Saucer Full of Secrets - Video

Discussion in 'THE Gretsch Discussion Forum' started by Mudshark, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. Mudshark

    Mudshark Synchromatic

    596
    Jul 20, 2012
    Canada
    Personally I avoid “tribute “ bands like the plague, there is just to much good music out there right now if you look for it. My tastes are eclectic From Third World rhythms to Rootsy Rockabilly. I still have an attraction to psychedelic music that I listened to in my formarative teen years. One of my first concerts was checking out Pink Floyd in Grade 9 (Ummaguma Tour tickets $3) performing their early songs like Saucer Full of Secrets, Astronomy Dominae, etc. Check out this This Nick Mason led show that is touring.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
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  2. LivingMyDream

    LivingMyDream Country Gent

    Cool video!

    I have to say that I am a fan of Nick Mason, especially because of the tempo at which Pink Floyd played. As a drummer, I know that it is tougher for a drummer to be rock solid on the tempo when it is slower, and Nick Mason did very good job of it. I always considered his drumming tasteful, and perfect for the band that he played in.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2019
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  3. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    "Set the controls for the heart of the sun"! Great stuff!
     
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  4. Sid Nitzerglobin

    Sid Nitzerglobin Country Gent

    Jun 8, 2015
    fROMOHIO
    I am supremely jealous Mudshark. UmmaGumma (especially the "live" first platter) and Meddle comprise my favorite Floyd. To see that live must have been mind blowing I'd imagine.
     
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  5. Mudshark

    Mudshark Synchromatic

    596
    Jul 20, 2012
    Canada
    Yes Sid. "Mind Blowing" is a good description. My best friend (still my best friend for 50+ years) and I took our girl teeny love interests as dates. We felt we were the youngest people there and we experienced seeing some acid freak outs which was scary for 14 olds. My friend's Dad drove us in his Oldsmobile and picked us afterword on a school night yet!

    UmmaGumma the first platter of a double album was played in its entirety which was most of the show as I recall. The gear set was exactly as depicted on the back cover of “Gumma", loads of Hi-Watt amps, a gong and Richard Wright had some joystick devise to “project" his organ to swirl around the auditorium. How did he do that in 1970? Rear speakers?

    “Meddle" was also fav with myself.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Pink Floyd had a home built quadrophonic PA system. Joystick controlled, they could pinpoint sound anywhere in the room. Biggest PA I'd ever seen/heard until the Dead's "Wall of Sound."

    Check out their "Live at Pompeii" video. PF were always technical innovators. Get their "Pulse" video as well.

    "Meddle" is one of my all time favorite albums, and "Wish You Were Here" is right up there as well.
     
  7. Mudshark

    Mudshark Synchromatic

    596
    Jul 20, 2012
    Canada
    ..and it all fit inside the Vauxhall Lorry. ha.
     
  8. loudnlousy

    loudnlousy Friend of Fred

    Age:
    53
    Oct 18, 2015
    Hildesheim, Germany
    Cool stuff. Thank you for sharing.
     
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  9. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Their gear rapidly expanded in size and scope as their popularity did. PF was cutting edge in many ways. I've worked in sound since the '60s, and the size and complexity of PA gear has exploded since then. Audept would likely agree. From 5-10 watt amps in the '50s, thru the Beatles getting the first large Vox amps, gear has gotten bigger and louder. Woodstock had big Altec PA horns and MacIntosh tube amps. Within the decade of the '70s, PAs (and lighting rigs) for concerts grew exponentially.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
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  10. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    Yep. In the '80s the main tour topic of conversation was "how many trucks of gear?" as if that was in any way related to the quality of the show. I did a few tours with U2 and by the time we got to "Zooropa" in 1993 it was totally over the top, including carrying several sea containers of generators capable of powering a small town in several different voltages. The feeder cables were the size of firehoses.
     
  11. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Amen, brother! Dragging 0000 feeders and dimmer racks, Socopex lighting cables, tons f loaded lighting trusses---glad I retired. I haven't been to see my chiropractor since. You know it'll be bad when there are two semis full of merch. I did a lot of rigging, so, I was first in, last out. Nothing like pulling heavy chain 90' straight up to the gridiron---44 times in one day. The Grateful Dead's first electrical "shore feed" hookup gear came from a salvaged navy destroyer. The Wall of Sound took 6 semis. When not on tour, the scaffolding was used in their warehouse/recording studio to line the walls.

    To get an idea of what a large scale load in/load out is somewhat like, check out the video for Dire Straights' "Heavy Fuel". Lots and lots of big black boxes. I still see 'em in my dreams.

    At least I didn't have to remove the brown M&Ms.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  12. Mudshark

    Mudshark Synchromatic

    596
    Jul 20, 2012
    Canada
    Hey you an adept should write a book on these adventures or maybe you already did! The other night I watched a HBO she called “Roadies”. Have you seen it and what do you think?
     
  13. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Don't have HBO---cable's pricey enough as it is. There's an old movie called "Roadie" staring Meatloaf. Haven't seen it all the way thru. Audept's spent far more time on the road than I. I did spend some time on the road forty years ago, but it was a different world then. Still, as Audept will tell you, what happens on the road, stays on the road.

    I worked at a university theater complex for over 30 years, running four main facilities, and maintaining a couple of others, as well as working campus and town gigs. Aside from the typical productions a university would require (commencements, lectures, student productions, etc.), we'd get road shows, rock shows, conferences---industrials and churches (imagine 7,000 Presbyterian youths)---and did everything a small mixed IATSE local would cover, from painting scenery for a huge XMas show (1/3 of my year) to running movies, videotaping the football and basketball teams, installing lighting and sound gear all over campus (50K students), and schlepping sound and lighting gear all over the Midwest. Hung a lot of conduit, pulled miles of wire, and even swept the floor after gigs and changed a lot of light bulbs as well. Trained a lot of student help. We had a small crew of 7 to ten guys, and lots of on-call part time help. As it was, I worked a lot of 12-16 hour days, often for weeks on end. Couldn't have done it without a good woman at home.
     
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  14. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    I don't want to write the book and end up in the witness protection program.......
    Having said that, I have considered writing a book and I have got as far as a few working titles:
    " Rock's in My Head"
    "Tour Tales"
    "Sonic Confessions"
    "Things your Groupie Grandma didn't Tell You"

    I haven't seen "Roadies", I'll try to track it down on Aussie cable TV.
     
  15. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Another title---"Everything You've Heard Is True."
    Zappa's "Joe's Garage" albums had a few examples of what the "Road" is like.
     
  16. Scott Fraser

    Scott Fraser Country Gent

    Jan 14, 2012
    Los Angeles
    The joystick was dubbed the "azimuth coordinator", operated by Rick Wright on top of his Farfisa. The Floyd quad really worked, unlike consumer quad of the day, which was stereo in front & stereo in back, & I say consumer hifi quad didn't work because the human auditory system is very poor at discerning left & right directionality behind the listener. Floyd had front (the main PA), far left, far right, & rear, & you could always tell where something was panned. They stacked a bunch of WEM columns on the far sides & back for the surround bits.
     
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  17. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    Ahhhh, the stories this could tell.
    Screenshot_2019-03-08-19-52-34-1.png
     
  18. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    I wouldn't call Nick Mason a tribute act, as he was the drummer on those songs originally. Great stuff. I remember seeing the Pompeii concert at the midnight movie when I was in high school. (The idea of a midnight movie seems so quaint now.)
     
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  19. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Gretschie

    177
    Jun 2, 2008
    Fort Collins, CO
    I love that picture! Military planes were often photographed like that with all of the armament spread out in front of it like Floyd did with their gear.

     
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