Playing 'up the neck' is there much advantage in double cuts?

Discussion in 'THE Gretsch Discussion Forum' started by Jockabilly, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Country Gent

    Jan 19, 2012
    Maldon UK
    The center block Streamliners are feather light.
     
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  2. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    I have a 5422.
    If you have good technique there are no advantages in high fret access on a double cutaway imo :)
     
  3. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    It allows the joint to be further up the neck, usually about 3 frets.
     
  4. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    Henry I invite you to have a close look at the upper frets of a 5420 and 5422 (and also the 62 models with and without cutaways). Only diff is the addition of a top cutaway on the 5422. That allows you to access the bass strings on frets 15 to 18 from above. That would help if you fingered those frets from above ... but I never do - do you?

    Standard technique is to get access to all strings on the high frets from below. As a top cutaway does not improve access from below it provides no advantage if you use standard technique imo. Play them both and you'll find the same :)

    It would help however if you want to access the top bass strings with your hand above the fret board. Some guys do that for entertainment value but i'm not a big enough show off for that :)
     
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  5. Jockabilly

    Jockabilly Gretschie

    214
    Sep 15, 2018
    Argyll
    I guess I don't have 'good' or 'standard' technique then which is perfectly possible as I was never taught how to play (I didn't even use any books).

    I must admit that I had always imagined that double cuts were introduced to guitars in order to try and allow more comfortable playing access to the upper frets for those of us who weren't taught to play in a classical style and had bad habits like having our thumbs on the upper area of the rear of the neck as an anchor.
     
  6. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    The 3 frets make a difference to me, if it doesn't for you, then that's great. The 5622v1had a higher joint than the 5620v1. Never played q 5422 so I'll take your word.

    If we extend your reasoning, then having the neck joint extend all the way to the nut would not affect playability. It would certainly be good for people who like fat necks!
     
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  7. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Symmetry is its own reward!
     
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  8. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    5420.png 5422.png @Waxhead, I'm looking at picture online and I am pretty sure the 5422 joint is higher.

    See these closeups. Joint is at 14th fret on the 5420, 18th fret on the 5422.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018 at 9:02 PM
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  9. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    ok your pics show it well :)
    All I'm saying is that if you are accessing all the frets and strings from the bottom (right side on your pics) then it makes no difference if the upper side is cutaway or not.
     
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  10. Waxhead

    Waxhead Country Gent

    Aug 30, 2014
    Australia
    yes resting your thumb on the top edge of the fretboard is the issue. You'll find it lots easier, and it enables much faster playing, if you drop that thumb low down on the back of the fretboard. It also gives you much longer reach with your fingers to get at those 17 to 22 frets.

    Drop that thumb down low and a double cutaway makes zero difference imo to fret access on all strings :)
     
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  11. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Sorry Vista
    Admin Post
    Truer words were never spoken. Centering your thumb on the back of the neck lends a true advantage.

    The cutaway on the bass side really doesn’t do much and, unless the body joins at a higher place on the neck, the double-cut is more about style than it is about function.
     
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  12. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    Absolutely agree. Good posture is good.

    However, even using good posture, having the joint farther up means fewer frets where your fretting hand thumb is on a fat body or the joint, rather than the slimmer, theoretically more comfortable neck.
     
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