Winter projects a Double Ani. and a 1962 6122 Country Gent.

Discussion in 'Technical Side of Things' started by Flakey, Oct 9, 2015.

  1. Uniblob

    Uniblob Gretschie

    194
    Jun 21, 2015
    Baltimore
    +1 Really enjoying this thread. Beautiful work.
     
  2. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    The body is bound now. It was pretty easy not a lot of drastic curves. The binding required a second or two of heating with a hair dryer set to hot to bend the binding into the waiste and cut out locations of the body. I held the dryer about 8 inches away and moved it back a forth over the area. I ran a bead of acrylic glue into the channel and bend the binding into position. I had several pieces of tape standing by to taping the binding into postion. Sorry I don't have photos of the process but there was no one around to hold the camera. I'll take pictures of the binding process when I do the country gent.

    The binding dimensions are 5 mm x 1.5 mm

    The vertical piece that runs at the neck block between the top and back binding had to be cut from a sheet since the required sizes was wider than the binding strips.

    I cut the piece wider than needed then sanding back o fit flush with the body. i started with 220 grit to remove material quickly and as I got closer to the exact fit finsihed with 320 grit.

    Here is the Anni body with the new binding:

    photo 4.JPG


    You'll notice a little filler along the seams between the binding and wood. As I said earlier I had a little tearout in a couple of places when removing the old binding. Since I'll be painting the body I applied the filler to bring the surface area level. If I was doing a natural finish or dying the wood I would have routed a new channel about a cm deeper than the old channel to make a tight line between the body and binding.
     
    G DynaTron likes this.
  3. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Lets talk about what kind of pickups this guitar will have. After listening to various samples on the T.V Jones website, I decided I'm going with the Hi-LO trons because I like the way the sound and the Gent will have filtertrons anyway. After a nice conversation with Tom, I decide I would use the traditional mount and route out the top to accomidate the pups for a couple of reasons; 1) this guitar is not a restoration and would have little collector value when done. 2) I didn't want to pay the added charge to get the pups made for the vintage style. 3) I may want to install filtertrons later so I photo 3.JPG didn't want to route out the top when the guitar has a new finish.
     
    G DynaTron likes this.
  4. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    As you can see there is no way the old holes will allow mounting of the new pickups so I'll be routing them out.

    photo 2.JPG photo 1.JPG
     
    G DynaTron likes this.
  5. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Well since I have all my binding material out lets get the neck done at the same time. I used the same binding with the same dimensions and will cut it down to size once its installed. Again, I ran a bead of acrylic glue into the channel, applied clamps to the each end of the neck to hold the binding into place while I taped down the remaining edge areas. I did each side for the fret board on different days doing one side then letting the glue dry a day then doing the other side of the fretboard. I had a few clamps that woud work on the neck so I used these as well. It's not like I enjoy taping things up o_O

    binding1.JPG

    binding2.JPG

    I guess it should be said that after I installed the frets I ran a fret leveling file along the binding channel to make the edges of the frets level with the fret board before installing the binding.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
    G DynaTron likes this.
  6. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    Things are lookin good.
     
  7. OldCowHand

    OldCowHand Country Gent

    Sep 24, 2015
    Kent, England.
    Keep 'em coming, things are really taking shape now.
     
  8. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Thanks for the updates.
     
  9. G DynaTron

    G DynaTron Synchromatic

    808
    Dec 7, 2015
    France
    Very interesting, thanks for sharing !
     
  10. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Let’s deal with the pickup issue. As said earlier, I’ll need to route out the pickup holes on the top to accommodate the pickups. The pickups screw into the supporting top braces and will need to have slots cut into them that will allow pickup to drop low enough for the proper distance between the strings and pickups. This will need to be done when the neck is attached, stings mounted and action adjusted because I do not want to remove any more wood than necessary from the bracing. It’s what supports the top after all. So right now I’ll just remove the material from the top itself.

    For a template, I used a pickup ring and mounted it onto the top and trace the hole. I used the old screw holes of left by the old ring and it lined up perfectly. The old pickup holes are still centered.

    Next I measure the thickness of the top and set my Dremel with a router bit just a about a cm more shallow. I used a Dremel router base to hold the Dremel and pulled the router towards me just shaving about a mm at a time. To get the radius close on the corners I run the router from the center of the hole and pull it into the curve . Once one corner is made I then turn off the router, reposition the body so I’m always pulling the router to me and do the same for that corner. Again, pulling the router into the curve then pushing it out and repeating this motion until the curved line is met with the router. Once all four corners are made I then remove the material between the two points of the respective corners always pulling the router towards me.

    You can see the cuts made in the bridge pickup position in the picture showing the cuts that is to the left in this photo.

    photo 1.JPG
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2015
  11. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Now that that most of the material is removed leaving a cm of thickness remaining I'm sure that I didn't cut into the side of the bracing while I remove the unwanted top material. So being that the remaining material is so thin I now apply a little pressure with my finger and the material snaps away leaving a thin rough edge as can be seen in the pickup hole to on the right side of the photo. photo 1.JPG
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2015
  12. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    I traced the guiding lines slightly smaller than the template rings because I wanted to hand fit the pickup’s holes and the pickup’s bases vary between pickup. So to hand fit the pickup cavity and smooth out the edges I use a hand file and after just a few strokes with the file the cavity is clear of unwanted material. I clean up the edge with a couple of strokes with 220 grit sandpaper photo 3.JPG
     
    OldCowHand likes this.
  13. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    And I file the shims I glued into the sloppy neck pocket to tighten the fit when I reattach the neck. photo 4.JPG

    As you can see, the shim only needed to fill in the upper part of the neck pocket,. The neck tenon was tight enough in the lower part of the "V". This will now give me greater surface contact between the neck and body and more gluing surface.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2015
    G DynaTron likes this.
  14. englishman

    englishman Gretschified

    Age:
    62
    Apr 5, 2014
    Detroit
    Great stuff, love it.
     
  15. blc45

    blc45 Country Gent

    Age:
    68
    Aug 23, 2011
    nc
    So cool!! You are the man. I love tracking your progress. Thanks for posting.
     
  16. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    Great thread, Flakey! Love the pics!
     
  17. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    I just know these are gonna turn out cool! Great work man.
     
  18. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    LETS get this thing looking like a guitar again. Its time to paint.

    Now I apologize for not taking pixs through this part but I didn't have a camera for a while but this is what I did.
    When I paint set necks I'll usually glue the neck back on then shoot sealer, primer then the color coat but since I'm using two different colors I shot the neck and body separately. This made taping off and handling the pieces easier as I shot the color coat.

    First: Sealer coat

    The neck and body get three coats (three overlapping passes=1 coat) of vinyl sanding sealer. (Behlens)
    This is done over a three day period with 1 day for each coat with sanding with 320 grit after each coat is dried. This begins to give a nice smooth surface to build the finish. Any flaws like runs or nibs or smaller scratches in the wood will affect anything that follows so its easier to deal with it now then when they "suddenly" appear in the buff out. The sealer will also make it easier to scrape the paint off the binding because the paint is sitting on the sealer and not going into the tiny pores of the binding.


    Second: The primer

    The primer is applied. Now it is possible to paint right on top of the sealer coat and that is what Gretsch and Gibson did back in the day but since this body has seen a lot of abuse the primer will aid in filling in scratches and continue to work towards a smooth base for the color coat. I did 2 coats of black primer sanding the first coat with 320 and the second with 400 grit.

    Third: Taping off the binding

    I tape off the binding with blue painters tape (green will work as well) . This reduces the amount of scraping on the binding. I used .25 inch width and cut the excess off with a razor. I made sure the bottom edge of the tape show a little binding (like half a cm). Its easier to scrape back the paint to the body binding seam than it is to add black paint to the areas of the body that were accidentally covered by tape.

    Here is how the sides turned out (there is one coat of clear on them in the picture that has not be sanded back yet) photo 1.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  19. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Fourth: The color coat


    I like to use rattle cans because I can use them and then toss them aside and I don't have a gun to clean up afterwards. I used Duplicolor paints that you can get at 90% of the auto stores here and the have great spray nozzle that can be adjusted for vertical and horizontal direction spraying in a nice fan pattern.


    For the top I used Duplicolor metal flake Burnt Copper and the sides I used their Gloss Universal Black.

    I shot the Copper first laying the body down flat then holding the can about 10 to 12 inches away at a 45 degree angle making the color and flake kind of fall onto the body. This results in a very dry coat that allows the metal specks to stand at different angles. After the coat is applied I spray a light dusting coat of Behlens nitro clear to lock in the flakes and let the newly painted side dry for an hour. Since these coats are going on very dry the body is now dry to the touch and can be flipped over and the same painting process is done to the other side.

    I do one coat per side each day for the next 3 days always working in threes ( 3 overlapping passes= one coat) for a total of no less than 3 coats per side when dealing with metallics.

    Here is the top of the guitar (note the pickup cavities are taped and paper is stuffed into the body to catch the overspray.)

    photo 5.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
    OldCowHand likes this.
  20. Flakey

    Flakey Electromatic

    81
    Oct 9, 2015
    Now I should have said this earlier that I did the top and back first then I covered the them with brown painters paper taping it down along the binding and then shot the sides and the neck with the Gloss black.

    Once the color coats were down I reattached the neck to the body apply wood glue to the neck block and neck tenon and since I dry fitted them several times to make sure the angle would be correct pushed the neck into the the block and tightened it in with a clamp. The neck is a floating neck meaning the portion of the neck that comes over the top of the body really doesn't go into the top but hangs over it. The proper specifications for the height is the distance of 11/32 inches from the guitar's top to the bottom side of the fretboard measured at the end of the fretboard.

    Once clamped into place I reinstall the screw into the neck block and fill in with wood put. I let it dry for one day and sand around the heal with 400 grit to contour the fill to the heal. I then shoot he neck block area with black paint and let dry. I sand smooth the the color coat around the fill area and shoot another coat of black. I repeat until the area is smooth. The plastic heal cap is taped off.

    This is the result: photo 2.JPG photo 3.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
    OldCowHand likes this.
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