Poor me. Crying in my beer

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by Jelly Roll Horton, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Winterwind

    Winterwind Gretschie

    163
    Dec 17, 2018
    London, Ontario
    I'm a big fan of not giving up. I've done some damage to my hands over the years. In brief, no family, group homes and foster homes and was nervously cracking my knuckles at 10 when my bones were still developing. Then martial arts did some more damage when I started that at 16. Arthritis has been on its way for a long time.

    I've never been able to play proper bar chords where I lay my index finger across five or all six strings. At least one string is dead and barred 7th chords... forget about.

    But keep playing. Music is a mix of passion, natural gifts and practice practice practice. Most obstacles can be overcome or worked around.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  2. Jelly Roll Horton

    Jelly Roll Horton Gretschie

    163
    Nov 10, 2017
    Portland, OR
    Wow! I am sincerely touched by the thoughtful, encouraging, and caring responses from you guys, and from all over the world! Music really is a universal language, and it is uplifting to realize we share many of the same struggles, and heartening that you all are so generous and willing to advise from your own experiences. This forum and its members are a real treasure. Thank you every one for your stimulating and revitalizing words.

    I had seen Richter's YouTube videos before, and admired his abilities. Thank you Yukomajo for the Richter sale link; I bought two of them, and am anxious to try them out.
     
  3. Rusty Silver

    Rusty Silver Gretschie

    Age:
    47
    215
    Jun 25, 2017
    Italy (Rome and Genoa)
    Simply as drinking a beer with friends... ;)
     
  4. DougCraft

    DougCraft Gretschie

    148
    Apr 24, 2018
    Northern Colorado
    Yah - get into a band and stink up the public space. Practice in and of itself is essentially meditative - you have to jam to realize the application of your practice. I also benefitted from playing bass. Gives you a different perspective and makes you a better musician.
     
  5. calebaaron666

    calebaaron666 Country Gent

    Aug 15, 2018
    Portland, Maine
    Also, writing songs can make life worth living. Even if they’re terrible!
     
    Les Pedals, Alberta_Slim and Merc like this.
  6. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Don't cry in your beer. It dilutes it and makes it all salty and stuff.
     
  7. Howard hughes

    Howard hughes Synchromatic

    Age:
    38
    566
    Mar 22, 2018
    London
    I teach my girlfriend guitar about twenty minutes a day, and when i see the frustration building in her i tell her to come back to it tomorrow. when the next day comes without fail what she had learned the previous day comes easier to her. good luck never give up!
     
  8. dlew919

    dlew919 Gretschie

    427
    Jul 18, 2016
    Sydney, Australia
    It seems to me you’ve stumbled on the truth of acoustic and electrics - they’re different instruments. Much like the organ and the piano.

    One - less notes on the electric.

    Two - less hard playing

    Three - approach dynamics differently.

    Four - listen to electric players who play acoustic. Example Eric Clapton. Brian May. Listen to how their approach differs but also how it sound the same

    Five - it’s not slow progress. It’s not fast progress. It’s your progress. Have fun. I bet you have improved more than you think.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  9. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    I'm pretty sure my guitar skills peaked around 1994, 2 years after I started. Best of luck.
     
  10. MartyT

    MartyT Gretschie

    405
    Apr 8, 2010
    Mount Laurel, NJ
    I think everyone falls into a slump or a "rut" from time to time. Sometimes we succumb to self-imposed pressure and expectations.

    My way of dealing with it is to forget about having to learning a certain thing, and just have fun with the guitar. Relax and play things that are fun for you. Don't place undue pressure on yourself. Enjoy playing like you're 12 years old again. You can have endless hours of fun with a D-18!

    It's just a slight shift in perception, but that's usually enough. Eventually, when it feels right, you'll circle back to learning new things with a fresh pair of ears and a new perspective.
     
  11. LivingMyDream

    LivingMyDream Country Gent

    Winterwind, I understand how old injuries can limit us on the guitar. I, too, have trouble with an old injury, and it's on my left hand. I took a basketball right in to the middle finger on my left hand, suffering a sprain and a dislocation on separate joints. It didn't heal properly, because I was an active, athletic kid. To this day when I try to bend that finger it will sometimes lock, so trying to do a Barre chord in the E shape, is pretty iffy. I also had to learn a slightly different way to finger an open D chord. It means that not everything is open to me on the guitar, but I still enjoy playing, and I figure out how to do things my own way, and keep trying to move forward. I keep reminding myself that playing any musical instrument is a journey, and not a destination, so I enjoy the ride as much as I can.
     
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  12. brodg68

    brodg68 Electromatic

    8
    Jan 18, 2018
    north carolina
    I am likely never going to be in a band. The thing that has helped me more than anything to move over the plateau in the last year was a $100 craigslist nylon classical guitar and a few internet PDFs. I saw zero improvement but my beloved bride said all my playing sounds better. Plus it means adding a new guitar to the house! - stay in there swinging
     
  13. Bertotti

    Bertotti Country Gent

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    I try something completely different, music, genre, instrument. I even fire up the PlayStation and play rock smith anything to divert my mind a little bit still with music.
     
    Alberta_Slim likes this.
  14. Gregor

    Gregor Electromatic

    45
    Oct 17, 2018
    Canada
    Excellent point. I have a 16 year old grandaughter who wanted me to show her "how to play guitar". I had played acoustic in our church group for a number of years and then sort of retired when the group stopped. Hadn't picked up the guitar for a few years but now have regained the love. Even bought my first electric(Gretsch of course or I wouldn't be here) and can see that I'm improving a lot just because I'm teaching the basics to someone else. Grandchildren will do that for us..........God's reward to us for not killing our children
     
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  15. 5120mantis

    5120mantis Country Gent

    Age:
    45
    Mar 6, 2011
    nj
    Maybe less is more? Cut back on your practice time, maybe it wil draw you back in if you limit your time.
     
    Merc likes this.
  16. Merc

    Merc Gretschie

    350
    May 6, 2017
    Florida
    I would ask yourself a few questions.

    What are your realistic goals with playing? Is it to to simply relax, play around family, jam around, write/record your own music, working as professional/gigging musician?

    And what do your two hour practice sessions consist of... repeating chords, scales, learning new songs, writing your own stuff, or simply noodling around? Are the sessions on target with the earlier questions?

    Unless you’re a working musician who’s life depends on it to put bread on the table, just have some fun with guitar. Try not to get hung up for not being on same playing level of someone who’s life does.
     
  17. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Synchromatic

    Age:
    61
    526
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    Are you taking any lessons? You have to look for the small victories. I started playing about 5 years ago. One of my teachers has been playing since he was 5!! Give yourself a break and set goals that are achievable. The things that made you happy playing acoustic, maybe bring them into the electric in small doses. One of my teachers said that 15 minutes of good practice is better than an hour of bad practice. Also look for beginner lessons on you tube. Eric Blackmon has a great First solo blues lesson.