For those of us into Motorcycle's

Discussion in 'Fred's Barcalounge' started by wildeman, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. Henry

    Henry Gretschified

    Apr 9, 2014
    Petaluma
    So true re bicycles, it really requires a culture that looks at biking as a part of a system that only works with rules. In San Francisco, bicyclists have a reputation as anarchists and biking as a form of rebellion. Go 100 miles west to UC Davis, completely different. Since biking is so prevalent, it is rule based. People stay in bike lanes and obey traffic signals. You have to register and get a license. And YES, you can get tickets. My high school buddy learned the hard way when he got a ticket for . . . wait for it . . . not having mud flaps on his tires. Yep required by Uni and Muni code, and many newbs get caught by the law and the natural consequences. In fact, they have a term, the "freshman stripe" for the strip of mud and dirty water that freshmen get on their first trip after the rain starts.
     
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  2. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    At Purdue, there are 50K people crammed into roughly a square mile. Pedestrians, bikes, motorcycles, cars, trucks, semis, and stretched busses all vying for space. I've seen people reading while riding, guy with a cell phone and earbuds plowing into a parked bus, people running red lights and stops signs in all sorts of vehicles, and little to no attention paid to the laws of the roads. At the beginning of the school year, they actually have crossing guards around campus for the pedestrians. Bikes on sidewalks are bad enough, but mopeds and scooters are even worse. There was a guy going thru the library flat out on a Segway. One kid brought his dad's golf cart. It got impounded for using uni power to recharge and illegal parking. If you leave your bike overnight on the main campus, it's likely that drunk frat boys will "taco" the tiers and rims. Now, we're getting electric scooters and rental bikes added to the mix. In town near campus, the sidewalk in the shopping district is wide enough for one person walking each direction. Then, idiots try plowing thru on bikes, shouldering folks out of their way. The uni had fences put in there as the drunks were falling into the traffic on Saturday mornings (they've got a thing called Breakfast Club. Kids get tanked at 7AM before the football game, then they pass out. Costumes, public intox---much fun). The tailgaters are some of the worst on football weekends. DUIs are overlooked. It's all about the money, as they say.

    Sadly, the really dangerous ones are busses and folks with handicapped plates. Scooters and bikes aren't allowed on sidewalks, tho they usually wind up there. Too slow for the streets, too fast for the sidewalk (it's sidewalk, not side RIDE), they're a danger to everyone. Too many different vehicles on too narrow and too busy of streets cause too many issues. When I started there in '79. I could roll in five minutes before work and find a parking place fifteen steps from my building. The last ten years I was there, I'd come in about an hour early, park a half mile away in the garage, and then walk back after a 16 hour day. Much fun. Now, they want you to park three miles away in an unprotected lot and take a shuttle bus that only runs till 6PM. I'm sure glad that I retired when I did.
     
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  3. MentalTossFlycoon

    MentalTossFlycoon Electromatic

    43
    Dec 22, 2018
    Texas
    Been riding bikes for over 40 years now and enjoy it immensely. Race dirt bikes for around 12 years had many getoffs that resulted in assorted gravel-rash, twisted knees and sprained ankles. My street riding so far has been accident free and will concur it is kind of a war zone out there for motorcycle riders in today's traffic. My Dad gave me some street riding advice when I first started riding that has served me well to this day. As a teen ager he delivered medicine by motorcycle for a local drug store. He told me you never want to ride a motorcycle with a car driving mindset. What he meant was, when you put a person in a vehicle with enclosed steel structure, seat belts and padded upoholstry all around them, they get the invincibale feeling nothing will hurt them at 40-60 mph if somebody sideswipes them, turns left in front of them, makes a panic stop in front of them or whatever. As a result you see cars traveling in close packs of 10, 20, sometimes 30 at a time with little concern about anything going wrong around them because they are in their padded cage and everything will most likely be all right. My Dad said if you are on a motorcycle and choose to ride in the middle of this pack of cars and something goes wrong you will by default be the big loser because you and your 500lb motorcycle will lose bouncing off a couple of 4000lb cars with any momentum whatsoever. He told me my motorcycle as a rule will out accelerate and out brake just about anything on the road.and that you need to use those attributes to either accelerate out of the pack of cars and stay clear of them or brake and fall well behind the pack of cars. The object being trying the best you can to be alone on the road by yourself with no other cars, trucks , buses around you. This advice has served me well in 25 years of street riding. Granted it may not be possible in all traffic situations but it should always be your objective when riding IMO.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
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  4. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Good advice. I rode for years. Enjoyed them immensely. Bicycles (5 mile paper route for 5 years on gravel roads out in the country), then dirt bikes, BSAs, and finally a Harley. I, like many others, had cases where people tried to run me off the road (lost two good friends due to that) and dodged my fair share of idiots. You do learn to look out for them---drive defensively. On a bike, you have both hands and both feet occupied. The wind is in your face, the forces of movement are much more obvious to you. You don't have the distractions that those in cars do. I also had small sports cars, and wound up driving full size trucks just because of that metal cage safety. I drive big old rusty trucks because people can tell I don't care if I get hit, so they don't cut me off, or pull out in front of me. Chances are good that I'll be driving home. I stop at red lights, and go when the light turns green. I stay in my lane, use my blinkers, and drive the speed limit (or 5 over). I obey the law.

    Now, the other aspect is that I'm old and I'll break a lot easier. With COPD, I really need air conditioning just to be able to breathe in Indiana humidity. It's also really hard to haul an amp and guitar on a bike.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
  5. thunder58

    thunder58 I Bleed Orange

    Age:
    60
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    Kids today don't have a clue ....... oh the good ole days ;)
     
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  6. kjmac

    kjmac Gretschie

    272
    Mar 7, 2018
    Omaha, NE
    I rode motorcycles for over 35 years. My last bike was a 1999 Kawasaki Nomad. Best bike I ever had. I wound up selling it because of knee problems. Got to where I could barely hold it up and didn't want to risk laying it down in an intersection. Here are a couple pics for your viewing pleasure.

    IMG_0431.JPG When I moved the license plate down below the fender, I filled the holes above the tail light with a couple of skulls. They eyes lit up with red LEDs along with the brake light.
    IMG_0447.JPG I had a Hypercharger intake and Vance & Hines bagger exhaust running open. I rejetted the carb and it would really scoot.
    IMG_0485.JPG
    Took it to Stugis about 10 times. I really do miss that bike. It was lots of fun.
     
  7. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    I cycled to school since I was 6. Went to highschool in another town, 4.5 miles one way every schoolday. In rain, snow, and even some strong gales. As a kid it felt like a game to me to push when others gave up and got of their bike.
    Now my 12 year old is going to a new school about a single mile away and he is asking for a scooter. Remember this is the kid that wants to play for FC Barccelona....

    This generation is doomed I tells ya. :rolleyes:
     
  8. thunder58

    thunder58 I Bleed Orange

    Age:
    60
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    I was schooled by nuns .... that's what this generation needs ... believe me
     
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  9. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    My daughter never believed me that I had to walk to school thru two feet of snow uphill both ways.

    Then, I proved it to her. We got stuck in a Lake Effect snowstorm in my hometown one Christmas, and then she saw the overpass I had to walk on twice a day.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
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  10. Scooter127

    Scooter127 Synchromatic

    501
    Feb 25, 2019
    USA
    I was the Road Captain for my post's American Legion Riders for a couple years so I know a thing or two about bikes and I agree on the high opinions of abilities some people have. I don't care if you have the riding skills of a motorcycle cop, riding safely is part of the skill set and far too many riders don't ride as safely as they should. I don't mean speed, I mean things like staying out of blind spots. Or, like a coworker that was literally run over, don't buy a 1000c crotch rocket if you aren't a good rider - it seems he cranked the throttle on a left turn and the rear end skidded out from under him, dumping him on the ground in front of an oncoming SUV.

    Back in the 80s motorcycle crashes were analyzed and the number 1 cause of accidents was an oncoming car turning left in front of a rider (a good friend was killed that way, she never had a chance). Roughly 10 years ago the number 1 cause of motorcycle accidents is the rider, as in "single vehicle crashes."

    And I'll add that in the 80s study motorcycles with fairings were "underrepresented in the data," as in they didn't get in as many accidents. That's clearly a visibility thing and the reason I put highway lights (aka light bar) on my first bike. Honest to God, when someone would pull out in front of me it was almost guaranteed the light bar was turned off.

    This is the same as one of my current bikes. Note the huge fairing and two headlights. And that reminds me I need to order some Custom Dynamics "rings" turn signals to add more front lighting.

    upload_2019-6-17_12-8-26.png
     
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  11. GoLeafsGo

    GoLeafsGo Synchromatic

    506
    May 1, 2014
    Whitby Ontario
    To this very day, I have a panic attack whenever I see a nun.....
     
  12. TSims1

    TSims1 Friend of Fred

    Jun 18, 2013
    Atlanta


    Gimme that Triumph.
     
    englishman likes this.
  13. Funky54

    Funky54 Gretschie

    248
    Aug 12, 2010
    Florida
  14. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    I survived Catholic School, too. First grade---Sr. Mary Talophelia. I still have scars. Nuns were either like your favorite aunt, or the devil's sister.
     
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  15. MentalTossFlycoon

    MentalTossFlycoon Electromatic

    43
    Dec 22, 2018
    Texas
    Hmmm....and I always thought they flew around in the air like Sally Field
     
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  16. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    Some do (usually on brooms), but, that's a bad habit to get into.
     
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  17. thunder58

    thunder58 I Bleed Orange

    Age:
    60
    Dec 23, 2010
    tappan ny
    They could knock a witch of her broom and not think twice about it too
     
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  18. panhead6zero

    panhead6zero Synchromatic

    Age:
    61
    690
    Jan 17, 2015
    The Motor City
    Badah, bump!! (Cymbal clash) for habit pun!!
     
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  19. GreTschocaster

    GreTschocaster Gretschie

    Age:
    65
    357
    Feb 11, 2013
    Canada
    We are off on a ride to Vancouver Island today. Taking the Ultra Classic.
    20190420_120838.jpg
     
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  20. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Friend of Fred

    Jan 19, 2012
    Maldon UK
    This was why I gave up bikes. I wrote off my right leg on a 750 Bonneville 25 years ago, and the roads were bad enough then. I sold my 900 Triumph about 5 years ago, and though I occasionally trawl the ads looking for something, Mrs D reminds me why I gave it up in the first place. Just last month a 20 yo kid from the next village was decapitated by a car on the wrong side of the road.

    Be safe out there, it's brutal when it goes wrong.
     
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