 6122 is a natural at fingerstyle, IMHO. The brightness of the Filtertrons is a perfect match for that sort of playing.

    Third strings are a pain in the neck. If I never had to bend, I’d use a wound string, but I do bend the third string a lot, so that probably would not work. You might experiment with string gauges and see if you can find a compromise that intonates well and sounds right.

    On my Gent, I use a hybrid string set of .050”, .037”, .027”, .017”, .013” and .010”, with the lower three strings being Thomastik Jazz Swing flatwounds, and the uppers being D’Addario plain steel singles. I get pretty good balance with these, but there is almost always at least a tiny bit of a sonic difference between the 4th and 3rd strings.
     
    Jerzey Bob likes this.
  7. rschultz

    rschultz Electromatic

    60
    May 11, 2015
    Knoxville, TN
    That's good to know that I'm not the only one who's struggled to figure out the plain G-string. I don't bend, so maybe a wound G would work. How would I find electric guitar strings with a wound G?

    I've been using 11-14-18-28-38-48 (because the specs says so). But I could change.
     
  8. rschultz

    rschultz Electromatic

    60
    May 11, 2015
    Knoxville, TN
  9. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    As long as bending isn’t an issue, I’d say go for it. A lot of makers have sets with a wound G. I know that D’Addarrio appends a “w” to the part number.
     
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