Is it fixable???

Discussion in 'Technical Side of Things' started by Junior94, Mar 13, 2020.

  1. Jelly Roll Horton

    Jelly Roll Horton Country Gent

    Nov 10, 2017
    Portland, OR
    I guess I’d say make it playable if you can without putting a lot of money into it, and give it to a kid who can’t afford a guitar but really wants to play. You might inspire a future SRV or Knopfler. We never know what influence we might have with very small gestures.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2020
  2. Teledriver

    Teledriver Gretschie

    Age:
    52
    291
    Feb 12, 2011
    Iowa City, IA
    I see guitars like this and in this condition hanging on the walls of restaurant chains (we all know the ones) and always ponder that with a little of this and alot of that it could be made playable. If I had it as wall art in my home it would get to the point where it was worth a try.
    Then the rabbit hole would get bigger, and more expensive- pickups, tuners, nut, bridge, more-usable vibrato, etc, etc. $$$$
    Beware, but proceed with caution.
     
    Alanqa likes this.
  3. Alanqa

    Alanqa Gretschie

    186
    Aug 22, 2019
    Lancashire UK
    You guys make me sad. I was given a wreck of a guitar earlier this year with a burned headstock and most people said the same thing. “It’s not worth fixing”. “it’s wall art at best” “burn it with fire” etc.

    well I think guitars have a soul of sorts, they all long to be loved and played and old wrecks like this are no exception. There is a story and a song in them all. Take your time and fix the damage first then bit by bit bring it back to life.
    This is my “wreck” now. It is a really pretty, very playable tone monster despite having the cheapest hardware and pickups eBay could provide. Every thing on this guitar was bought new for less than £80
     

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  4. drrohle

    drrohle Synchromatic

    794
    Jan 3, 2014
    Hays, KS
    Here is my Peavey "Dumpster Find". It was nothing but a banged up body with NO electronics (except the pups). Turned out nice and plays very well after my home restoration.
     

    Attached Files:

    Alanqa, new6659 and Ricochet like this.
  5. Teledriver

    Teledriver Gretschie

    Age:
    52
    291
    Feb 12, 2011
    Iowa City, IA
    This got me thinking about my own salvage project...
    Two few years ago I was given an attic find. No, it wasn't the Broadcaster I was hoping for, but earlier.
    It's a 1930's Supertone bowl back mandolin. The neck came unglued, and when it went a section of fingerboard went with it. The neck tongue is 90% intact, but the groove in the body needs attention, and the gap on the fingerboard...obviously. I have the original saddle, but not the tailpiece or nut. Frets seem okay. The tuners are there, but won't turn. Splits on each side of the headstock say there is a serious issue going on. The back of the headstock has a steel plate screwed onto it, and despite the fact I had time to arrange the pics, I didn't take that plate off in fear of what I'd find.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Looking at it....yeah, I can do that!!
     
    Rich Rice, Alanqa and new6659 like this.
  6. Teledriver

    Teledriver Gretschie

    Age:
    52
    291
    Feb 12, 2011
    Iowa City, IA
    BTW, that's not a crack in the side of the body, but rather a really cool design feature I haven't taken a pic of. If you google for this mando you'll probably find a pic of what I'm talking about. The body itself is really cool.
     
  7. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    WTH did they do to the headstock. Is that a saw tooth profile I see?
     
  8. Teledriver

    Teledriver Gretschie

    Age:
    52
    291
    Feb 12, 2011
    Iowa City, IA
    No, but I see what you mean. The other side only has one split in the middle (2nd tuner from the top), in a similar triangle shape towards the plate. It goes with the grain in the wood.
    Overall, I'd say the wood has seriously dried out, and caused the issue...Or else whatever is under that steel plate/tuners caused it...
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2020
  9. O Riley

    O Riley Gretschie

    I agree. Cool find, just something you wouldn't want to dump any $$ into.
     
    mbkri likes this.
  10. andreww1962

    andreww1962 Gretschie

    195
    Apr 30, 2019
    Toronto
    Looks like you'd need to solidify those three blocks that form the neck pocket. Logicaly its pretty simple, glue in those two separations and clamp them together. The crack on the back shouldn't matter as that doesn't seem to be structural. The problem as I see it is that there is no way to get a clamp on those three pieces without removing either the top or the back. And thats a lot of space to close up, the whole thing might splinter before the cracks are pushed together.
     
  11. stevo

    stevo Friend of Fred

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    It's an endless rabbit hole. Good teaching guitar for repairs, but I wouldn't spend money on it.
     
    mbkri likes this.
  12. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    If someone knows how to work metal he could whip up a simple but effective clamp in no time, but any neck block repair is pointless if you can’t properly connect it to the body’s sides and plates.
    The neck block is the only thing extending the structural integrity from neck to the body per the sides, front and back, and judging from the large gaps in the neck block, it seems to have become separated from the front and back.
     
  13. wabash slim

    wabash slim Gretschified

    Age:
    70
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Anything can be fixed if you throw enough time and money at it. At some point, you've got to ask yourself if it's really worth the time and expense.
     
  14. mbkri

    mbkri Country Gent

    Sep 22, 2012
    Chicago
    I’d replace the neck with a new Fender telecaster neck, and replace the body with a loaded telecaster body. I think it will sound great.
     
  15. Junior94

    Junior94 Gretschie

    176
    Jul 29, 2017
    Texas
    That's what I was thinking. I wanted a strat neck though. And one gold foil pickup in the bridge. Keep the neck cavity open like Malcom Young
     
  16. nnieman

    nnieman Newbie

    2
    May 12, 2019
    ontario, canada
    I actually have one of those bodies sitting on a shelf.
    I have no plans for it.
    It’s yours for cost of shipping (from Canada) if you want it.
    It looks identical but ok shape.

    I have glued some blocks under the pickup routes so it could take dogear p90s but they would be easily removed.

    Nathan
     
    Junior94 likes this.
  17. Junior94

    Junior94 Gretschie

    176
    Jul 29, 2017
    Texas
    Heck yes
    Heck yes I'll take it. Just gotta find out how much shipping is
     
  18. Junior94

    Junior94 Gretschie

    176
    Jul 29, 2017
    Texas
    I understand. I have my gretsc
    I understand. I have my Gretsch's to hold me over. I know it's not worth much. It's a beater guitar. It has character and I don't care if I get a ding or a scratch on it. Playable is good enough for me.
     
  19. Spotcheck billy

    Spotcheck billy Newbie

    2
    Oct 16, 2014
    Commodore Hotel
    I would hate to see it go to waste. Most "trashed" guitars can be made useful again and that's good karma. Over time most of us have accumulated a drawer or two full of odd parts so if you can dip into the bin, you won't be out any cash. You may simply consider removing the back and gaining access to the internal structure to make life easier during the neck pocket repair. Heat, patience, and determination will help you in that process. Best of luck and may she live to sing again!
     
  20. rockinstephen

    rockinstephen Electromatic

    I was thinking "yes" until I saw that nasty crack under the neck plate. It might be fixable but probably not worth the cost...
     
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