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I tried Monel strings finally

Discussion in 'Guitar & Gear Reviews' started by Wozob, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Aymara

    Aymara Friend of Fred

    Jul 6, 2013
    Germany
    Aah ... inspired by Rich I did some more research about the history of steel strings and I found this:

    http://www.theguitarmagazine.com/features/all-about/all-about-electric-strings/

    Quote:

     
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  2. Ricochet

    Ricochet Gretschified

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
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  3. Aymara

    Aymara Friend of Fred

    Jul 6, 2013
    Germany
    It seems, that Monel strings were developed by Gibson and the reason was to have a string set, that can be used for acoustics as electrics as well, which the name Electric Spanish implies.

    PS: Further goals were reduction of corrosion and less tension.

    PPS: Check this out too:

    http://www.gibson-prewar.com/gibson-mona-steel-strings/

    Does that ring a bell?
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
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  4. ruger9

    ruger9 Country Gent

    Nov 1, 2008
    NJ
    I love the Monels.... on certain guitars.

    I find acoustic strings (unlike electrics, which imo are much for forgiving) must be matched to the guitar. I have 3 acoustics, and they all get different strings because those are the strings that sound best on THAT guitar. The Monels are mellow, so they go on my laminate Yamaha, which is tight sounding and could use the warmth. Conversely, on my already-warm cedar-topped Walden, it gets bright Sunbeam strings to bring out the clarity.

    I did not know that about the Monels working well with pickups tho... when I finally get my ES-150-style guitar, I will definitely try them.... I wonder if these (the original Monels) were possibly what Charlie Christian was stringing up with back in the day?
     
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  5. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    The volume will be the result of the quantity of magnetic material that's vibrating over the pickups. I assume you can adjust the "eq" of the tone with various alloys, but I don't have any science to back that up.
     
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  6. Aymara

    Aymara Friend of Fred

    Jul 6, 2013
    Germany
    ... and the distance between string and pickup, which both in sum are the influencing factors for the strength of the magnetic field, right?
     
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  7. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson, AZ
    Admin Post
    All that the pickups can sense are the ferritic elements of the string. Various alloys will have varying degrees of ferritic content and the signal coming off the pickups will be affected. I would imagine that the various alloys also have different acoustic properties. I had a little metallurgy, back in tech school, but barely enough to be dangerous. :)
    As I understand it, there are all sorts of influences at play, the shape of the magnet, the pole pieces (if applicable), the way the coils are arranged, and any number of other things. All are measurable and predictable in isolation, but as the number of these elements combine it becomes pretty tricky and, eventually, even the most astute and learned pickup designer has to build the durned thing, plug it in, and see how it sounds when playing "Stairway". :)
     
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  8. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    Yea, I was thinking in terms of isolating material as a factor. IE, same string size/geometry and distance with less magnetic material will result in lower output.
     
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  9. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    Yes I do think this might have an influence on the "tone" shape. But believe that amplitude of the signal is purely a result of quantity of magnetic material when everything else is kept constant - string diameter, distance, pick force and material. Yes? No? I'm trying to think of ways that this could be wrong...
     
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  10. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson, AZ
    Admin Post
    As best I understand it, the ferritic material in the string cuts through the magnetic lines of force and this generates a minuscule current in the windings. I would imagine that lower ferritic content in the string materials would have a lesser effect on the magnetic lines of force and would generate less current, but I'm about as far out on the limb as I care to go at this point. My metallurgy is fairly limited.

    The other factor is the behavior of the string itself. I would assume that various materials and methods of construction would affect the vibrational characteristics of the strings, which would change the timbre heard through the amp. For instance, would a thin core wound string behave differently than a thick cored string? I would assume so, but this is mere surmising on my part.
     
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  11. Aymara

    Aymara Friend of Fred

    Jul 6, 2013
    Germany
    But don't forget, that nickel is magnetic too, but less as steel.
     
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  12. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    AlNiCo magnets...

    The best way to tell how "magnetic" something is is to clinch it in your teeth and stand about two feed from a working MRI. If you walk away with your teeth intact, it wasn't magnetic.
     
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  13. Synchro

    Synchro The artist formerly known as: Synchro Staff Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    Tucson, AZ
    Admin Post
    That's why I used the term ferritic content of the string materials.
     
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  14. stevo

    stevo Country Gent

    May 1, 2012
    Atlanta
    I'm not sure ferritic is the term you need is it? Doesn't it refer to the cubic structure/phase of steel? IE, steels can be martensitic, austenitic, ferritic etc. And I think martensitic and ferritic are generally more ferromagnetic than austenitic. I'm reaching way back to my manufacturing days where we worked with strength members in optical cable.
     
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  15. Wozob

    Wozob Country Gent

    Jul 6, 2014
    The Netherlands
    I guess I should've posted this in The Technical Side of Things. :)
     
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