Said no guitarist ever ...

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by drmilktruck, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. johnny g

    johnny g Synchromatic

    888
    Sep 2, 2017
    union, ms
    Can't afford a new wife. Going to try mod's on the wife I have.
     
    benjwri, stevo, blueruins and 4 others like this.
  2. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    Good luck with that!
     
  3. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    That's suicide mentality. :eek:
     
    section2 and pmac11 like this.
  4. Where online can i find those mods and upgrades?
     
    Gretschtim1 and drmilktruck like this.
  5. Charging Charlie

    Charging Charlie Gretschie

    101
    Jun 21, 2018
    Maryland
    WHAT ?
     
    drmilktruck likes this.
  6. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    Re-wiring is difficult in that situation.
     
    johnny g and drmilktruck like this.
  7. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    I need to polish this case, it's so dusty...
     
    capnhiho and drmilktruck like this.
  8. Gretscho2

    Gretscho2 Newbie

    2
    Sep 15, 2018
    Annapolis, MD
    Where.
     
  9. Cassotto

    Cassotto Gretschie

    Age:
    45
    148
    Jun 16, 2019
    Spain
    I don't think there are many differences, apart from maybe some variation in pitch (the British Library in London has a tuning fork that belonged to Beethoven, and it is around one semitone high) and, of course, in personal interpretation of what's written, which happened then and now. I think so because, even back when Beethoven was alive, it was music that was meant to be played from a written score. When you're a classically-trained musician (maybe excepting some avant garde composers) you think in terms of music theory, and the music you come up with fits what you know can be written.

    I've had a very exhaustive classical training, and I find it limits me. Knowing how to read music is not necessary, but it's great, as long as it's not the only thing you can do. This is, I think, my main problem when trying to play the guitar.
     
    Gretschtim1 likes this.
  10. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Knowing how to read music does not limit creativity. It adds to your toolbox, but does not detract from your other tools. The only limit is time, and I can certainly see how spending ones time learning something else may be more useful in a particular situation.
     
    Cassotto and pmac11 like this.
  11. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    It’s a facet of musical knowledge that is very useful, but many excellent players don’t read. I’m all in favor of reading, and taught my students accordingly. That having been said, I know that some people are able to mentally amp a song without any written manuscript involved.

    If I have charts, I use them. I sight read when possible, but I learn plenty of songs from just a chord chart. Getting the chord progression into your head is very useful, whether you read it from a staff or a chord chart.
     
    Cassotto likes this.
  12. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    I agree. I have no issue with people choosing not to learn to read. My gripe is when they put forth the anti-intellectual argument that the knowledge somehow makes their music less creative or passionate, or soulless.
     
    Cassotto likes this.
  13. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    This rusty, beat up old National sucks, can i have a brand new one?
     
    drmilktruck and Charging Charlie like this.
  14. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    I guess we will never know but I just suspect that today's performances of pieces of music written hundreds of years ago sounds different in lots of ways. Tone of today's instruments, the attitude of the players vs. the way people felt back in those days. The design of the rooms the music was played in back then. Were the players back then more disciplined - did they play music for the love of it rather than players in today's orchestras playing for a weekly paycheck? What ever the answer may be it is fun to think about. Maybe the music sounds better today?
    I've actually seen a band leader punch out a bass player for making mistakes during a performance. I wonder if Beethoven ever did that...:D.
     
    Cassotto and drmilktruck like this.
  15. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I agree completely. The more I’ve learned, the easier it is to be creative. I can be disciplined, woodshed through a tune, counting carefully and playing as precisely as I can, but I can also cut loose and swing. One does not conflict with the other.
     
    Cassotto, pmac11 and Henry like this.
  16. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    All things being relative. Pitch, temperament, and material of strings are huuuuge in some circles... :)
     
    Cassotto likes this.
  17. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    I've worked a few performances of the Academy of Ancient Music. There's a noticeable difference in some period instruments compared to modern ones. It'd be more likely in the baroque period of Bach than Beethoven's, but there are still differences. Pianos have really changed over the years. Stradivarius violins are still considered the best ever made.

    That being said, I worked a small chamber group of 8 musicians. When the bassist was off stage, I noticed the surface cracking on his upright, just from obvious age. When I asked the age of it, he replied "1610". I wondered why he'd take such a valuable instrument on the road. "Nothing else sounds this good." He was right. Even back in the wings, I could feel the power of it when he played.
     
    pmac11, drmilktruck and Gretschtim1 like this.
  18. Alanqa

    Alanqa Electromatic

    7
    Aug 22, 2019
    Lancashire UK
    Here’s one you might not have heard before: it’s called smoke upon the water by a band called Dark Purple
     
    drmilktruck likes this.
  19. Cassotto

    Cassotto Gretschie

    Age:
    45
    148
    Jun 16, 2019
    Spain
    I agree to some extent: of course reading music is useful, and it 'adds' to your toolbox... Supposing you have something else in your toolbox. Of course, I wasn't generalising; I only meant to say that for some people who, like me, started reading music at a very early age and who, I suspect, aren't really creative or intuitive, or whatever it takes, it can be a hindrance. Well, no, not a hindrance. If I couldn't read music, I wouldn't be able to play any music at all, so reading music is not hindering, but helping me in that sense. I suppose it's more a matter of how I am. I suppose I learn things one way, and it's close to impossible for me to learn them any other way. I don't think I'm being too rigid, at least not on purpose.

    I attended guitar lessons for between four and five years, a long time ago. So it's not as if I haven't tried; after one year or so I suspected I wasn't going anywhere, but I didn't want to run the risk of giving up too soon. All I managed in those five years is playing the scale of G major all over the fretboard, and little else. My teacher played some rhythm guitar, which I had to copy. I was able to fret the chords more or less correctly, but as to the strumming, I couldn't copy him until I dissected what he was playing (like 'a crotchet down, two quavers down and up, a quaver silence and another three quavers starting upwards'). I know it sounds like I'm exaggerating, but it was basically that.

    I couldn't understand what was happening until I met a guitar teacher / session musician who had also had a classical training, and just after getting his degree got a job as a session musician in a recording studio. He was technically perfect, but had to leave after the first day because he had absolutely no idea what he had to do if he wasn't given some sheet music. I've discussed this with other friends from the conservatory, mainly pianists -some of them brilliant- that want to play some jazz, and it's more common that it seems. Maybe it's because of the way music is taught over here, or maybe the proportion of 'rigid' people is high.

    Anyway, lots of years have passed since my guitar lessons. I've forgotten the little I knew, so I'm starting from scratch, and I'm determined to carry on trying. I'm keeping sort of a log of my progress, and I can already see it's a slow one, but I'm persistent.

    Still, I believe that reading music has prevented me from being able to play more by ear. If I hadn't had that resource, maybe I'd have had to look for another way to do it, and I might have found it. Or maybe not.
     
    new6659 likes this.
  20. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Sorry, didn't read the whole post, I'm worried reading it all might affect my ability to talk and listen. ;)
     
    Cassotto and pmac11 like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice