Interesting Gretsch Guitars at Rainbow Guitars

Discussion in 'THE Gretsch Discussion Forum' started by Synchro, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I visited Rainbow today and saw two guitars that I wanted to mention at the forum as a PSA,

    First was a 2004 6120 Jr. which looked price was $1,600.

    674F85F2-3160-464C-BC17-A13708AB45F2.jpeg

    The other was a vintage Corvette, $995, if memory serves.

    D6BF2E48-2A74-472B-BA68-E0F22030C0DF.jpeg
     
  2. Winnie Thomas

    Winnie Thomas Gretschie

    286
    Jun 13, 2011
    Cochise AZ
    You know the guy that owned the 6120 JR. He lives in Willcox.
     
  3. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I should have given it a play, while I was there. A lot of people like those juniors.
     
    audept, benjwri and thunder58 like this.
  4. jfassett

    jfassett Gretschie

    366
    Dec 9, 2017
    Tucson
    Last time I visited Rainbow, I was disappointed in the Gretsch selection.. Very few in stock for a Gretsch dealer.
     
  5. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Harvey doesn’t seem to stock a lot of Pro Series these days.
     
  6. jfassett

    jfassett Gretschie

    366
    Dec 9, 2017
    Tucson
    Yeah, it’s a bummer, really wanted to try out a few pro series Gretsch guitars, I have 4 electromatics
     
  7. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Gretschie

    235
    Jun 2, 2008
    Fort Collins, CO
    One thing I miss about living in Tucson is Rainbow Guitars!
     
    BorderRadio likes this.
  8. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Like all other businesses, Harvey has to stock whatever sells. He trades in vintage instruments, and I’d venture to say that his return on investment from that element of his business is favorable. But the bread and butter, day in and day out business is built, like with so many other stores, on the sales of lower to mid-priced instruments. When I got a teaching job in a store which sold Gibson & Fendrr Guitar’s, it was explained to me that they made their money selling entry level instruments.

    It would be great if there were stores with the full line of Gretsch Pro Series Guitars in stock, but such stock would be the rare exception in the business climate of our day. Rainbow Guitars seems to be doing well, but prospering in today’s business climate requires constant attention. In order to survive, a business has to keep an eye upon both return on investment and turn-around time. Simply stated, no one can afford a showroom full of high-end guitars these days, unless they are in a massive market area and are able to move product very swiftly.

    If you want to see Something amazing, go the Vegas. There’s a Sam Ash and a Guitar Center. The Sam Ash is a great store with great stock. They are is full-line, saxophones, trumpets, violins, you name it, so they make their money on much more than guitars, etc. It’s one of the better stores I’ve ever visited. The GC had very little in stock beyond some entry level gear. There may have been one or two Korean-made Gretsch in stock, nothing pro line.
    It’s one of the best stores still in existence.
     
    Paul in Colorado and jfassett like this.
  9. Sabato

    Sabato Gretschie

    419
    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
  10. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    His market is a bit larger than Tucson.
     
  11. Sabato

    Sabato Gretschie

    419
    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    Yes Sir, considering I'm buying from Massachusetts....
    Some say don't buy a guitar that you haven't played, but I knew exactly what I wanted and I knew that Rocky had it and that I would get a good deal AND have it in my hands in 24 hours. I would never even walk into a Guitar Center, snob that I am. The Mom and Pop stores that may be local must get every cent possible for their wares to pay the overhead on low volume. Local stores don't carry anything that won't sell a lot, meaning they have low end products as you say for beginners.
    Rocky would ship it for free to Tucson too! :)
     
  12. Winnie Thomas

    Winnie Thomas Gretschie

    286
    Jun 13, 2011
    Cochise AZ
    If you looked at the wall where the Gibsons used to hang you'll see a very large number of $2K-$5K Fenders
     
  13. sh4rkbyt3

    sh4rkbyt3 Gretschie

    356
    Mar 8, 2019
    Elkton, MD
    Very true these days. That's why places like Norman's Rare Guitars and the like have a niche on that market and to try to get into now at this point you'd need more than just very fat and heavy wallet. Mom & Pop's are all but gone from my area because they couldn't stock the type and variety of pinstruments like GC can. However GC didn't put them out of business (at least here) the argument could be made they put a heavy strain on a somewhat fickled or dying market but many of the stores closed long before or very shortly before our closest GC even opened. Add to it the Internet and you've dwindled down what was already a shrinking retail environment. I can get on Ebay and see thousands of guitars and even some alleged rare ones.

    What does that leave the Mom & Pop stores? Very little in many areas when you can have it delivered right to your door. And prior to, tax free even. Another segment of the market though wants that hands on feel, smell and personal sound right in front of them before making a purchase and rightfully so. My cheapest guitar to date was a used Fernandes Dragonfly at $200 and even that was purchased in person. The only 2 guitars I bought unplayed and untouched were my Ibanez JS1200CA from someone who I knew and had done business with before and my Gretsch G7593T-BD because of the stores outstanding reviews. Other than that I would have loved to deal with a Mom and Pop store locally but they've almost all vanished, and the few that do still exist have such a limited inventory and carry brands I wouldn't be inclined to buy. I do try to support them by buying my strings and smaller items though inlcuding cases when I can.

    My guess is that we'll see GC vanish in the future and then a small resurgence of the Mom & Pop's will happen again. GC's problem is they're woefully understaffed and if you as a customer need some serious attention by a salesperson you probably won't get it or at best it will be very limited and that's not the employees fault but how the business model is structured. How will that fair for the online market? Hmm I think we'll likely see them also downsize or be absorbed by other companies but it's hard to really tell with the popularity of online retail right now which still has room to grow yet. That might be a longer delay?
     
  14. LA Miles

    LA Miles Country Gent

    Dec 6, 2012
    UPSTATE NY
    There ya go - you have 4 Electromatics and no Prolines - that's where most dealers are making money. Not knocking you at all, just seems to be reality in todays guitar world. It's tough to vene sell a mint used Proline at a reasonable price.

    Hopefully you'll be able find a few to try.
     
    jfassett likes this.
  15. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    I’ve dealt with Street Sounds and have a high opinion of them.
    Harvey moves a fair number of those.
    It’s a sad situation. I don’t claim to have any answers. A handful of stores seem to stay afloat. It’s a matter of exceptional skill and a cautious approach. I would hope that someday we will see small shops, music and otherwise, make a comeback. I miss having local businesses around. I understand that the world has changed. Business has certainly changed drastically in my lifespan.
     
    Sabato and sh4rkbyt3 like this.
  16. sh4rkbyt3

    sh4rkbyt3 Gretschie

    356
    Mar 8, 2019
    Elkton, MD
    I could very well be wrong with my predictions but everything still seems to be somewhat cyclical despite a lot of the changes. The one big thing in retail though still, is Customer Service. When the customer walks out feeling like they were catered to it makes all of the difference in the world for repeat sales. Not just from loyalty perspective but knowing they were treated right. That's what the big box chains and online can't do.
     
    Sabato likes this.
  17. 6124Bassman

    6124Bassman Gretschie

    418
    May 20, 2018
    Tempe, Arizona
    Notice any old fender amps in there?
     
  18. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    What I see is a change in the very nature of the supply chain. Think of the name “store”. Stores, in the past, were the last link in the distribution chain, “storing” goods at a location convenient to their customer base. In a frontier town, the store had goods shipped in and served as a warehouse for the necessities of the community. The value they added was bringing these goods to the community and keeping a stock. If your shovel handle broke, the general store could have you back is business a lot more quickly than waiting for the Wells Fargo wagon or the railroad to bring you a replacement.

    It’s notable that the world of mail order started when Richard Sears, a railroad agent, took advantage of his railroad connections to market and distribute a consignment of distressed freight watches. As the business grew, the Sears company was as much a distribution system as it was a retail company. If customers in a given town ordered items from the Sears catalog, those items would be shipped to the local Sears store and those catalog customers could pick up their items, pay for the transaction and even use a company credit card. It was a well integrated system and made Sears massively profitable.

    The transportation of goods was key. Retailers, from time immemorial, have been logisticians, of one sort or another. Arranging the transport of goods to locations convenient to their customers, and that is what has actually changed, especially in the era of Internet commerce. Let me give you an example; in the early ‘80s, I wanted a copy of a certain Paul Desmond album, so I went to a Musicland store, pored through a paper catalog and located an item number. The clerk wrote it down and I waited, and waited and waited. As an experiment, I just looked it up on the Internet, found it on Amazon and could have had a copy on the way with two taps on the screen of my iPad. The old Musicland store at the mall just can’t compete. Probably more to the point, if I dropped by Musicland and they didn’t have my item, I had to wait. If I were to visit a CD store these days, and didn’t find what I was looking for, I could order it myself from any number of online sources and it would be waiting in my mailbox a day or two later.

    It isn’t simply a matter of Amazon and eBay competing with retailers, it’s UPS, FedEx and the USPS, which are making this change in the supply chain possible. A few years back, I needed a student instrument. I tried some local stores, but no one had one locally, not even GC. Just driving to a music store to pick one up would have increased the cost by 10% - 15%, or I could have one on my front porch in two days, ordering from Amazon. I wanted to buy it from a brick and mortar store, but it wasn’t feasible. Amazon isn’t putting the mom and pop stores out of business, Amazon Prime, with its free shipping, is heart of the problem.

    It’s a matter of economics. Amazon and eBay ship a lot of packages and are able to negotiate discounts. The local mom & pop have to pay more for shipping, because it’s not economically feasible to give them the same discounts.

    It’s a complicated problem.
     
    sh4rkbyt3 and new6659 like this.
  19. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson
    Admin Post
    Typically, he has a number of vintage Fender amps in stock. Check his site: https://www.rainbowguitars.com/
     
  20. Sabato

    Sabato Gretschie

    419
    Mar 22, 2019
    Massachusetts
    I grew up in a tiny town with a beautiful downtown with every sort of retail store, I call it Mayberry (in Connecticut). But a large indoor Mall in a nearby city destroyed that downtown retail environment. Ironically, the Internet later destroyed that mall. Nowadays I'm extremely pleased to get a good deal, free shipping and have everything come to my door.
     
    sh4rkbyt3 likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice