What Things in Music Would You Really Like to Know?

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by drmilktruck, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    The New York Times is running a series called 11 Things We'd Really Like to Know, to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of their Science section.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/11/19/science/40th-anniversary-science-times.html

    In that spirit, what things in music would you really want to know the answer to? (Other than does wood make a difference in guitar tone? :D)

    Like, What does American Pie mean? (Other than Don McLean never has to work ever again.)
     
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  2. Floo

    Floo Country Gent

    Dec 16, 2012
    Elmshorn, Germany
    I wish somebody told me what "Diddy-Wah-Diddy" means...

    At this moment, I can't think of anything, but it will be interesting to watch this thread.
     
  3. Tinman46

    Tinman46 Country Gent

    Age:
    50
    Dec 19, 2011
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    I'd like to know how to play by ear. I'm guessing my lack of perfect pitch is part of it. So I guess my question is why do some people have perfect pitch and not others?

    For me American Pie is representative of a time where values where different, implied better.
     
  4. HypotenusLuvTriangle

    HypotenusLuvTriangle Country Gent

    Oct 27, 2010
    Whittier, Ca
    I'd like to know how to write lyrics, come up with really good hooks, and become famous and rich with the least amount of work.
     
  5. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    1. What's a "Pompatus of Love"?
    2. Who did put the Bop in the Bop Sha Bop?
    3. Will the circle stay unbroken?
    4. Why do fools fall in love?
    5. Who told Timberlake that he could sing?
     
  6. dafreeze

    dafreeze Friend of Fred

    Curious about that last one myself, Slim.

    I've often wondered whether Mickey and Sylvia ever fooled around

     
  7. afire

    afire Country Gent

    Who was the walrus?
     
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  8. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    Who killed Bobby Fuller?
     
  9. Tinman46

    Tinman46 Country Gent

    Age:
    50
    Dec 19, 2011
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    Where does a bullfrog get mighty fine wine?
     
  10. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    The walrus was Paul.
     
  11. thunder58

    thunder58 Gretschified

    Age:
    60
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    How is it that Mick Jagger is still alive ?
     
  12. slimwilson

    slimwilson Synchromatic

    Age:
    30
    791
    Dec 22, 2015
    Mobile, Al
    who wrote the book of love
     
  13. Setzerhotrod

    Setzerhotrod Country Gent

    Age:
    58
    Oct 26, 2011
    Anchorage Alaska
    I watched a great lesson by Justin Guitar. In a nutshell, you must get familiar with what intervals "sound like". In relation to the "1" or Root, call out to yourself names of the the intervals in the the melodies you already are familiar with. In his example, he puts his finger randomly on a string/fret and plays "happy birthday". Becoming familiar with what the intervals "look like" in the tune you are familiar with will help when you hear a different tune that more than likely have the same intervals, just mixed up in a differnt order.

    Which may not answer your question about why some people have perfect pitch, but I don't think that's necessary to play by ear. It's probably more in the time logged in doing it.
     
  14. Jelly Roll Horton

    Jelly Roll Horton Gretschie

    124
    Nov 10, 2017
    Portland, OR
    I would like someone to explain the importance or relevance of musical intervals and playing guitar to me in a way I can comprehend. I seem to have some kind of mental block on this aspect of music theory. (I have actually come to think I don’t even need to know this.)
     
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  15. loudnlousy

    loudnlousy Friend of Fred

    Age:
    53
    Oct 18, 2015
    Hildesheim, Germany
    Where does Elvis hide?
     
  16. calebaaron666

    calebaaron666 Synchromatic

    785
    Aug 15, 2018
    Portland, Maine
    I dunno about that,
    But didja know Bo wrote that song? He recorded it in 56, but never released it.
     
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  17. Tinman46

    Tinman46 Country Gent

    Age:
    50
    Dec 19, 2011
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    I Went looking for the video and he has a series of videos for ear training. Going to start watching them now. Thanks
     
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  18. Setzerhotrod

    Setzerhotrod Country Gent

    Age:
    58
    Oct 26, 2011
    Anchorage Alaska
    One of my fav teachers
     
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  19. Setzerhotrod

    Setzerhotrod Country Gent

    Age:
    58
    Oct 26, 2011
    Anchorage Alaska
    If you watch this starting at 3:30, it's how I explain the basics of what intervals "look like" on a guitar:

     
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  20. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Few people have what I prefer to call absolute pitch ("perfect" is a bit much; absolute makes more sense in the context of math and music) and it is absolutely not necessary to be good at music. I don't know if it really helps learn music. As someone who does have perfect pitch, it can also be a hindrance in learning aural skills and the solfage system, as one of the most important steps to truly understanding and knowing music is to understand music as relationships between notes (relative pitch) rather than a fixed set of notes in a specific key. This is how a good musicians can transpose any song into any key.

    While some very basic music training is required to know that you have absolute pitch (in order to name the notes), I don't know if it is trainable. For me, when I hear a note, I just know what it is. The feeling us that I have pitch or note in my head that I compare it to (my "center"), but of course it's not a specific note like A440. Aside from an unpracticed voice, I can usually sing or hum a specific note. My piano teacher discovered this "skill" when I was 5 or 6, so not a product of training. It tends to be harder when testing very high or low notes, so I wonder if it does involve some sort of training, repetition or rote learning/exposure.

    Imo its not much more useful than a parlor trick.

    But do do do train and practice relative pitch. Absolutely critical to learn and play music as relative pitch is the very definition of music.
     
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