Things to stop saying in 2019

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Alberta_Slim, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Country Gent

    Jan 19, 2012
    Maldon UK
    ...along with "no biggie". Grrrr.
     
    Alberta_Slim likes this.
  2. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
  3. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    If that ever happened then it wouldn't be it, it would be somewhen else.

    Back in the 90s we said it more succinctly. "Deal."
     
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  4. NJDevil

    NJDevil Gretschie

    447
    Jul 9, 2014
    Commack, NY
    Ahhhh yes, "Deal".....you shook alive some hibernating brain cells! Going back further, and as my father would say: "That's the bottom line!"
     
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  5. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    "Low hanging fruit"
     
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  6. Jockabilly

    Jockabilly Synchromatic

    Age:
    46
    589
    Sep 15, 2018
    Argyll
    "Low hanging fruit" ah the troubles of old age :D
     
    pmac11, benjwri, new6659 and 2 others like this.
  7. tartanphantom

    tartanphantom Country Gent

    Age:
    55
    Jul 30, 2008
    Murfreesboro, TN
    One more thing....can Millennials PLEASE stop using the phrase "No Problem" in place of "You're Welcome"???

    They do NOT mean the same thing!

    This is a huge pet peeve I have about young restaurant and retail staff. And whenever they say it, I just want to scream, "OF COURSE it's no problem, punk!... You're SUPPOSED to be serving me... It's your freaking JOB."




    Now get off my lawn!:mad::D:D
     
  8. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    "Take and put!
    "It needs fixed." No, it needs TO BE fixed.
    Imma
     
  9. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    The news today isn't what it was in the days of Walter Cronkeit. Now, it seems that every newscast starts off with "BREAKING NEWS!!!" It's all fearmongering, sensationalism, and Kardassian-like nonsense.
     
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  10. pmac11

    pmac11 Country Gent

    Age:
    55
    Mar 4, 2018
    Toronto, Ontario
    "Well to be honest with you..."
    This calls into question everything that was said before uttering this dubious phrase.
     
  11. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    "Have a nice day" said with total insincerity
     
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  12. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    "Your call is very important to us."
     
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  13. benjwri

    benjwri Country Gent

    Age:
    81
    Oct 27, 2011
    Central ON Can
    The interviewer says: "What's going on there John?" And John replies: "Well...…."
    And my other pet is: "I seen...." or "I been" It's "I have seen....I have been..."
     
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  14. englishman

    englishman Gretschified

    Age:
    61
    Apr 5, 2014
    Detroit
    Well, it could be argued that what we perceive as the impossible are for some unknown entity, entirely possible.
    I would think a more accurate saying would be "Some things are highly improbable".

    The superfluous 'what' drives me crazy, Troy Aikman is really terrible with it.

    The 'verbification' of words (which ironically is an example of itself).

    Splitting infinitives and all that..

    There is a distinct downside to allowing the language to descend into chaos. Words mean things and when the meaning becomes ambivalent, things can get dicey.
     
  15. Roger49

    Roger49 Country Gent

    Feb 18, 2015
    Germany
    Another one in the same family "No worries". I have worries you can't even imagine, just not perhaps in the subject of our current conversation.

    Oh and "Mate"
    I was out shopping for clothes with my brother in law (now 78 years old) and a just out of school, spotty faced shop assistant came over and said:
    "Can I help you mate?"
    My brother in law looked at him with a face that said it all and replied "I'm not your MATE!" I just had to laugh.
     
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  16. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    "I'm from the government, and I'm here to help."
    "Trust me." and "Believe me." from a politician.
    "Of course I'll respect you in the morning."
     
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  17. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Should we call a pea a pease, or an apron a napron? Cuz those are the "right" words. That is exactly how evolution works, and it applies to language as well. Errors are made, some of the errors become the standard either because of accident or convenience/efficiency.

    I mean, do people complain really that we don't speak proper Old English?

    Here's an interesting article. A quote: "But modern English is deformed Old English and degenerate Middle English. In other words, like any living language, it is “error” all the way down."

    https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2019/02/02/mistakes-are-the-engine-of-languages-evolution
     
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  18. Alberta_Slim

    Alberta_Slim Gretschie

    467
    May 18, 2018
    Ontario
    Henry, you are hereby awarded the title of G-T Official Contrarian. :p
     
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  19. Jockabilly

    Jockabilly Synchromatic

    Age:
    46
    589
    Sep 15, 2018
    Argyll
    While all languages evolve over time, I recall an old Gaelic Grammar I read that said something along the lines of "Only when a language is truly dead can you write a 'correct' grammar", there is a concern that it has become trendy to deliberately brutalise the English language in recent years. With English being already full of idiomatic useage where the groups of words have an accepted meaning which doesn't neccessarily have anything to do with the words if taken literally it makes the language very difficult for people who are autistic or are not born English speakers to understand what on Earth is truly being said and to deliberately modify the idioms is to make it even more confusing.

    'Do you feel me?' - No why on Earth would I want to lay my hands on you?
     
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  20. pmac11

    pmac11 Country Gent

    Age:
    55
    Mar 4, 2018
    Toronto, Ontario
    Spot on. Read a bit of Geoffrey Chaucer and it's clear how much the language has changed in 500 years or so.

    Sent from my SM-T560NU using Tapatalk
     
    Henry likes this.
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