Buzzing saddles - tune o matic

Discussion in 'Technical Side of Things' started by Darren1982, May 5, 2019.

  1. Darren1982

    Darren1982 Electromatic

    75
    May 4, 2019
    Uk
    Hi I have a 6228 but I have some buzzing from the saddles. The guitar is setup but the saddles are little lose.

    Easy fix?
     
  2. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Friend of Fred

    Jan 19, 2012
    Maldon UK
    Clear nail varnish.
     
  3. Darren1982

    Darren1982 Electromatic

    75
    May 4, 2019
    Uk
    Really? Drizzle over the saddles? Or I’m guessing take screws out then put the polish on the screw back in?
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2019
  4. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Friend of Fred

    Jan 19, 2012
    Maldon UK
    Just paint a bit over the threads and screw heads. It'll act like Lockite when it dries clear.
     
  5. Bertotti

    Bertotti Country Gent

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    Buzzing Saddles? New band?
     
  6. Yukimajo

    Yukimajo Gretschie

    Age:
    49
    382
    Nov 4, 2018
    Exeter UK
    I took a different approach to the clear nail varnish. I used ball point pen springs. I got three the same (from one of those multi colour pens) and then cut them in half, so I had six lengths. I then cut those lengths in half again resulting in twelve small springs. I then took the screw and saddle out and added the spring to either side of the saddle and reassembled do this for all six strings and then re intonate and off you go. This has all but eliminated the rattle on my bridge, but it can be a bit fiddly to get them all back in without firing a spring across the room! I do recommend a strobe tuner for intonation, there are plenty to choose from for Android and iPhones.
     
    new6659, audept and Ricochet like this.
  7. Ricochet

    Ricochet I Bleed Orange

    Nov 13, 2009
    Monkey Island
    Inventive! Any pics of your handy work?
     
    Yukimajo likes this.
  8. rcboals

    rcboals Country Gent

    Nov 21, 2008
    Springfield Oregon
    For under $40.00 you can get a GOTOH Nashville bridge to replace the cheap rattlers Gretsch puts on their guitars. I use them exclusively now for tune-o-matic style bridges.
     
    calebaaron666 and wildeman like this.
  9. Darren1982

    Darren1982 Electromatic

    75
    May 4, 2019
    Uk
    Even the Japanese version (6228) put cheap tune o Matic?
     
  10. Darren1982

    Darren1982 Electromatic

    75
    May 4, 2019
    Uk
    Tonepro, Kluson or Gotoh?
     
  11. rcboals

    rcboals Country Gent

    Nov 21, 2008
    Springfield Oregon
    That has been my experience with pro line Gretschs I have owned that didn't come with the bar bridge.

    Tone Pro uses Gotoh and drills a set screw for the posts. I use these Gotoh Nashville Style Tune-o-matic Bridge GE103B Post Mount (Nickel) The Nashville is a little wider than the ABR and allows more adjustment for intonation. It should drop right on to your existing posts.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Gotoh-...102169&hash=item443aea138e:g:RNMAAOSw8etcsNrW
     
  12. emitex

    emitex Synchromatic

    661
    Aug 21, 2014
    NYC
    Might be worth a look...
     
    Yukimajo likes this.
  13. wabash slim

    wabash slim Friend of Fred

    Age:
    69
    Feb 10, 2010
    lafayette in
    1. Loctite or clear nail polish
    2. Compton
    3. Tru-Arc
     
  14. rcboals

    rcboals Country Gent

    Nov 21, 2008
    Springfield Oregon
    Both the Compton and Tru-Arc bridges are nice bridges (I have had at least three Comptons and one Tru-Arc) but neither are as accurate for intonation with a fixed bridge. You do not have any room to lengthen or shorten your strings for accurate intonation. They are very close with a floating bridge as you can make adjustment with positioning the bridge. They are not close enough with the fixed bridges only a Tune-o-Matic style will give you that. Just my personal experience with bridges over the years.
     
  15. Bertotti

    Bertotti Country Gent

    Jul 20, 2017
    South Dakota
    Don't they both make a compensated version?
     
    wabash slim likes this.
  16. Either easy fix or do it right . . . I'd check your bridge radius first . . . underneath radius gauges are great for the bridge as in this 'tube.

    Here, the luthier easily determines it is only one string that is too low and raises that saddle.

    I think you'd need the gauge even if you were to use, say, wax. too.
    if not all strings are low at the bridge.

    If it is all strings then maybe truss rod and neck need to be looked at.
    But I dunno.

     
  17. rcboals

    rcboals Country Gent

    Nov 21, 2008
    Springfield Oregon
    Yes, The only bridges Compton and Tru-Arc make are "compensated" bar type bridges. Your bridge is fixed and can't be moved forward or back or on an angle, the Gretsch 6228 is a fixed bridge like a Les Paul and many other guitars. So you have no way to adjust the intonation a bit by moving your bridge like you can with a floating bar bridge. This can be a problem with any bar bridge the intonated ones will be close but they will not be 100% accurate on a fixed bridge only a Tune-o-matic bridge can do that. To get even close to accurate intonation with a bar bridge you need a floating bridge base the 6228 is fixed.
     
  18. Darren1982

    Darren1982 Electromatic

    75
    May 4, 2019
    Uk
    You can only adjust the overall height of Bridge not individual strings. The tune-o-matic has a preset radius.

    I’ll give the wax/nail varnish ago, then possible go down the gotoh route.

    Wax or nail varnish? Does it matter?
     
  19. Oops . . . I knew that was a Fender bass with adjustment in the video but didn't think it would be different.
    nvm
     
  20. audept

    audept Senior Gretsch-Talker

    Age:
    71
    Dec 1, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    It was the never-released first version of Mel Brooks' "Blazing Saddles". It was a flop because they didn't use full strength beans.
     
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