RIP Frank Robinson

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Gretschtim1, Feb 7, 2019.

  1. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    Having grown up in Baltimore I got to witness the greatness of Frank Robinson. He was a great player who was the only player to ever win the MVP in both leagues. He hit 586 home runs during a period when pitchers dominated the sport - it was know as the dead ball era. More important than that he was also a great human being.
    He was with the Orioles during their most dominating period.
    RIP Frank - you made baseball and the world better by being here.
     
    MartyT, johnny g, LA Miles and 2 others like this.
  2. thunder58

    thunder58 I Bleed Orange

    Age:
    60
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    Sad to hear this one ....... Rest in Peace Mr. Robinson ......PLAY BAAAAAAAAAALL !!
     
    MartyT likes this.
  3. drmilktruck

    drmilktruck Gretschified

    May 17, 2009
    Plymouth, MN
    A great player and, by all accounts, a genuinely nice man too. RIP Frank.
     
    pmac11, MartyT and section2 like this.
  4. wildeman

    wildeman Gretschified

    May 10, 2015
    norcal
    A very rare combination these days, it would seem. RIP.
     
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  5. LivingMyDream

    LivingMyDream Country Gent

    Frank Robinson gave a lot of pleasure to us baseball fans. I am sorry to hear of his passing. RIP Frank.
     
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  6. section2

    section2 Synchromatic

    716
    Dec 21, 2016
    Toronto
    Sad news. A tremendous loss to the baseball world.

    The Blue Jays' former manager and current play-by-play announcer, Buck Martinez, tells a great story about playing winter ball in Puerto Rico in the early 70s on a team managed by Frank Robinson. They were playing their first game of the season against their arch-rivals, who were managed by the great Roberto Clemente:

    And there I was, in this sweltering Caribbean city, about to play the first game of the season in the biggest rivalry in Puerto Rican baseball. It was a tremendous atmosphere. The rum-fueled fans were wild before the game even started.

    Then the lights went out. The stadium went completely dark. The power was gone. As the stadium workers scrambled to find out what had happened, the carnival started to get ugly. The mood went from celebratory to rage-filled very quickly. It looked like the season opener would be canceled, and that wasn’t going to sit well with the 20,000 fans in the stadium. After several minutes of darkness a bank of lights on the first-base side of the stands of the field finally flashed on. It didn’t light up the whole diamond, but it was just enough to allow us to make out the ball.

    That’s when Robinson and Clemente decided to take batting practice.

    The two legends picked up bats and met at home plate. Under the shadowy light, they took turns hammering balls into the stands beyond the fence. The crowd went nuts. Each moon shot eclipsed the last, the light catching just one side of the balls as they arched through the dark sky before being swallowed by the booming mob. The sight of two of baseball’s biggest stars taking swing after swing as drums pounded and the fans continued their dance party in the aisles is something I’ll never forget. Crack ... crack ... crack ... hit after hit, Robinson versus Clemente in a home-run derby for the ages.

    When it became apparent that the one bank of lights was the only one that was going to come back on, Robinson came back to our dugout and told us to get ready to take the field. “We have to play this game,” he said. “The fans will go nuts if we don’t. They’ll riot and they’ll trash the place.”

    “Just be careful,” he added, as we grabbed our mitts and pulled on our caps. “You can only see half the baseball out there.”

    We played the whole game under that one bank of lights. The imperfection of it was beautiful; the shadows created a need to adjust to the natural elements, just like when we were kids playing on a street or city diamond.

    I don’t remember who won the game, but I’ll always remember that moment under a single slice of light playing baseball in San Juan. It was one of the most memorable experiences of my life. Decades later, I’d think back to that night when I was managing my first game in the major leagues in that very place, Bithorn Stadium, where the Blue Jays and Texas Rangers opened the 2001 season. It will always be a special place to me.
    I was in San Juan on vacation last month, and I was lucky enough to see the team that Robinson had managed play in the very same stadium. (The lights stayed on.)

    20190117_212628_HDR.jpg
     
  7. MartyT

    MartyT Gretschie

    444
    Apr 8, 2010
    Mount Laurel, NJ
    Frank Robinson might have been the most underrated superstar ever. he was right up there with Mays, Mantle, Aaron and Musial. I was fortunate enough to see him play several times when the Reds came into Connie Mack Stadium in Philly in the 60's.
     
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  8. LA Miles

    LA Miles Country Gent

    Dec 6, 2012
    UPSTATE NY
    I agree 100% - just went about his job.

    I'm not sure how the old-timers did it - without stepping out of the box between every pitch and adjusting their batting gloves they still managed to hit.
     
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  9. johnny g

    johnny g Synchromatic

    727
    Sep 2, 2017
    union, ms
    With all the junk going on in sports these days it is nice to hear a feel good story about a major great star and fine person.
     
    MartyT likes this.
  10. shrews824

    shrews824 Synchromatic

    Age:
    42
    951
    Feb 22, 2016
    Hardinsburg, Kentucky
    I'm a huge Cincinnati Reds fan and I really hated to hear this as well. I still believe this was the worst trade in Reds history when they traded him to Baltimore.
     
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  11. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    Great story - thanks for sharing it with us...:).
     
    section2 likes this.
  12. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    I think the players today are pampered too much. Now if a pitcher goes 5 innings they call it a quality start. I remember Jim Palmer and Mike Flanagan pitching into the tenth & eleventh innings and Earl Weaver would still ***** at them for getting tired. Lots of times they pitched 300 innings a year. Who does that now? The players today are wimps compared to guys like Frank - there's too much show boating in every sport these days.
     
    MartyT likes this.
  13. Gretschtim1

    Gretschtim1 Country Gent

    Dec 4, 2012
    Dundalk, Md
    The worst in Reds history and the best in Orioles history...:D.
     
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  14. shrews824

    shrews824 Synchromatic

    Age:
    42
    951
    Feb 22, 2016
    Hardinsburg, Kentucky
    Indeed, indeed.
     
  15. LA Miles

    LA Miles Country Gent

    Dec 6, 2012
    UPSTATE NY
    Case in point - Mel Stottlemyre - pitched for the Yanks, very underrated- 356 starts and 152 complete games. Today they waste most of their pitches warming up forever and throwing too much on their days off.
     
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  16. MartyT

    MartyT Gretschie

    444
    Apr 8, 2010
    Mount Laurel, NJ
    Yep. If you pulled that stuff with Bob Gibson or Don Drysdale (or most pitchers), the next pitch would be in your ribs....or higher. Man, I know I'm showing my age (yet again), but I really miss that version of baseball. It was a beautiful game to watch.
     
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  17. section2

    section2 Synchromatic

    716
    Dec 21, 2016
    Toronto
    My pleasure. It's from Buck's excellent memoir, "Change Up."
     
    Gretschtim1 likes this.
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